kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Batman and the Monster Men

Availability: Ready to download

Matt Wagner takes the Dark Knight through his sophomore season in this new trade paperback collecting the 6-issue miniseries! Batman has spent his first year fighting organized crime — but nothing thus far in his early career as the Caped Crusader has prepared him for the new menace facing Gotham: super-powered villains!


Compare
kode adsense disini

Matt Wagner takes the Dark Knight through his sophomore season in this new trade paperback collecting the 6-issue miniseries! Batman has spent his first year fighting organized crime — but nothing thus far in his early career as the Caped Crusader has prepared him for the new menace facing Gotham: super-powered villains!

30 review for Batman and the Monster Men

  1. 5 out of 5

    mark monday

    poor Hugo Strange! according to one of my closest friends, Wikipedia, the now sadly left behind Mr. Strange was one of Batman's earliest antagonists: he debuted prior to such luminaries as Joker and Catwoman, was sharp enough to deduce Batman's secret identity, and apparently created a whole bunch of, shall we say, "Monster Men". and yet time has not been kind to him, and his infamy has faded. all we are is dust in the wind! unless there is a big screen version of us, I guess. this title seeks to poor Hugo Strange! according to one of my closest friends, Wikipedia, the now sadly left behind Mr. Strange was one of Batman's earliest antagonists: he debuted prior to such luminaries as Joker and Catwoman, was sharp enough to deduce Batman's secret identity, and apparently created a whole bunch of, shall we say, "Monster Men". and yet time has not been kind to him, and his infamy has faded. all we are is dust in the wind! unless there is a big screen version of us, I guess. this title seeks to redress that sad state of affairs, with poor result. set a year after Batman became active, the book tries very hard to capture a sort of retro appeal. unfortunately Matt Wagner - usually an intriguing writer - is surprisingly stale here, resorting to overly familiar characterization that does little to breathe new life into his cast. he does a particularly poor job with the annoying female lead. his art is also decidedly on the mundane side of things with an over-reliance on square jaws, even on his women - rather than looking atypical, the unfortunate Miss Madison ends up looking like Bruce Wayne in drag. Wagner does try though. he juggles multiple first-person perspectives, to no great interest, but at least he tried to juggle. and despite the mainly unattractive line work, there is the occasional panel here and there with imagery that is bold and compelling. the MVP of Batman and the Monster Men is actually inker Dave Stewart, who shades Wagner's drawings in pleasing tones of gray and mud-brown (plus the occasional mold-green) that create a noirish retro atmosphere sorely lacking elsewhere.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lono

    Batman and the Monster Men is another tale by Matt Wagner that is set in the early years of Bruce’s war on crime. This book is really part one of a two part story continued in Batman and the Mad Monk. While these were collected separately, the books are really one story. Wagner does of great job of giving this Batman tale an old school, gangster noir kind of feel. Some of the set pieces seem to be lifted right out of a Chandler novel mixed with a dash of Univeral Monster flick. Matt's bridging t Batman and the Monster Men is another tale by Matt Wagner that is set in the early years of Bruce’s war on crime. This book is really part one of a two part story continued in Batman and the Mad Monk. While these were collected separately, the books are really one story. Wagner does of great job of giving this Batman tale an old school, gangster noir kind of feel. Some of the set pieces seem to be lifted right out of a Chandler novel mixed with a dash of Univeral Monster flick. Matt's bridging the gap between Batman’s early battles with mobster types and the freakish creatures he would eventually encounter. I like that Bats is starting to have to put aside the rational and explainable and accept that there are some things even his brilliant mind can’t wrap itself around. I couldn’t help but think about Batman: The Animated Series while reading this one too. This book has similar qualities to classic episodes like "On Leather Wings" or "Moon of the Wolf". Wagner’s love of Miller and Mazzucchelli’s Batman: Year One is obvious here. Bats is still honing his skills as a fledgling crime fighter. Rookie Bats is cool. He’s also learning how to balance being Batman with being Bruce Wayne. Bruce is still flirting with the idea of having a life without Bats at some point. Batman’s relationship with Gordon continues to evolve in this one as well. They are just starting to build trust in each other. Wagner also gives a lot of artistic nods to Year One. A couple of images are clearly meant to be a tribute to Mazzucchelli’s masterpiece. Matt’s art is simple by today’s standards, but it’s for that reason his stuff has always appealed to me. Here's a couple of bits from both books. You get the idea. This book also acts as something of an origin story for Hugo Strange. He is more of the “Dr. Frankenstein” type instead of the diabolical psychiatrist in this one. Personally, I like the twist. I never really bought into the demented Sigmund Freud persona. Not that I don’t think most shrinks are crooks, just not “scary” crooks. Other notable appearances include Sal Maroni, the original Batmobile, and a cameo by the Red Hood. This one’s loaded with fun little tidbits. Matt is great at telling uncomplicated stories with a “classic” feel to them. He squeezes in just enough action and violence to keep my attention. I recognize that my love for most of Matt’s catalogue of work probably prevents me from giving an unbiased review, but fuck it. And while it’s not what I would label “required reading” for the average comic fan, I would certainly recommend a look-see if you’re a fan of any of Wagner’s other stuff, enjoyed Batman: Year One, or Batman: The Animated Series. The average Bat-fan will probably find a little something to appreciate in this one. And if you like it, make sure to check out Batman and the Mad Monk. Get this review and more at:

  3. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    I thought Matt Wagner did a great job with this! It's a look at a newbie Batman having his first run-in with Hugo Strange. Freaky monster mutations and a peek at the first Batmobile...who could ask for anything more?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sr3yas

    Batman : Monster Men (2006) Modern Batman #3 While I was reading this story, which is set in early crime fighting days of Batman, I couldn't shake the the feeling that Hugo strange and his faithful 'exotic-poisonous-dart-shooting' man servant Sanjay were in fact 70's Bond Villains! If we are following the linear time line, this story marks the appearance of Hugo Strange as one of the first Batman's long term adversaries. Oh, also Batmobile debuts in this storyline! Not a disappointing story, but n Batman : Monster Men (2006) Modern Batman #3 While I was reading this story, which is set in early crime fighting days of Batman, I couldn't shake the the feeling that Hugo strange and his faithful 'exotic-poisonous-dart-shooting' man servant Sanjay were in fact 70's Bond Villains! If we are following the linear time line, this story marks the appearance of Hugo Strange as one of the first Batman's long term adversaries. Oh, also Batmobile debuts in this storyline! Not a disappointing story, but not a great one either.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Set in the early days of Batman’s career, Monster Men follows the epic Year One storyline with a less than stellar volume that shares none of the preceding book’s quality. Monster Men has more in common with other early-Batman books that suck like Year Two, The Long Halloween, and Prey, the latter of which this book is a prequel to. It’s also a remake of a classic Batman story from 1940, so in theory, this book should be fun – except it’s not. Matt Wagner tells the story no-one wanted to read of Set in the early days of Batman’s career, Monster Men follows the epic Year One storyline with a less than stellar volume that shares none of the preceding book’s quality. Monster Men has more in common with other early-Batman books that suck like Year Two, The Long Halloween, and Prey, the latter of which this book is a prequel to. It’s also a remake of a classic Batman story from 1940, so in theory, this book should be fun – except it’s not. Matt Wagner tells the story no-one wanted to read of how Dr Hugo Strange became so obsessed with Batman in Prey. In this book – and in line with the campy b-movie horror tone of the book’s title and original story – Strange is a mad scientist trying to cure genetic defects inherited at birth, in order to create perfect humans. Except his experiments go horribly wrong and wind up giant, brain-dead cannibals. Because he’s broke and being hounded by creditors, Strange decides to harness these Monster Men’s strength to kill the gangsters he’s borrowed money from to get them off his back – enter Batman. Monster Men could be a fun story – could – but this one isn’t because Wagner’s treatment of the story is so very unimaginative. The familiar gangsters – Maroni, Falcone, etc. – are still stereotypes, “talkin’ like dat, bawss – hey it’s da bat!”, toothpicks or cigars sticking out of their mouths, flipping coins, while Strange feels like he stepped out of a Hammer horror movie, making long mad-scientist-y speeches from his first appearance and even having a be-turbaned assistant called Rajan! I know this latter point is intentional as this book is supposed to echo cheesy horror movies and the 1940 Batman story, but it just doesn’t work here as the tone is far too serious. The Monster Men are exactly what you’d expect – caveman types with large, irregular teeth, low brows, and frequently near-naked to showcase their hairiness. How wrong can you go when trying to create a perfect human? Strange is the worst geneticist ever! There’s a pointless attempt at a romance story between Bruce and Julie Madison, possibly the least memorable of Bruce’s girlfriends, which ties into the boring gangster storyline, and Bruce gets his first Batmobile. This book isn’t amazingly written or drawn especially well but neither are terrible - they’re just kinda average. I did like that Wagner referenced that panel in Year One where Bruce kicks a tree while training and Wagner replicates that movement exactly when Bruce is fighting the Monster Men. Also like a lot of other early Batman books, this one shows the decline of traditional crime figures like gangsters and the rise of the new criminals, the colourful villains like Strange, alongside the rise of the costumed vigilante. But inspired moments are unfortunately few in this book. Strange sees Batman beating up his Monster Men and realises Batman is the perfect human specimen, instantly becoming obsessed with him leading in to the events of Prey –an awful and contrived reason, especially as the whole geneticist thing isn’t touched on in Prey where Strange has somehow reinvented himself instead as a prominent psychologist and master hypnotist! Monster Men isn’t as awful as Prey but it’s still not good. Hugo Strange remains a crappy character whose presence in a book is a clear sign that what’s about to follow will be garbage. Wagner’s not a bad artist/writer but Monster Men is definitely not one of his better efforts. Books like Monster Men show why Batman’s best foes aren’t physically powerful, because guys who just hit things really hard tend not to produce imaginative stories while guys like Joker and Riddler become icons. Conceptually this is a good story, but the finished book is very poor.

