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Medicine Men: Extreme Appalachian Doctoring

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7-time Wall Street Journal and Audible Top-10 best selling author. National bestseller "Medicine Men" follows the beloved #1 bestselling "Heart in the Right Place". This is a collection of the most memorable moments from more than a dozen rural physicians who each practiced medicine for more than 50 years in the Southern Appalachian Mountains from 1930-2012. Hilarious, her 7-time Wall Street Journal and Audible Top-10 best selling author. National bestseller "Medicine Men" follows the beloved #1 bestselling "Heart in the Right Place". This is a collection of the most memorable moments from more than a dozen rural physicians who each practiced medicine for more than 50 years in the Southern Appalachian Mountains from 1930-2012. Hilarious, heroic, true stories of miracle cures, ghost dogs, and much madcap medical mayhem. Unimaginably funny and touching situations where men with nerves of steel and hearts of gold get stuck between a rock and a hard place in the Smoky Mountains. These men are saints who walk among us and Jourdan's father is one of them. Jourdan's work is often compared to James Herriot and Bill Bryson. This story collection is like "All Creatures Great and Small" but with people instead of animals or vingnettes from country doctors who took "A Walk in the Woods". Jourdan's first book is on hundreds of lists of best books of the year, best book club books, and funniest books. "Heart in the Right Place" was chosen as Family Circle magazine's first ever Book of the Month, won the Elle magazine Reader's Prize, named a Wall Street Journal Nonfiction Bestseller and ranked #1 on Amazon in Biography, Memoir, Science, and Medicine.


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7-time Wall Street Journal and Audible Top-10 best selling author. National bestseller "Medicine Men" follows the beloved #1 bestselling "Heart in the Right Place". This is a collection of the most memorable moments from more than a dozen rural physicians who each practiced medicine for more than 50 years in the Southern Appalachian Mountains from 1930-2012. Hilarious, her 7-time Wall Street Journal and Audible Top-10 best selling author. National bestseller "Medicine Men" follows the beloved #1 bestselling "Heart in the Right Place". This is a collection of the most memorable moments from more than a dozen rural physicians who each practiced medicine for more than 50 years in the Southern Appalachian Mountains from 1930-2012. Hilarious, heroic, true stories of miracle cures, ghost dogs, and much madcap medical mayhem. Unimaginably funny and touching situations where men with nerves of steel and hearts of gold get stuck between a rock and a hard place in the Smoky Mountains. These men are saints who walk among us and Jourdan's father is one of them. Jourdan's work is often compared to James Herriot and Bill Bryson. This story collection is like "All Creatures Great and Small" but with people instead of animals or vingnettes from country doctors who took "A Walk in the Woods". Jourdan's first book is on hundreds of lists of best books of the year, best book club books, and funniest books. "Heart in the Right Place" was chosen as Family Circle magazine's first ever Book of the Month, won the Elle magazine Reader's Prize, named a Wall Street Journal Nonfiction Bestseller and ranked #1 on Amazon in Biography, Memoir, Science, and Medicine.

30 review for Medicine Men: Extreme Appalachian Doctoring

  1. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Jourdan

    Had to love it, I wrote it and it's a lot of my favorite stories I've ever been told by over a dozen elderly country doctors about the craziest things that ever happened to them. These guys, working alone in Appalachia with hardly and equipment or medicine, and no money, did the most touching and heroic things....

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mattalie Mcinerney

    Sadly, this author took an interesting topic and a lot of firsthand experiences and translated them with a disappointing lack of development and originality. These doctors' tales were just too briefly told to offer insights into the culture rising anywhere above standard caricature. The aloof tone is often just strange (not funny) in light of the often tragic or near tragic circumstances of the injuries and illnesses brought on by poor working conditions or extreme poverty. In essence, a quick b Sadly, this author took an interesting topic and a lot of firsthand experiences and translated them with a disappointing lack of development and originality. These doctors' tales were just too briefly told to offer insights into the culture rising anywhere above standard caricature. The aloof tone is often just strange (not funny) in light of the often tragic or near tragic circumstances of the injuries and illnesses brought on by poor working conditions or extreme poverty. In essence, a quick but very unsatisfying read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shirley

