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X-Men: Endangered Species

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"No more mutants." They say words can never hurt you. But they never met Wanda Maximoff. At the height of her madness during the crisis known as M Day, the Scarlet Witch uttered those three little words that obliterated nearly the entire species of mutants, consigning them to the dustbin of Darwin's evolution. Following in the wake of Decimation, and setting up the final sho "No more mutants." They say words can never hurt you. But they never met Wanda Maximoff. At the height of her madness during the crisis known as M Day, the Scarlet Witch uttered those three little words that obliterated nearly the entire species of mutants, consigning them to the dustbin of Darwin's evolution. Following in the wake of Decimation, and setting up the final showdown with fate in the X-Men event Messiah CompleX, Endangered Species finds the Beast in a race against the clock to see what he can do to save the destiny of his fellow mutants before time runs out. Alone and with the future in his hands, can he stumble upon the key that will bring about a positive change, or will a species now endangered be headed irrevocably for extinction? Collecting: Materiel from X-Men: Endangered Species one-shot, X-Men 200-204, Uncanny X-Men 488-491, X-Factor 21-24, & New X-Men 40-42


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"No more mutants." They say words can never hurt you. But they never met Wanda Maximoff. At the height of her madness during the crisis known as M Day, the Scarlet Witch uttered those three little words that obliterated nearly the entire species of mutants, consigning them to the dustbin of Darwin's evolution. Following in the wake of Decimation, and setting up the final sho "No more mutants." They say words can never hurt you. But they never met Wanda Maximoff. At the height of her madness during the crisis known as M Day, the Scarlet Witch uttered those three little words that obliterated nearly the entire species of mutants, consigning them to the dustbin of Darwin's evolution. Following in the wake of Decimation, and setting up the final showdown with fate in the X-Men event Messiah CompleX, Endangered Species finds the Beast in a race against the clock to see what he can do to save the destiny of his fellow mutants before time runs out. Alone and with the future in his hands, can he stumble upon the key that will bring about a positive change, or will a species now endangered be headed irrevocably for extinction? Collecting: Materiel from X-Men: Endangered Species one-shot, X-Men 200-204, Uncanny X-Men 488-491, X-Factor 21-24, & New X-Men 40-42