  6. 4 out of 5

    StoryTellerShannon

    MINI REVIEW: it has been one year since the appearance of the Batman the local crime has learned to fear him but this is one of the early tales in which he deals with the supernatural. Batman's cleverness is well displayed in this tale. The batmobile is introduced. We meet one of Wayne's early lovers, see Dr. Hugo Strange in action and the early relationship between Gordon and the Bats. Artwork did a nice job playing on the shadowy elements in contrast to vivid lightings. OVERALL GRADE: B plus.

  7. 5 out of 5

    elizabeth • paper ghosts

    While not necessarily a bad story, it is a bit of a disappointment after the stellar Batman: Year One. Even though it was recommended on a few places I checked to read next for chronological order, I really think I could've done without it entirely and been perfectly happy. This takes place pretty soon after Year One and is one of Batman's first encounters with a more unusual (and what will become the norm) super-powered villain. Hugo Strange is a scientist obsessed with making perfect humans. As While not necessarily a bad story, it is a bit of a disappointment after the stellar Batman: Year One. Even though it was recommended on a few places I checked to read next for chronological order, I really think I could've done without it entirely and been perfectly happy. This takes place pretty soon after Year One and is one of Batman's first encounters with a more unusual (and what will become the norm) super-powered villain. Hugo Strange is a scientist obsessed with making perfect humans. As per usual, this never works, and he's left with completely mad, giant, cannibalistic, ugly, hairy...creatures. There's also some romance going on with Julie Madison and Bruce Wayne that also feels a little...unimportant? Or perhaps more realistically, uninteresting. (But that might be my own bias showing.) This is a quick read, and leads right into the next story arc of Batman and the Mad Monk. The dialogue does leave something to be desired after reading Frank Miller, and the art definitely suffers without Mazzucchelli's beautiful work. (Especially the women - poor things. They all kind of end up looking quite masculine and unattractive.) Stewart does try with the colors, but he doesn't have the quality of art to work with that Lewis did in Year One. Overall, not terrible, but not one I would recommend as a must-read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    Solid Batman versus some monsters story, from the same writer as Batman and the Mad Monk (Vampire story). This is set early in the Batman timeline, with love interest Julie Madison, as well as mobster Sal Maroni, and also features prominently Hugo Strange. Entertaining, but nothing essential.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

    This is a pretty good one and it sees quite a chilled batman dealing with maroni and hugo strange, this is just a cake walk for batsy, you almost feel bad for the guy like you've got a storm coming bruce. He smiles at one point, he's flirting terribly with his girlfriend (those law student jokes got so old, so fast) so it was kinda cool to see a different, less brooding batman and more of a focus on him than the villains. I've got to mention Alfred, who is just amazing in this, his level of sass This is a pretty good one and it sees quite a chilled batman dealing with maroni and hugo strange, this is just a cake walk for batsy, you almost feel bad for the guy like you've got a storm coming bruce. He smiles at one point, he's flirting terribly with his girlfriend (those law student jokes got so old, so fast) so it was kinda cool to see a different, less brooding batman and more of a focus on him than the villains. I've got to mention Alfred, who is just amazing in this, his level of sass is off the charts i mean look at this: it's worth reading just for Alfred alone! It's more of a mellow batman read but it's still interesting enough that it's worth picking up!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christopher (Donut)

    As a 'year two' thing, it kind of works. It is essentially a horror comic, and the art is more underground than mainstream. Bronze age kids remember the monster men from Batman (1940-2011) #1:

  11. 5 out of 5

    Matt Thomas

    Simple but sophisticated artwork, this title tells the story of Bat-man fighting Maroni, romancing Julie Madison, and meeting Professor Hugo Strange. Fun.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    A six-issue mini-series made as a sequel to year one and is supposedly Batman's first mission. This mini-series deals with batman facing Dr. Hugo Strange who is conducting genetic experiments on people he encounters that he dislikes and mental patients from Arkham Aslyum. He borrows money from gangsters to fund his experiments. He experiments in order to reverse deficiencies from birth, but all his test subjects become monster men, gigantic cannibalistic beasts. He uses them to steal money to pa A six-issue mini-series made as a sequel to year one and is supposedly Batman's first mission. This mini-series deals with batman facing Dr. Hugo Strange who is conducting genetic experiments on people he encounters that he dislikes and mental patients from Arkham Aslyum. He borrows money from gangsters to fund his experiments. He experiments in order to reverse deficiencies from birth, but all his test subjects become monster men, gigantic cannibalistic beasts. He uses them to steal money to pay back his loans and Batman eventually fights them and Strange begins to believe Batman is the perfect man. Bruce Wayne is seeing Julie Madison at this time and it is shown that her father is doing business with Salvatore Maroni, the same man funding Strange's experiments. Strange eventually uses the Monster Men to kill the gangsters under Maroni and this catches his attention and has him on alert. Maroni relocates and Strange eventually tracks him down and sends his monster men after him. While at the estate he's been moved to, Julie's father comes to visit Maroni to pay him back the money he borrowed. A lot of gangsters are killed and Batman gets involved in the fight ad tries to stop them, in the end Maroni survives, Batman saves Julies father, and the monster men and all proof linking Hugo Strange to the crime is destroyed, so he lives with no punishment for his crimes. Julie's father however, is afraid because he believes Batman will come after him because of his dealings with Maroni and becomes mentally unstable. There is a sequel called Batman and the Mad Monk.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

    This was pure Bat-goodness, hands down. Matt Wagner managed to pick up the stride of the Batman world immediately after "Batman Year One" with out really making it feel out side of the normal narrative timestream. This is a very interesting Batman/Bruce Wayne to read about, as he is still finding his way. He has some experience under his belt, but he is still fairly new at being Gothams's Dark Knight. I think Matt Wagner does a very good job of writing this aspect of the character. I also found th This was pure Bat-goodness, hands down. Matt Wagner managed to pick up the stride of the Batman world immediately after "Batman Year One" with out really making it feel out side of the normal narrative timestream. This is a very interesting Batman/Bruce Wayne to read about, as he is still finding his way. He has some experience under his belt, but he is still fairly new at being Gothams's Dark Knight. I think Matt Wagner does a very good job of writing this aspect of the character. I also found the added twist of an early genetic manipulation foe, fore shadowing the eventual arrival of Man-Bat, very interesting. Professor Strange is very real, and at times I almost sympathise with him. I would like to also say I found it very entertaining that Matt Wagner (a man in my mind, famour for among other things giving us the very magical/mythical world of "Mage: Hero Discovered"..et all) put what are essentially Ogres (or trolls depending on how you define them) into a non-magical Batman story. Good work sir! I wish I could find something bad to say about this book, but even the art was great. I liked the way it maintained the Matt Wagner "Mage" feel. I am only sad that perhaps the character of Professor Strange will die with this storyline. I hope not. I hope we see a return to the Professor Strange, with even more unusual mutations in the future.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Doctorjimmy

    Καλο...αλλα τιποτα περισσοτερο! Οντας το πρωτο μερος του Dark Moon Rising (του οποιου το δευτερο μερος -Mad Monk- δεν το εχω διαβασει ακομα), χτιζει σωστα τους Madison, το ρομαντζο του Bruce με την Julie, οπως επισης τα κινητρα και η προσωπικοτητα του Strange, αλλα το κεντρικο storyline δεν ειναι κατι το ιδιαιτερο. Αρχικα, (view spoiler)[οι ηλιθιοι γιγαντες (hide spoiler)] δεν αποτελουν στιγμη απειλη για τον Batman, και γενικα ο Strange δεν φαινεται να ειναι ενας κακος που θα μπορουσε να τον δυσ Καλο...αλλα τιποτα περισσοτερο! Οντας το πρωτο μερος του Dark Moon Rising (του οποιου το δευτερο μερος -Mad Monk- δεν το εχω διαβασει ακομα), χτιζει σωστα τους Madison, το ρομαντζο του Bruce με την Julie, οπως επισης τα κινητρα και η προσωπικοτητα του Strange, αλλα το κεντρικο storyline δεν ειναι κατι το ιδιαιτερο. Αρχικα, (view spoiler)[οι ηλιθιοι γιγαντες (hide spoiler)] δεν αποτελουν στιγμη απειλη για τον Batman, και γενικα ο Strange δεν φαινεται να ειναι ενας κακος που θα μπορουσε να τον δυσκολεψει σε καμια περιπτωση. Ο σκοπος του ειναι να (view spoiler)[μπορεσει να μεταβαλλει το DNA ετσι ωστε να τελειοποιησει το ανθρωπινο σωμα (και το κομικ δειχνει πολυ ωραια πως οι λογοι ειναι προσωπικοι) (hide spoiler)] , αλλα το μεγαλυτερο μερος του κομικ ειναι το βασικο μοτιβο του τρελου επιστημονα που κανει παρανομα πειραματα, με λιγα πραγματα που μπορουν να το ξεχωρισουν απο αλλους κακους/ιστοριες του ειδους... Στα συν ομως ειναι το σκιτσαρισμα που φερνει στο μυαλο το καρτουν του '92, οπως επισης οι διαλογοι και ο γρηγορος ρυθμος του κομικ. Γενικα, ειναι μια καλη (αν και χιλιοπαιγμενη) ιστορια με καλοδουλεμενη εκτελεση, που δυστυχως ειναι πολυ "minor" για να φτασει σε ενα παραπανω αποτελεσμα.