    How can a book go wrong that describes fifty years of doctoring in the Appalachians where the qualifications for practicing medicine were "courage, kindness, patience, and a terrific sense of humor"? Here are a few examples of why I loved this book? "In the Smokies, doctors stand toe-to-toe with the dragon and work right in its very breath." I love good writing! "In the blink of an eye, I traded forests of white marble columns and vast domes of gold leaf for more than half a million acres of colorf How can a book go wrong that describes fifty years of doctoring in the Appalachians where the qualifications for practicing medicine were "courage, kindness, patience, and a terrific sense of humor"? Here are a few examples of why I loved this book? "In the Smokies, doctors stand toe-to-toe with the dragon and work right in its very breath." I love good writing! "In the blink of an eye, I traded forests of white marble columns and vast domes of gold leaf for more than half a million acres of colorful autumn foliage gilded by the slanting yellow rays of the late afternoon sun." "Anybody who grew up in the Smokies knows when you make a loud noise in a valley, or holler in a hollow, the sound bounces and rolls against the sides of the steep ridges, so by the time you hear it, you can't be certain where it originated from." Locals sometimes came to visit a doctor when they weren't sick. "They'd come by to see what sort of person you were." A doctor needing to locate a family called the fire chief for assistance. No, the chief didn't arrive to pick him up with a fire truck or ambulance. Can you guess what he arrived in to transport the doctor? I was fascinated by a paragraph detailing how Tennessee earned its nickname as "The Volunteer State". "The Smokies are justifiably famous for their infinitely variable cloudscapes. My favorite is when there's a low-lying blanket of clouds and the hightest peaks rise like disconnected islands out of a turbulent sea of white." My favorite story in the book was "The Black and White Dog." I even shared the story with a coworker because the story really stuck with me. I loved reading Medicine Men, Extreme Appalachian Doctoring and hated reaching the end. I will definitely be looking for more from Carolyn Jourdan.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cayr

    Carolyn Jourdan shares sometimes hilarious but always remarkable and entertaining stories of doctors in one of the poorest regions of our country. It reminded me of the James Herriott country vet stories, only about human patients instead of animals. These doctors are a breed apart from the pill-obsessed modern doctors we are all familiar with today. The doctors in these stories are really in the trenches - ambushed by under-the-bed groundhogs, paid with confederate money, and sometimes tending Carolyn Jourdan shares sometimes hilarious but always remarkable and entertaining stories of doctors in one of the poorest regions of our country. It reminded me of the James Herriott country vet stories, only about human patients instead of animals. These doctors are a breed apart from the pill-obsessed modern doctors we are all familiar with today. The doctors in these stories are really in the trenches - ambushed by under-the-bed groundhogs, paid with confederate money, and sometimes tending to injuries like medical MacGyvers Some of the stories of injuries the doctors respond to read like Darwin Awards, and you just know that what's happening in the story is not going to end well. I found myself laughing out loud throughout the book. In addition to the stories are quotes by locals that are just as funny as the stories themselves.

  5. 5 out of 5

    SheLove2Read

    A collection of anecdotes and short stories of rural physicians who practice(d) in the Smoky Mountain region of the Appalachians. I think the title is a little misleading, as there isn't anything in this that I would consider "extreme", other than the setting that these physicians were sometimes forced to practice in. Being a born and bred Southerner who has spent many happy times in the Smokies, I found this an enjoyable and lighthearted read. If you're looking for something heartwarming to rea A collection of anecdotes and short stories of rural physicians who practice(d) in the Smoky Mountain region of the Appalachians. I think the title is a little misleading, as there isn't anything in this that I would consider "extreme", other than the setting that these physicians were sometimes forced to practice in. Being a born and bred Southerner who has spent many happy times in the Smokies, I found this an enjoyable and lighthearted read. If you're looking for something heartwarming to read, this is one to take a chance on.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jana