30 review for X-Men: Endangered Species

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nicolo Yu

    Henry McCoy, aptly named the Beast by his cohorts in the X-Men and whose feline appearance belie his genius intellect, has the mission of his lifetime. The mutant race is on the verge of extinction, their numbers once numbered in the millions and was on the verge to supplant plain vanilla homo sapiens in a few generations suddenly find their numbers reduced by 99 percent. The mutant gene simply disappeared and along with it mutant births, mutant would cease to exist in two generations. In order Henry McCoy, aptly named the Beast by his cohorts in the X-Men and whose feline appearance belie his genius intellect, has the mission of his lifetime. The mutant race is on the verge of extinction, their numbers once numbered in the millions and was on the verge to supplant plain vanilla homo sapiens in a few generations suddenly find their numbers reduced by 99 percent. The mutant gene simply disappeared and along with it mutant births, mutant would cease to exist in two generations. In order to find a solution, Hank finds himself dealing with a lot of devil, and the worst of them all is his doppelganger from an alternate timeline. The Dark Beast, as this evil twin is called, is Hank’s intellectual equal, without the moral and ethical code of the original. This is a surprisingly tight story, despite the presence of four writers and visually coherent since the styles of the four artists involved mesh quite well and helped tremendously by using a common colorist for the installments. The story collected in this paperback originally appeared as back-up stories to various X-Men titles plus a one-shot to launch the story. This is a good story for the Beast, usually he is a team player and works best as part of fighting unit, it is rare that he gets to star in a dedicated story. But the story is an excellent fit for his character. In the greater scheme of X-Men crossover stories, this sets up a plot point that is soon to occur in future event stories; the mutants are facing extinction and it may take both magic and science working in concert to restore the natural order of things. The situation is dire and any mutant death is a one stride closer to the end of their species.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    Not bad, not spectacular. The best part, for me, was the backup strip starring the Beast... but he has always been one of my favourite characters.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    I have to acknowledge up front that this has two things working against it. For one, these stories were originally published as short backups. That leads to a lot of exposition panels, more than there would be otherwise. The other, and far more important, obstacle to the reader is that we all know before we read the first page that Beast's quest is doomed to fail. Obviously, something this big was not going to be undone in a backup story. So instead of anything satisfying, we get a lot of Beast c I have to acknowledge up front that this has two things working against it. For one, these stories were originally published as short backups. That leads to a lot of exposition panels, more than there would be otherwise. The other, and far more important, obstacle to the reader is that we all know before we read the first page that Beast's quest is doomed to fail. Obviously, something this big was not going to be undone in a backup story. So instead of anything satisfying, we get a lot of Beast chasing bad leads, trying to make bad alliances, and generally just failing at everything he does. Yes, there had to be some acknowledgement that Beast, if nobody else, would be trying to undo Wanda's spell. But if he isn't going to be allowed to make any traction, it makes for a bad storyline. I do have to say, it's kind of interesting to me how much of a pass nearly everyone in the Marvel U is willing to give Wanda. If it had been, say, Dr. Doom or Loki or, I don't know, the Red Skull, this would be considered an utterly evil and totally unforgivable act. I guess it's different when it's an Avenger.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    Not unlike the most recent mega mutant crossover Messiah Complex, this collection of mini-chapters from the myriad X-Men titles follows up on the House of M story-line by following Hank McCoy – better known as the adorably smart and blue-fuzzed Beast – as he seeks to find a cure for an increasingly endangered homo superior. Although it does serve as a nice coda for the House of M, I’m not entirely convinced that this is worth being a stand-alone volume. You’ll notice right away that each chapter Not unlike the most recent mega mutant crossover Messiah Complex, this collection of mini-chapters from the myriad X-Men titles follows up on the House of M story-line by following Hank McCoy – better known as the adorably smart and blue-fuzzed Beast – as he seeks to find a cure for an increasingly endangered homo superior. Although it does serve as a nice coda for the House of M, I’m not entirely convinced that this is worth being a stand-alone volume. You’ll notice right away that each chapter is rather brief – which leads me to believe that it served as back-up material in all of the titles in which this serialized story-line appeared. And it is exactly this “let’s-relegate-it-to-the-back” suspicion of mine that is the likely cause of this story-arc being mediocre at best. I strongly suggest that Carey and Co. – the collective writers of all things mutant-related in the Marvel Universe – take a cue or two from Brian Michael Bendis, who not only revamped the Avengers into the phenomenal title that it now it, but also directed the House of M saga. (And like my personal “it” boy Ed Brubaker, Bendis comes directly from the stark realism of modern crime noir in graphic form.) Here’s hoping that current Uncanny X-Men scribe Matt Fraction can take us more literary comics readers places that Carey cannot.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Relstuart

    The Beast tries to come up with a way to reverse The Scarlet Witch's No More Mutants declaration. Lots more talking and philosophy vs action in this one.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    If you're a fan of huge action X-crossovers, this book is definitely not for you. This collection is a very focused story about Beast trying to figure out a way to kickstart the mutant population after the Decimation event. A desperate man researching as many scientific and magical avenues as he can, in the hopes that the mutant race won't go extinct in his lifetime. The fourteen part story is written by three different writers, and five different artists, and yet it works as one cohesive story wi If you're a fan of huge action X-crossovers, this book is definitely not for you. This collection is a very focused story about Beast trying to figure out a way to kickstart the mutant population after the Decimation event. A desperate man researching as many scientific and magical avenues as he can, in the hopes that the mutant race won't go extinct in his lifetime. The fourteen part story is written by three different writers, and five different artists, and yet it works as one cohesive story with a singular tone and no out-of-left-field twists. The non-Beast characters are used very sparingly. I recommend this for anyone looking for a comic about survival. You don't need to know a single X-Men character (you'll get to know Beast) or any of the continuity for this to be an affective story, but the more you know, the more dire it seems.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tundxetra