  15. 5 out of 5

    JB

    The story takes places shortly after Batman Year One as we continue to follow a young an still unexperienced Batman. This story involves one of my favorite villains, Hugo Strange. I have a love-hate relationship with him. I hate him so much that I love him as a villain. Hugo Strange tries to outsmart the mob by paying them back a loan with their own money he had stolen at a poker game. He is trying to create super men but instead creates monster men. If you are like me and love to dig into the older The story takes places shortly after Batman Year One as we continue to follow a young an still unexperienced Batman. This story involves one of my favorite villains, Hugo Strange. I have a love-hate relationship with him. I hate him so much that I love him as a villain. Hugo Strange tries to outsmart the mob by paying them back a loan with their own money he had stolen at a poker game. He is trying to create super men but instead creates monster men. If you are like me and love to dig into the older stories before you start with the New 52 stories or if you're following the New 52 and want to start reading some older Batman stories, put this one on your list! It has great art, I love the brownish tones and the speech bubbles especially the narrative ones. Catwoman makes an appearance, Batman even makes a reference to their first encounter in Batman Year One. Pick this one up, it's a great read and if you like this one, pick up it's sequel Batman and the Mad Monk!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Logan

    Very good! So this takes place shortly after Year One, batman is still fighting the mafia, the early days of batman's career. First off the art was awesome, i like how the artist draws characters, specifically batman! The story is also good, simple and easy to follow, my kind of story! I also liked how they did the narration, the book is narrated by many characters: first 2 pages would be narrated by Gordon, then Batman, then Hugo Strange etc, i feel it was a unique writing style. Hugo Strange i Very good! So this takes place shortly after Year One, batman is still fighting the mafia, the early days of batman's career. First off the art was awesome, i like how the artist draws characters, specifically batman! The story is also good, simple and easy to follow, my kind of story! I also liked how they did the narration, the book is narrated by many characters: first 2 pages would be narrated by Gordon, then Batman, then Hugo Strange etc, i feel it was a unique writing style. Hugo Strange is the villain for this one, and you get to see why he becomes obsessed with Batman.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

    Loved this one especially Bruce and Julie !!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Blindzider

    I unknowingly read the second part of this, Batman and the Mad Monk, before I read this and this one is better. It takes place about a year after Batman: Year One, and documents Batman's first meeting with Dr. Hugo Strange along with continuing the story of Carmine Falcone and Sal Maroni. Wagner is able to keep the same tone as Miller did, and added to the mythos by introducing the Batmobile and extending the relationship with Gordon. It's unfortunate all of the interior work couldn't be painted I unknowingly read the second part of this, Batman and the Mad Monk, before I read this and this one is better. It takes place about a year after Batman: Year One, and documents Batman's first meeting with Dr. Hugo Strange along with continuing the story of Carmine Falcone and Sal Maroni. Wagner is able to keep the same tone as Miller did, and added to the mythos by introducing the Batmobile and extending the relationship with Gordon. It's unfortunate all of the interior work couldn't be painted like the covers, but it still fits the time period of the story. A nice read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Evan Leach