    This book had a really good mix of stories and some really nice anecdotes. Perhaps I'm sensitive because I'm from the South, but I felt some of the stories veered in to caricature. Her sympathy for the doctors and pithy comments kept the book moving along, and the stories were funny, instructive, and touching.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tena Edlin

    This book reminded me of a human version of All Creatures Great and Small... country doctors and the anecdotes of their practice. I smiled, laughed, and was moved by the dedication of these professionals who chose to practice where few would or few would last. I wondered about the specific years of all the stories as I read, but I realize some of the stories came from doctors looking back through the years, so maybe they couldn't remember exactly. A friend's review (thanks, JM!) made me suspicio This book reminded me of a human version of All Creatures Great and Small... country doctors and the anecdotes of their practice. I smiled, laughed, and was moved by the dedication of these professionals who chose to practice where few would or few would last. I wondered about the specific years of all the stories as I read, but I realize some of the stories came from doctors looking back through the years, so maybe they couldn't remember exactly. A friend's review (thanks, JM!) made me suspicious about the motives of the author and made me hyper-sensitive to the possibility of a tone of "making fun" of the locals, but I think I was pleasantly surprised. Maybe it was a good thing that I went in worried, so I could feel relieved about it, instead of the other way around. It wasn't nearly as bad as I had feared. I'm not sure it's going to be a great "discussion" book for my book club, but it was a quick read that I wouldn't have picked up on my own if someone else hadn't suggested it.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Mangler

    Many of the stories were entertaining and/or moving, but I have two issues with the book that keeps me from giving it three (or even four) stars. First, it sometimes feel that the humor comes at the expense of the people being treated by the doctor, and that makes me feel a bit icky. Also, I can't help but feel that something is missing. At one point towards the end of the book, Jourdan writes about how the modern health care system is missing the personal element, that interconnectedness of the Many of the stories were entertaining and/or moving, but I have two issues with the book that keeps me from giving it three (or even four) stars. First, it sometimes feel that the humor comes at the expense of the people being treated by the doctor, and that makes me feel a bit icky. Also, I can't help but feel that something is missing. At one point towards the end of the book, Jourdan writes about how the modern health care system is missing the personal element, that interconnectedness of the doctor and the community. The stories hint at this, but because they are so brief the context necessary to really reveal that interconnectedness is missing. And while I enjoyed this book, I would have loved it if that context had been explored. Without that, it's just a series of amusing anecdotes.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kmalbie