    The only endangered species is good X-book writing and art teams.... the more Bendis produced brilliance the less X-books shined in my opinion. This book, the quest of the Beast to find a cure for the carnage caused by the Scarlet Witch... and the dark paths he may have to consider to find a solution. A solid 7 out of 12 from me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    In “House of M”, Wanda Maximoff aka Scarlet Witch (Magneto’s unhinged daughter) uttered a spell so powerful - “No More Mutants” - that it nearly obliterated all mutants on Earth, reducing homo superior from tens of millions to a paltry two hundred. Following this event, Hank McCoy aka Beast sets out on a journey that’ll span the furthest reaches of the globe and a rich cast of Marvel’s scientific set (both good and bad) in search of something to reverse the spell. I appreciate that a book like t In “House of M”, Wanda Maximoff aka Scarlet Witch (Magneto’s unhinged daughter) uttered a spell so powerful - “No More Mutants” - that it nearly obliterated all mutants on Earth, reducing homo superior from tens of millions to a paltry two hundred. Following this event, Hank McCoy aka Beast sets out on a journey that’ll span the furthest reaches of the globe and a rich cast of Marvel’s scientific set (both good and bad) in search of something to reverse the spell. I appreciate that a book like this has to exist: after an event book like “House of M”, there needs to be a book examining how the characters deal with the aftermath, especially one that nearly ends a series of those characters. But couldn’t that book be a bit more... entertaining? This is ostensibly a book of shorts where Beast (and it is basically just Beast in this book with cameos from the Marvel U) goes from one laboratory test to another, his dull pessimistic monologue written above each panel. Throw in a few contrived fights and the book basically ends where it began. Combine that with the knowledge that the mutants repopulate again - the numerous X-Men series since “House of M” 7 years ago and the popularity of the series make this a non-spoiler - and this book feels quite futile a read. I like Beast, he’s a great character, particularly when written by talented writers like Grant Morrison and Joss Whedon but neither contribute to this book. Instead we get a sub-par effort from Mike Carey, Chris Yost and Christos Gage, and as a result Beast becomes endlessly boring. Ultimately, nothing happens in this book and it’s far from essential reading, even if you’re an X-Men fan, even if you’re a Beast fan. There are better X-Men books out there like Whedon’s “Astonishing X-Men” and Grant Morrison’s “New X-Men” run - try those rather than this misfire.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    Whoa! Okay, now we see Mike Carey come out of his shell. The gauntlet has been thrown, the kid gloves torn away, no play it safe anymore. I like that. This was an impress volume. The dire consequences of the M-Day event were more pronounced in this volume than supernovas. And the X-men had more of a challenge and even suffered more, drawing me in--empathy-wise. Countless scores of X-men, mostly peecogs and prophetics dead by the hands of Sinister and his Marauders, who infiltrate Mystique and th Whoa! Okay, now we see Mike Carey come out of his shell. The gauntlet has been thrown, the kid gloves torn away, no play it safe anymore. I like that. This was an impress volume. The dire consequences of the M-Day event were more pronounced in this volume than supernovas. And the X-men had more of a challenge and even suffered more, drawing me in--empathy-wise. Countless scores of X-men, mostly peecogs and prophetics dead by the hands of Sinister and his Marauders, who infiltrate Mystique and the Sentinel and end up kidnapping Rogue all in an effort to get to the Destiny Diaries before the X-men do. I like how Mike doesn't give anything away, the suspense is kept at a high crucible level, all we know is that we're on the verge of a decimation event, something that happens in the future, and as Blindfold intimates, she sees death everywhere. and that's scary, because we're left guessing and hoping that not another event like M-Day. The X-men can't servive that... Or can they?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    This is really a Hank McCoy (or Beast, if you will) story more than it is an X-men tale. It's a far more somber and meditative approach to comics storytelling than the usual saga involving everyone's favorite mutants. In point of fact, not much happens. If you're looking for a high-impact, action-filled saga, you might want to keep looking. However, if you're after more than just that, you're really in luck. Endangered Species features the kind of nuanced and quietly powerful writing that mainst This is really a Hank McCoy (or Beast, if you will) story more than it is an X-men tale. It's a far more somber and meditative approach to comics storytelling than the usual saga involving everyone's favorite mutants. In point of fact, not much happens. If you're looking for a high-impact, action-filled saga, you might want to keep looking. However, if you're after more than just that, you're really in luck. Endangered Species features the kind of nuanced and quietly powerful writing that mainstream comics sometimes lacks. Hank McCoy is a man obsessed and burdened and he doesn't always bear it particularly well. Without revealing too much, I can say that the use of Dark Beast as a literalization of the conflict McCoy's dealing with is very smart and very well done. They're not as different as they once were and our beloved Beast knows it. Exceptional stuff.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Kotkin