    This was a fun Batman story set during the Caped Crusader's first year on the job. Bruce is dating Julie Madison, and is optimistic that he may be able to win his war on crime and lead a more normal life. He's working on busting the leaders of the Gotham mob, but the situation is complicated by Julie's father (who has some mob connections of his own) and Dr. Hugo Strange. Dr. Strange relies on mob funding to keep his...unorthodox genetic experiments running, but before long these "monster men" a This was a fun Batman story set during the Caped Crusader's first year on the job. Bruce is dating Julie Madison, and is optimistic that he may be able to win his war on crime and lead a more normal life. He's working on busting the leaders of the Gotham mob, but the situation is complicated by Julie's father (who has some mob connections of his own) and Dr. Hugo Strange. Dr. Strange relies on mob funding to keep his...unorthodox genetic experiments running, but before long these "monster men" are a bigger threat to Gotham's safety than any group of mobsters. Batman stories that depend on superhuman/supernatural villains are always a dicey proposition, and scientific jibber-jabber aside, that is precisely what the monster men are. But Wagner makes this one work. The artwork is very good (but definitely a little gory...the cover with the cartoony lettering makes this look like a Scooby-Doo style Batman tale, but there is some real carnage going on inside), and the story is exciting and well-paced. The presence of a bat-girlfriend, and an interesting one at that, was a particularly nice touch that helped set this story apart from many other Batman volumes. Julie is not just a wet blanket, hanging around mostly to be a nuisance, but an interesting character in her own right. And Wagner does a fine job in tying two loosely connected plot-lines into a pretty thrilling finale. This is not the most famous of Batman's formative year stories, but it's very good and well worth your time if you're a fan of the Dark Knight. 4 stars, recommended. P.S.: This book also features the first appearance of the Batmobile! What more could you want!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rob McMonigal

    Wagner did a great series about "the big three" called Trinity, where all were early in their careers. This basically treads the same turf, pitting a very new Batman against one of his first opponents, Hugo Strange. As Batman tries to take out the mobs, a newer, more sinister force is slowly creeping into Gotham--the beginning of the era of the super villain. Wagner does a great job of putting us in the head of the young Bruce Wayne, who hasn't yet settled on this as a permanent career path, and Wagner did a great series about "the big three" called Trinity, where all were early in their careers. This basically treads the same turf, pitting a very new Batman against one of his first opponents, Hugo Strange. As Batman tries to take out the mobs, a newer, more sinister force is slowly creeping into Gotham--the beginning of the era of the super villain. Wagner does a great job of putting us in the head of the young Bruce Wayne, who hasn't yet settled on this as a permanent career path, and still allows himself the idea that he could love someone and settle down. Wagner also cleverly winds the two stories together in a way that works--neither the Monster Men plot, the break the mobs plot, or Bruce Wayne's personal life plot live in a vacuum. Can Bruce keep his love without revealing his dark secret? Will he stop the mob or will the Monster Men do it first? And how can he take down real-life trolls when he's only one man? Wagner gives us answers to all of these, and not all of them work out! It's a little weird to see Strange as a sort of Dr. Frankenstein rather than a figure of crime, but the parallel works well, and I'm glad to see him use an existing character rather than try to shoe-horn something into continuity. I should also mention here his characterization of Gordon is well done, too--Jim still isn't sure about this figure of the night he's aiding and abetting against all laws he's sworn to uphold. This is good stuff all around. (Library, 05/07) Trebby's Take: Highly recommended, as with almost everything Matt Wagner.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Fugo Feedback

    A la hora de "redear" este libro hice algo de trampa, ya que no lo leí completo, pero sí la saga que comenzó en el tomo anterior y que es el que le da título a esta. Y si bien no me encontré con una historia bien redonda como me imaginaba, sí pude disfrutar de una que combina varias de las mejores facetas de Batman: el detective avispado, el luchador atlético, el estratega ingenioso, el buen tipo, el justiciero justo (más vale que valga la redundancia) y otros aspectos menores. Y además, muy bie A la hora de "redear" este libro hice algo de trampa, ya que no lo leí completo, pero sí la saga que comenzó en el tomo anterior y que es el que le da título a esta. Y si bien no me encontré con una historia bien redonda como me imaginaba, sí pude disfrutar de una que combina varias de las mejores facetas de Batman: el detective avispado, el luchador atlético, el estratega ingenioso, el buen tipo, el justiciero justo (más vale que valga la redundancia) y otros aspectos menores. Y además, muy bien dibujado. El Batman de Wagner brilla más todavía en dibujo que en guión; justo lo contrario de lo que pasa con Bruce Wayne. Creo que el mayor error de Wagner, que es un defecto que le encuentro a muchísimos autores yanquis es que no sabe representar bien las edades de los personajes jóvenes. Supuestamente en esta historia Bruce tiene menos de 22 años y su novia, supongo, un par de años menos. Bueno, ambos parecen treintañeros en buen estado, pero treintañeros al fin. Eso sí, me dejó con ganas de más Batman de Wagner e incluso con ganas de leer Grendel y otros laburos independientes del autor. Cuando me lo reencuentre, seguro sea para bien. Cuando me lea completa la historia "presa" veré si amplio esta reseña o le dedico una propia.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Also not terribly good. I only read these batman stories because of this web article: http://www.comicmix.com/news/2008/03/... they're both poorly plotted and not what I expected, having read some darker, grittier Batman books in my time. The art's kind of weird-- a lot of close-ups on terribly out-of-proportion eyes and weird, oblique angles on faces that make them look like they're melting and slouching. Avoid it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    J