    Audio.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Judie

    Carolyn Jourdan’s father was a country doctor in eastern Tennessee’s Smokey Mountains. She was a lawyer for a U. S Senate committee. When her mother became ill, she went home to help out temporarily as a receptionist in his office. The couple of days she expected to be there turned into four years. Having grown up in that poverty stricken area, she realized that there were many dedicated doctors who were dedicated to helping the people living there and that they would have some very interesting Carolyn Jourdan’s father was a country doctor in eastern Tennessee’s Smokey Mountains. She was a lawyer for a U. S Senate committee. When her mother became ill, she went home to help out temporarily as a receptionist in his office. The couple of days she expected to be there turned into four years. Having grown up in that poverty stricken area, she realized that there were many dedicated doctors who were dedicated to helping the people living there and that they would have some very interesting experiences. This book is their stories. In “Better Late Than Never,” a man who lived a solitary, self-sufficient life on his farm. When he was old and ill and confined to a hospital bed, he told his doctor about being a Marine in World War II. His story and the result of him telling it to the doctor is an amazing tale. “Uncle Eli” was a pharmacist who was asked to fill in for the local doctor when the doctor died. His story is how he was able to adapt his skills and accessible remedies to the needs of the people and, again, has a very unexpected ending. Another story is about a five-year-old girl who calls for help because there is smoke in her house and she can’t wake up the rest of the family. She hangs up before telling him who she is or where she lives. Guns are involved in several stories. “Tennessee is nicknamed ‘The Volunteer State’ because it consistently contributes a high percentage of volunteers to the military,” Those soldiers “are more likely to be killed or wounded in battle than soldiers from any other state.” The state also produces a large number of military snipers. Guns are part of life from childhood. A pharmacist told the author about what he had to go through to get help after a fall. No one was around and he miraculously had to get out of the woods and drive himself to the hospital. The conversation between him and the ER nurse when he tried to come in using his rifle as a cane is priceless. “Deliverance” is about a man who wanted to float down a river before the area was flooded by the TVA. He borrowed a canoe, though he had never been in one, and took a shortcut through a major white water area. Ingenuity and a lot of luck saved him and the canoe. “The Good, But Confused, Samaritans” was equal to the best of Tim Conway on the “Carol Burnett Show.” It’s about a courier from a pathology lab who has an automobile accident after picking up a lot of specimens and other things. He wasn’t seriously hurt, but my side hurt from laughing as I read and pictured it. Sometimes country doctors have to make quick decisions. “Tough Choices” is one such example when the doctor was called because a twenty-three years old man fell 75 feet in a mine. Certain that he was dead, the miners called to have the doctor recover the body. When he finally reached him, the unconscious man was lying across jagged rock, still breathing but his lungs were filling with blood. He had probably suffered multiple broken bones, including his legs, back, and neck. He possibly had brain damage as well. If he lived, he would likely be a quadriplegic. The doctor’s options were to let him die quickly and quietly or to try to save his life. A new doctor has to establish a reputation. Sometimes a life is saved even if the doctor isn’t sure what to do. Sometimes a simple remedy works and impresses the people around who don’t understand the science behind it. And sometimes all it takes if an accurate diagnosis and undoing what damage other people, with the best intentions, have inflicted. Jourdan writes about hospitals refusing to treat people because they were black and having a cross burned in their yard because her father helped a black man. Her father believed that “most of the truly disabled people were in no position to negotiate the complicated state bureaucracy, so only con artists had what it took to game the system persuasively and persistently enough to get declared disabled. Jourdan mourns the changes in the health care system which have distanced the doctor and the patient. Reading this well-written short book was a delight. This book was a free Amazon download. Having read it, I would have paid for it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lesa

    The title of Carolyn Jourdan's book, Medicine Men: Extreme Appalachian Doctoring, sounds a little frightening, doesn't it? But, it's just the opposite. The author of the nonfiction bestsellerHeart in the Right Place compiled a collection of vignettes, true stories told by doctors who practiced medicine in the Appalachians. Most of them are humorous stories, and Jourdan adds one-liners or simple comments with punchlines in between chapters. But, those stories reveal it wasn't easy to practice med The title of Carolyn Jourdan's book, Medicine Men: Extreme Appalachian Doctoring, sounds a little frightening, doesn't it? But, it's just the opposite. The author of the nonfiction bestsellerHeart in the Right Place compiled a collection of vignettes, true stories told by doctors who practiced medicine in the Appalachians. Most of them are humorous stories, and Jourdan adds one-liners or simple comments with punchlines in between chapters. But, those stories reveal it wasn't easy to practice medicine in the shadows of the mountains. Jourdan's book covers seventy-five years of medicine, from 1930 to 2005. And, each doctor who relates an anecdote practiced for over fifty years. Looking at those dates, it's no surprise to learn the early stories deal with doctors or patients sho served in World War II. There are stories of bravery, accounts of necessary action taken by men who didn't want to remember their service. There are family stories, some by Jourdan who talks about her father who practiced in East Tennessee, stories of wives and children called to assist the doctor in the family. Because of the dates and locations, all the doctors in this book are male. But, the patients were men and women and children. And, Jourdan tells of proud people who might not be able to pay the doctor in cash, but would do their best to honor a debt. Some of the stories bring tears. There's the ninety-year-old widow, crippled with arthritis, who made a quilt for Jourdan's father. And, there's a haunting story of a young miner, and the decision Carolyn's father was forced to make. There's even a story of a loyal dog. The friend who gave me this book referred to it as a snack-size collection. He's right. It's not a big book, but it's full of heart. It's a book that made me laugh, but brought a few tears as well. Carolyn Jourdan herself summed up the doctors, their patients, and the stories told in the book. "It says everything you'd ever need to know about love and kindness, patience and courage, and Southern lives, well lived."