    When I read the Harry Potter series, I started with the fourth book and had no difficulty catching on to the characters and plot lines. The X-men series is written in such a way that it is impossible to comprehend this book without having read any of the others first. I had to keep consulting Wikipedia to reference character names, important places, and previous events. The names alone don't actually help me keep the characters straight because I still don't know enough about them to enjoy this When I read the Harry Potter series, I started with the fourth book and had no difficulty catching on to the characters and plot lines. The X-men series is written in such a way that it is impossible to comprehend this book without having read any of the others first. I had to keep consulting Wikipedia to reference character names, important places, and previous events. The names alone don't actually help me keep the characters straight because I still don't know enough about them to enjoy this story. Even with the help of Wikipedia, I don't understand the motivations behind the characters' actions or the reasoning for what they say. Apparently, I need prior encyclopedic knowledge to read this book, and it's just not worth the time and effort to me. I find this to be a major flaw in the X-men series.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    X-Men are hit or miss for me, but I really liked this. Beast goes on a scientific quest all over the world to try and find a way to undo the Scarlett Witch's House of M spell. He's prepared to do business with some pretty unsavory characters in an effort to find something to unlock the mutant gene again, but the true cost to saving his species may be too high. This was a great lead-in to the X-Men: Messiah Complex HC.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    Soooooo disappointing! Nothing happens, almost literally. I thought that Beast would, at least, get a clue as to how to reverse the House of M curse. But, all he succeeded in doing was run around the globe a few times. Whoopty doo...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Ledrew

    Reads as both a great story and a guided tour of the X-Men History in an organic way as Hank McCoy searches for the cure to the mutant M-Day extinction event.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jason Smith

    Excellent graphic novel for anyone who has loved the X-Men for a long time.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I'm glad how Beast's journey turned out (well... glad is probably not what I mean. Relieved?) but am sad that he had to make it in the first place. Hank is a scientist so I totally understand the motivations he has and the frustration with his ability to solve mutantkind's problem, but he still steps over the line into a dark path. The back issues at the funeral, I have no idea who that is or if there is something else going on. I understand why it is in this title, though.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Josh McInnis

    Really liked how the creators applied Darwin theory to the story. The perspective of the story is seen by a man who believes in science. I really enjoyed ready it was more than a comic to my and more a philosophical literary work.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    Continuing the great x-read of 2017/18... This mostly collects material that was in the last couple of trades anyway so it is kind of an odd tpb. It's a decent epilogue to M day and an interesting character examination of Beast and how far he will go.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Arjun Rajkumar

    Artwork is good and the premise of the story is very interesting but a shit ending spoils this whole arc.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mark H

    Beast searches for the missing X gene. And what a trip it is. Science, magic - it all gets in the mix. And the artists turn in some remarkable wok.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cody

    Not quite the most exciting, but some really great exposition that helps intensify the events of the next "saga" in the series: Messiah CompleX So with that being said, certainly worth the time. Fast easy read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    In the immediate wake of House of M and Scarlet Witch's momentous reality-bending statement, "No More Mutants", Endangered Species tells the story of Henry McCoy applying all of his scientific knowledge and tapping into every possible source of information and resources he knows (some less savory than others). I really enjoyed this storyline, because while I didn't necessarily want a conflict as serious as the sudden in-existence of the mutant gene to be solved quickly, I definitely wanted all of In the immediate wake of House of M and Scarlet Witch's momentous reality-bending statement, "No More Mutants", Endangered Species tells the story of Henry McCoy applying all of his scientific knowledge and tapping into every possible source of information and resources he knows (some less savory than others). I really enjoyed this storyline, because while I didn't necessarily want a conflict as serious as the sudden in-existence of the mutant gene to be solved quickly, I definitely wanted all of my questions addressed - which is exactly what this book does. Beast (a once potential proponent of a mutant cure, as a friend of mine pointed out) pushes his mind and his morality to the limits, all because of the looming threat of his race's extinction. And in doing so, clears up all the thoughts in my head along the line of, "Yeah, but shouldn't they try--Well what exactly does this mean for the mutant biology?--What are the implications of--Why don't they just replicate some--", et cetera. I really like this storyline for Beast, as I think it bonds him with his mutant identity in a way he's struggled with before, and introduces a new struggle with the aspect of himself with which he identifies most strongly - science. At the same time, I myself came out of it honestly thinking, "Gee, I guess that's it then. They've got no options here." The action dragged a little bit in the middle, but it's all part of Beast's unraveling and worked out well. In the end, we're left with a really nice character story that lends a great amount of gravity and believability to the moment at hand and the events to come.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Santiago L. Moreno