    Matt Wagner did a pretty good job with these, though the character of Norman Madison is a bit over the top. (He says about a comic book featuring a bat-costumed vigilante fighting genetically modified cannibal mutants.) Hugo Strange is introduced here and is entertaining.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Batman and the Monster Men is a six-issue miniseries and the first part of the Dark Moon Rising duology that has Batman having his first encounter with Hugo Strange and his hulking Monster Men. This trade paperback collects all six issues in the 2006 mini-series written and illustrated by Matt Wagner. Batman and the Monster Men is developed and expanded form an early Hugo Strange story from Batman #1. In this retelling, this story depicts a young, optimistic Batman early in his crime-fighting car Batman and the Monster Men is a six-issue miniseries and the first part of the Dark Moon Rising duology that has Batman having his first encounter with Hugo Strange and his hulking Monster Men. This trade paperback collects all six issues in the 2006 mini-series written and illustrated by Matt Wagner. Batman and the Monster Men is developed and expanded form an early Hugo Strange story from Batman #1. In this retelling, this story depicts a young, optimistic Batman early in his crime-fighting career. Hugo Strange, a geneticist, wanted to use his talents on experiments that would allow people to shape their physical appearance to their will, but needs funding. However, what was mean to be the benefit for humankind turned monstrous. Although the intentions of Hugo Strange was to create the perfect physical specimen using human test subjects, he ends up creating monstrous abominations with superhuman strength and a taste for blood. When his work is mocked by Gotham City's elites and violated by Maroni's gang, Hugo Strange sends his creatures to get revenge, leaving a trail of brutality and torn limbs that baffle both the police and Batman. Matt Wagner penned the entire series and for the most part, it was written rather well. It is nice to read Batman early in his early career. He is rather different from how he is portrayed years later. He is more talkative, underestimates his opponents, and hopeful – definitely different from the obsessive and moody figure that he is usually portrayed. The text also has a strong feeling of nostalgia as this story takes place a little over a year into Batman's vigilante career. Matt Wagner does double duty as penciler to the entire trade paperback and because he was the main penciler, the artistic flow of the trade paperback flowed exceptionally well. For the most part, I rather liked his penciling. It brings back the nostalgia of classic Batman and it accentuated the text extremely well. Although there we some places where is art was off a tad, it was well done overall. All in all, Batman and the Monster Men is written and conceived rather well. It is an interesting story about Batman and his dealings with Hugo Strange and his monstrous genetic experimentation and an interesting look at one of Batman's earlier cases.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    A few years ago, I made a chronology for how to read modern Batman. I was focused quite a bit on creating the order, as opposed to just reading the books for enjoyment, so now I'm going back to see how the chronology holds up. A worthy follow-up to the Batman: Year One story, this volume introduces Hugo Strange through the eyes of artist/writer, Matt Wagner. I love the cartoonishness take on the noir tropes fromDavid Mazzucchelli's run. While there's not many scenes featuring the best known of th A few years ago, I made a chronology for how to read modern Batman. I was focused quite a bit on creating the order, as opposed to just reading the books for enjoyment, so now I'm going back to see how the chronology holds up. A worthy follow-up to the Batman: Year One story, this volume introduces Hugo Strange through the eyes of artist/writer, Matt Wagner. I love the cartoonishness take on the noir tropes fromDavid Mazzucchelli's run. While there's not many scenes featuring the best known of the Batman family, we do get to meet his first serious girlfriend, as well as get some glimpses of Alfred being Very Alfred. There's not a ton of nuance to the characters in this book, but it's mainly a modernization of the 1940s era Batman stories, fleshing them out and makes them more approachable to 21st century readers, so I'll take it. I recommend it for people just getting into Batman, Alfred groupies, and people who like Golden age stories but prefer modern art and storytelling. Original review here.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    Although many consider Batman to be the ultimate "realistic" hero, few recognize his beginnings as an occult-like figure, whose early tales back in 1939 were full of pulp horror and gothic references. This story, adapted from a classic tale in Batman #1 (1940), presents an update to that gothic mythos, featuring elements pulled straight from the earlier tale. The primary antagonist here, Hugo Strange, has a popular history as the psychologist who discovers Batman's identity, but Wagner harks back Although many consider Batman to be the ultimate "realistic" hero, few recognize his beginnings as an occult-like figure, whose early tales back in 1939 were full of pulp horror and gothic references. This story, adapted from a classic tale in Batman #1 (1940), presents an update to that gothic mythos, featuring elements pulled straight from the earlier tale. The primary antagonist here, Hugo Strange, has a popular history as the psychologist who discovers Batman's identity, but Wagner harks back to the days when Strange was a mad scientist, obsessed with the creation of mutant strongmen. Wagner brings much of Strange's subtext as a eugenicist back as text now, which thus evokes more of the philosophies of the 1930s and '40s, when such pseudo-philosophies were most popular. Wagner also resurrects the orientalism of the previous books, which again crafts a kind of postmodern reaction to the earlier Batman stories. On the whole, then, I think this first half of Wagner's Dark Moon Rising series is pretty interesting. It isn't the best Batman I've read, but I have to give some major credit to Wagner for trying to resurrect and reflect on the weirdness of Batman's earliest stories.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Josh Angel