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jaide

    Carolyn Jourdan's touching and often humorous novel Medicine Men:  Extreme Appalachian Doctoring is based on various happenings to numerous doctors, including her own father, from 1930-2005 in the Appalachian Mountains of Tennessee.  This is a follow-up book to Jourdan's novel Heart in the Right Place, which I have yet to read.   Medicine Men is nonfiction, however, it is hard to imagine doctors who make house calls or do not expect payment or to gain financial wealth, who instead oftentimes sli Carolyn Jourdan's touching and often humorous novel Medicine Men:  Extreme Appalachian Doctoring is based on various happenings to numerous doctors, including her own father, from 1930-2005 in the Appalachian Mountains of Tennessee.  This is a follow-up book to Jourdan's novel Heart in the Right Place, which I have yet to read.   Medicine Men is nonfiction, however, it is hard to imagine doctors who make house calls or do not expect payment or to gain financial wealth, who instead oftentimes slip their patients money for food or medicine.                        “How are we ever gonna find another doctor that don’t wanna make no money?” –asked by a woman whose large family hardly ever paid for any of their many visits to Daddy’s office, when I told her Daddy was going to retire. (Excerpt from book) It is a telling of a kind of doctor the new healthcare system will ruin, will never understand.  These are family practitioners who have treated a family for multiple generations, and who truly know the family history.  These doctors are to be admired, respected, and emulated for their special brand of healing, for the care they give above and beyond that required, and for putting medicine and man above money. Thank you, Carolyn Jourdan, for bringing attention to these heroes so brilliantly.  Too bad this book was not required reading before our new healthcare reform system was enacted.  

  13. 4 out of 5

    Shari Larsen

    This is a collection of true stories and amusing anecdotes from several country doctors that practiced in the rural areas of the Smoky Mountains, from 1930-2006. The author's father was one of those doctors, and years after she left home to work in Washington, DC, she returned to take over the job as her father's receptionist after her mother became ill. These stories are touching, compassionate, at times heroic and often amusing. These dedicated men often worked for little or no pay, and went on This is a collection of true stories and amusing anecdotes from several country doctors that practiced in the rural areas of the Smoky Mountains, from 1930-2006. The author's father was one of those doctors, and years after she left home to work in Washington, DC, she returned to take over the job as her father's receptionist after her mother became ill. These stories are touching, compassionate, at times heroic and often amusing. These dedicated men often worked for little or no pay, and went on horseback or walked to help those who lived in areas not accessible by motor vehicles. Many of them were miles away from hospitals, and often had hard decisions very quickly how best to help a dying patient. They were called upon to the jobs of surgeons and specialists, because the rural family doctor was all people in many areas had. I really enjoyed this book, my only complaint was that it was too short, I wanted to keep reading more stories.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    I had to give this book five stars. I read Carolyn Jourdan's Heart in the Right Place a couple of years ago and fell in love with it and the stories about her rural father doctor and how she learned to love her home town again. Medicine Men is a not near enough long book that tells stories of her father and other doctors who worked in rural East Tennessee from the 30's to the 60's. They often got no money or sometimes appreciation for their work. The stories are so strange you know they have to I had to give this book five stars. I read Carolyn Jourdan's Heart in the Right Place a couple of years ago and fell in love with it and the stories about her rural father doctor and how she learned to love her home town again. Medicine Men is a not near enough long book that tells stories of her father and other doctors who worked in rural East Tennessee from the 30's to the 60's. They often got no money or sometimes appreciation for their work. The stories are so strange you know they have to be true. Some will make you laugh and others make you cry, one made me bawl my eyes out, but all are inspirational and show true slices of life. I follow Carolyn Jourdan on Facebook and she is just the nicest person. I hope to find more of her books to read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lilia Stephens