    Entre tanta morralla perdida en la continuidad, a veces te encuentras pequeñas miniseries que te sorprenden por lo gratificante. Esta tenía todas las papeletas para ser un ladrillo de relleno más: tres guionistas y cuatro dibujantes a través de cinco series. Sin embargo, la colaboración funciona. Los cambios de dibujo no molestan (quizás porque todo Dios colorea ya oscuro) y la historia no tiene altibajos. En la estela de las series dedicadas al crecimiento de un determinado personaje, "Especie Entre tanta morralla perdida en la continuidad, a veces te encuentras pequeñas miniseries que te sorprenden por lo gratificante. Esta tenía todas las papeletas para ser un ladrillo de relleno más: tres guionistas y cuatro dibujantes a través de cinco series. Sin embargo, la colaboración funciona. Los cambios de dibujo no molestan (quizás porque todo Dios colorea ya oscuro) y la historia no tiene altibajos. En la estela de las series dedicadas al crecimiento de un determinado personaje, "Especie en peligro" sobresale por su tratamiento de la Bestia. Esta historia aporta vida y complejidad al mutante Hank McCoy y se lee con sorprendente agrado.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    I was surprised by how enjoyable I found this read, overall. Often, these little microstories stuffed at the end of regular issues of comic books don't add up to all that much, but in this case, they form a pretty cohesive, decently fulfilling character story of Beast, on a quest to restore the mutant gene that has disappeared since Scarlet Witch magicked all the mutants away. I will say, this story does ultimately feel a little pointless in the grand scheme of the X-Men. It never feels like it d I was surprised by how enjoyable I found this read, overall. Often, these little microstories stuffed at the end of regular issues of comic books don't add up to all that much, but in this case, they form a pretty cohesive, decently fulfilling character story of Beast, on a quest to restore the mutant gene that has disappeared since Scarlet Witch magicked all the mutants away. I will say, this story does ultimately feel a little pointless in the grand scheme of the X-Men. It never feels like it directly affects any of the larger problems affecting the few remaining mutants, even though it is about the largest problem of them all. It basically functions as a giant justification of how the mutant gene could fully disappear the way it has, when seemingly anything is possible in a gigantic, fantastical world like the Marvel Universe. Beast exhausts all of his options in a clearly futile attempt to undo the Scarlet Witch's spell. But, that's not why I enjoyed this book. The story is weak, for sure. I just enjoyed watching the writers push Beast in directions he normally would never go. As the story wears on, his desperation becomes more and more pronounced, leading him down paths he knows he shouldn't take. His way of dealing with these moral compromises greatly affects him, and I just kept wanting to see how far he would go. Now that it's over, I can say I'm not overwhelmed at the ultimate arc this story took, but in the moment I enjoyed it. So, I guess this is what I'm saying: it's a fun read, but you can totally skip it and be fine.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    First off, let me say this book continues the House of M story. It is the mutant's struggle right where Wanda says, "No More Mutants", hence the title Endangered Species. The story mostly focuses on Hank McCoy "Beast" trying to find a way to reverse the mutant gene problem that was wiped out by Wanda from the House of M storyline. The book was entertaining and I enjoyed the art work in the book. There were some interesting points and very serious real life topics they tried to address in the book First off, let me say this book continues the House of M story. It is the mutant's struggle right where Wanda says, "No More Mutants", hence the title Endangered Species. The story mostly focuses on Hank McCoy "Beast" trying to find a way to reverse the mutant gene problem that was wiped out by Wanda from the House of M storyline. The book was entertaining and I enjoyed the art work in the book. There were some interesting points and very serious real life topics they tried to address in the book, such as, how far will science go to solve a problem. Without giving away too much of the book, here are a few of my favorite lines from it: "Life is lent to us for as long as we're fit to receive it and those who can't adapt, perish." "Wherever you go in the world, you walk on the bones of dead races crumbled now into dust." I thought the ending was lame but contained an honest truth. To be honest I hate the whole idea that the Scarlet Witch is really that powerful (to change the fabric of reality with a thought **see House of M story**). It also bothers me that through the whole book you have the best heroes and minds in magic, science, faith, and medicine all working to undo Wanda's reality, coming up with "Jack Squat". If you decide to read this book, I highly recommend the House of M first, so you understand the background of Wanda and her comment of "No More Mutants."