    Set in the early part of Batman’s career, prior to the events of Long Halloween / Dark Victory. From the poor reviews I’ve read I was expecting this to be bad, but actually enjoyed it quite a bit. This is a Hugo Strange story, set just before the “Prey” storyline, and features the first appearance of a modern looking Bat-mobile. Curiously, Hugo Strange is geneticist in addition to being a psychiatrist in this story, and creates super- Monster-men. This is prior to his obsession with Batman, thou Set in the early part of Batman’s career, prior to the events of Long Halloween / Dark Victory. From the poor reviews I’ve read I was expecting this to be bad, but actually enjoyed it quite a bit. This is a Hugo Strange story, set just before the “Prey” storyline, and features the first appearance of a modern looking Bat-mobile. Curiously, Hugo Strange is geneticist in addition to being a psychiatrist in this story, and creates super- Monster-men. This is prior to his obsession with Batman, though the seeds are clearly planted in this tale. This also features another Bond Girl-esque girl-of-the-week for Bruce, who has a girlfriend this time around, who’s father plays a key role. I found this easy to read, fast paced, and interesting. The writing here is quite good, with no painfully cheesy dialogue to suffer through. Great art that does a great job of making the original 50’s style Bat-suit look cool. I’d recommend this, and would reread.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    I think that you can mark a truly memorable Superman or Batman story when, beyond having a solid plot and good characters (and this story and its sequel have both), the story has those truly iconic images that have come to define the characters. Matt Wagner is a master of iconic imagery, which is why he's so damn good at writing Batman stories. I liked how he handled Julie Madison's character, really giving her depth and heart, while simultaneously making Batman the cause of her father's paranoia I think that you can mark a truly memorable Superman or Batman story when, beyond having a solid plot and good characters (and this story and its sequel have both), the story has those truly iconic images that have come to define the characters. Matt Wagner is a master of iconic imagery, which is why he's so damn good at writing Batman stories. I liked how he handled Julie Madison's character, really giving her depth and heart, while simultaneously making Batman the cause of her father's paranoia and fear. Great, tragic stuff, and the villains were all played convincingly. Wagner really beats the hell out of Batman. He seems to be busted up and bleeding after almost every fight, which enforces that the threats are becoming more dangerous. Batman and the Monster Men and Batman and the Mad Monk are both great stories, but they work best if you read them together.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Emilce

    An enjoyable story that takes place after Year One. Batman's character is well written, Alfred is perfect as always, of course and the plot was interesting. In this story, Bruce is trying to find the balance between his normal life and the vigilante one. Since this is one of his earliest cases, Bruce is less brooding than he is nowadays and more hopeful about the future. Although the first two issues go kind of slow, the others are pretty good and quick reading. The only thing I did not like was An enjoyable story that takes place after Year One. Batman's character is well written, Alfred is perfect as always, of course and the plot was interesting. In this story, Bruce is trying to find the balance between his normal life and the vigilante one. Since this is one of his earliest cases, Bruce is less brooding than he is nowadays and more hopeful about the future. Although the first two issues go kind of slow, the others are pretty good and quick reading. The only thing I did not like was the romance. Though Bruce made it clear that he loved Julie, I wasn't convinced about the ship. I just didn't buy it. Maybe it's just my #BatCat feels messing with me. Again. It's not a must-read, but it has its good things and it's pretty interesting.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    Well, I've never read anything by Matt Wagner before, and I have to say that I liked this. It has a "Mask of the Phantasm" vibe, with a beginning Batman trying to keep a normal life, and even a girlfriend, and strugglin' at it. It has a couple of plot-holes and it's a bit frantic at times in the storytelling, but it's a satisfying reading with a well thought art that fits the writing style.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.