    Lovable! Very interesting and full of love for your fellow human. I will read this book again in a heart beat. I was delighted to have the opportunity to enjoy this master piece. Very humble and full of human interest chronicles. It is one of those books you want to recommend to your friends and family ! I would recommend to my neighbors, coworkers and the occasional extranger. Enjoy!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    This book was at times endearing, but mainly just confusing. There were no consistent connections or introductions. I didn't learn very much about appalachian doctoring, other than the fact that they did everything for nothing. The lack of format really bothered me and made me want to stop reading as it so often made no sense.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michael G. Hodges MD

    Very funny medical stories Very funny medical stories Great and quick read for anyone who loves reading or hearing "doctor stories". From someone who practiced medicine in rural NC, these stories sound real.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    Wonderful anecdotes from doctors in Appalachia. The author was called away from her legal career in DC to help out Dad the doc for a few years. The stories she got are heart warming, incredible and funny. A very good read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Suzie Quint

    3.5 stars These are basically vignettes but they are amusing and open a door into an interesting time and place.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Humorous and heartwarming.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Casey May

    Great book! This book kept me reading until there was no more. I wish more authors could be as interesting, informative. and entertaining. A very good read!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    I must agree with Raymond. Did not care for the stories much. Most not even that funny. Boring!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

    In the book Medicine Men: Extreme Appalachian Doctoring, Carolyn Jourdan shares experiences from her father's rural medical practice and stories from several other doctors who practice in the Appalachian area. At the beginning she tells of how she left a high position in Washington, D.C. to come back to east Tennessee to help out in her father's practice after her mother had a heart attack and never went back to Washington. Then she set out to collect stories from other doctors who had chosen t In the book Medicine Men: Extreme Appalachian Doctoring, Carolyn Jourdan shares experiences from her father's rural medical practice and stories from several other doctors who practice in the Appalachian area. At the beginning she tells of how she left a high position in Washington, D.C. to come back to east Tennessee to help out in her father's practice after her mother had a heart attack and never went back to Washington. Then she set out to collect stories from other doctors who had chosen to practice in the rural areas of Appalachia. I loved this book! Since my husband was born and raised in east Tennessee and we used to travel to see his family there several times a year, I always enjoy reading books that are set in that location. There is a lot of humor in most of the stories but the reader also definitely learns about the extraordinary dedication these doctors showed to the people they treated---often without pay. In the end the author comments on how in our modern healthcare system, we have lost the human connection between the doctor and the people they treat. Highly recommend this book! It is a short read but both educational and entertaining! I read this as a Kindle book and am not sure how available it is in print

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I loved it. 4 stars cuz really, it’s not a *great* book but I can’t give it less than that cuz the stories got me right in the feels, right from the prologue. I had a sense of being in the room with each story related, and vividly picture the descriptions of the great Smoky Mountains (and now I want to visit the region.) I can relate from firsthand experience to working in primary care in remote and isolated communities, and the beauty of that life and the people I knew and worked with in northe I loved it. 4 stars cuz really, it’s not a *great* book but I can’t give it less than that cuz the stories got me right in the feels, right from the prologue. I had a sense of being in the room with each story related, and vividly picture the descriptions of the great Smoky Mountains (and now I want to visit the region.) I can relate from firsthand experience to working in primary care in remote and isolated communities, and the beauty of that life and the people I knew and worked with in northern Canada mirrors the descriptions in this book. And the bit about people coming to see the doc “just to see what kind of person you were ... “ yeah, been there. On my 2nd day on the job in one community I worked in, I had a clinic room full of every man in the community with a tale of some fabricated malady. Any story that touches on the profound connection between humans in their most vulnerable moments touches me. And oh man, the black and white dog. Where’s the kleenex ...... This book captures the meaning of a life well lived, in humble and sincere service to others.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cathy Hooper