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    I’m surprised by the fact that I actually enjoyed reading Endangered Species because, as some other reviewers noted, "nothing" happens. Henry McCoy/Beast takes on the task to discover a way to preserve their mutant race after the results of M Day and he just runs into one failure after the other, which is expected. There are no real surprises, it would have been shocking if he actually found a method to accomplish a task this grand. I feel like I enjoyed reading through Beast’s journey mainly be I’m surprised by the fact that I actually enjoyed reading Endangered Species because, as some other reviewers noted, "nothing" happens. Henry McCoy/Beast takes on the task to discover a way to preserve their mutant race after the results of M Day and he just runs into one failure after the other, which is expected. There are no real surprises, it would have been shocking if he actually found a method to accomplish a task this grand. I feel like I enjoyed reading through Beast’s journey mainly because you see the effects M Day has in the world and how it has affected mutants. The relentless efforts to find an answer to the Scarlet Witch’s spell made the situation feel real and frustrating as to what became of Wanda Maximoff. I would recommend reading this if you’re interested in seeing Beast in his most vulnerable and desperate moment, a man of science and logic reduced to broadening research in other fields of study because he simply won't accept the results. This is also a good read if you want to know the actions taken to find the answer to the irreversible result to the Scarlet Witch’s spell.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    Another serialized installment of the current depressing run of Mike Carey's X-Men! After an anonymous mutant dies, Beast does his darndest to figure out how to reverse the coming mutant extinction caused by Scarlet Witch in House of M. Beast is rarely the star (he's kind of the Martian Manhunter of the X-Men), and it's fun to see him traipse across the globe and interact with all the guest stars (especially the almost forgotten Dark Beast). However, this story isn't a particularly gripping o Another serialized installment of the current depressing run of Mike Carey's X-Men! After an anonymous mutant dies, Beast does his darndest to figure out how to reverse the coming mutant extinction caused by Scarlet Witch in House of M. Beast is rarely the star (he's kind of the Martian Manhunter of the X-Men), and it's fun to see him traipse across the globe and interact with all the guest stars (especially the almost forgotten Dark Beast). However, this story isn't a particularly gripping one: a scientist, mostly through a monologue diary entry, fails to solve an unsolvable problem. There's a bunch of unnecessary fighting to spice up what's a (not especially bright) academic story. This is probably the best thing of Mike Carey's I've ever read. (I should probably stop reading his comics.)

  28. 5 out of 5

    David Basora

    A fascinating profile of Beast's research into saving mutant-kind following the events of M-Day, that really reminded me why he is one of my favorite X-Men. It justifies to me why things took such a drastic turn in Brian Michael Bendis's All-New X-Men, Vol. 1: Yesterday's X-Men. Now I need to read X-Men: Messiah Complex to link this and X-Men: Second Coming.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Davy

    I already collected most of the Messiah Complex - Second Coming saga so I had to add up Endangered Species. The story is almost solemny about Beast (not my most favorite character, but for this story the right "mutant" for the job), searching for a "solution" of the 'House of M'-disaster and being confronted with his ethical dillemas. I you read this book without nowing nothing of House of M, you probably wouldn't understand a lot about it. Although there is not much action ("nothing really happ I already collected most of the Messiah Complex - Second Coming saga so I had to add up Endangered Species. The story is almost solemny about Beast (not my most favorite character, but for this story the right "mutant" for the job), searching for a "solution" of the 'House of M'-disaster and being confronted with his ethical dillemas. I you read this book without nowing nothing of House of M, you probably wouldn't understand a lot about it. Although there is not much action ("nothing really happens") I enjoyed reading it. The story reads fluid, like a diary of Beast's dreadfull atempts so save mutantkind. The story is a good aftermath of House of M (much better for example as 'The 198'), but al hope seems lost...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Leigh

    This definitely has to be one of my favorite X-Men comics I've read so far, aside from Kyle and Yost's run on X-23. It is such a treat to be able to see so clearly into the mind and motivations of Henry McCoy, who has quickly become my favorite of the X-Men. He is sharp and quick in both mind and body, and it is always tragic to see him at such odds with himself regarding his mutation. Watching him search so desperately, so longingly for some sort of cure for what happened on M-Day is devastatin This definitely has to be one of my favorite X-Men comics I've read so far, aside from Kyle and Yost's run on X-23. It is such a treat to be able to see so clearly into the mind and motivations of Henry McCoy, who has quickly become my favorite of the X-Men. He is sharp and quick in both mind and body, and it is always tragic to see him at such odds with himself regarding his mutation. Watching him search so desperately, so longingly for some sort of cure for what happened on M-Day is devastating at times and enthralling at others, especially once I found myself actually, for a fraction of a second, excited at the prospect of what would happen should Beast let himself be absolved of his morals and do awful deeds in the hope of, ultimately, doing something remarkable and altruistic.

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