    This is a collection of anecdotes from doctors who practiced in the remote regions of the Appalachians. They did not appear to be printed in any particular order. It could have benefitted greatly from introductions and some more cohesive connections. The stories were interesting, and for the most part I enjoyed them. I was bothered that they seemed to poke fun at the poor residents and were almost condescending at times. This quote explains that to some degree, but I was still occasionally uncom This is a collection of anecdotes from doctors who practiced in the remote regions of the Appalachians. They did not appear to be printed in any particular order. It could have benefitted greatly from introductions and some more cohesive connections. The stories were interesting, and for the most part I enjoyed them. I was bothered that they seemed to poke fun at the poor residents and were almost condescending at times. This quote explains that to some degree, but I was still occasionally uncomfortable with the tone. “East Tennessee is an area where life has been so difficult for so long people have learned the value of an awkward situation. In a place where everyone is poor, human foibles are prized as an endless supply of free entertainment. Inhabitants of the Smokies love to tell silly stories on each other.”

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    This has been an entertaining book describing the daily happenings of Appalachian doctors caring for families living in the Smoky Mountains area. Each story is a true life happening which only makes the reader want to shake their head in both amusement and disbelief. One of the best statements in the book explained how these patients had no embarrassment because this is simply how life is when you're living deep in the mountains with limited modern conveniences. You don't need to be someone work This has been an entertaining book describing the daily happenings of Appalachian doctors caring for families living in the Smoky Mountains area. Each story is a true life happening which only makes the reader want to shake their head in both amusement and disbelief. One of the best statements in the book explained how these patients had no embarrassment because this is simply how life is when you're living deep in the mountains with limited modern conveniences. You don't need to be someone working in healthcare to enjoy the stories. If you've ever enjoyed Loretta Lynn's Coal Miner's Daughter movie or Dolly Parton's Coat of Many Colors movie the settings are similar and people are colorful in character. I'll definitely recommend this book to my friends.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Linda Galella

    Just wonderful! Carolyn Jourdan has compiled a lovely assortment of folksy anecdotes that give us a peek into the lives of family doctors in the Smokies. These are humorous, hopeful and heartfelt nuggets of real people living hard lives to their unapologetic best. You won’t find any hi-tech Hollywood here. Come and sit a spell and enjoy the view of crepe myrtle and glorious sunsets while listening to an exceptional yarn from one of the many friends these “Medicine Men” will introduce you to. You Just wonderful! Carolyn Jourdan has compiled a lovely assortment of folksy anecdotes that give us a peek into the lives of family doctors in the Smokies. These are humorous, hopeful and heartfelt nuggets of real people living hard lives to their unapologetic best. You won’t find any hi-tech Hollywood here. Come and sit a spell and enjoy the view of crepe myrtle and glorious sunsets while listening to an exceptional yarn from one of the many friends these “Medicine Men” will introduce you to. You won’t be disappointed.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    A medicine book written about back in the olden days where a doctor took care of patients the best he could with what he had. No hospitals close by either. People paid him if they could most time not but they may have gave him a rabbit or something else for trade for helping them. Some of these accidents he treated were given a sort of humorous spin on them. Lots of short stories told by a little boy who used to watch his grandpa at the doctors office.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jan Funnell

    I decided to read this book after finishing a searing thriller as I wanted something light and funny and Carolyn Jourdan didn't disappoint me I loved all of the the stories but laughed out loud about the poor man who was hit by lightening whilst on top of a two and a half story home. However, I would have liked to have a bit more background and insight into the character of the people who live in those mountains but all in all a nice happy couple of hours read just what I needed at the time.

  30. 4 out of 5

    CarolB

    If you want to get a quick look at docs in the boonies, here's your book. It's a set of very short bits about different doctors, patients, situations, cures, dogs and low-tech office procedures, all told with a by-cracky wit. It's a good filler book -- something to read before I read a real book. It's engaging, but it's not enough of a book for me to recommend it.

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