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A military thriller for the drone age: Brad Thor meets Avatar in this near-future thriller, which spins the troubles of today into the cataclysm of tomorrow. A rocket-ride of a read packed with high action, cutting-edge technology, and global politics, Tin Men begins with the end of the world as we know it and shoots forth from there. In the near future, the U.S. has deploy A military thriller for the drone age: Brad Thor meets Avatar in this near-future thriller, which spins the troubles of today into the cataclysm of tomorrow. A rocket-ride of a read packed with high action, cutting-edge technology, and global politics, Tin Men begins with the end of the world as we know it and shoots forth from there. In the near future, the U.S. has deployed the Remote Infantry Corps: thousands of robots remote-piloted by soldiers whose bodies lie hidden in underground bases. But the worst occurs when anarchists set off a global pulse that shorts out electrical connections. In Damascus, Private Danny Kelso, Corporal Kate Wade, and their platoon realize they are trapped inside the Tin Men—something the government never warned them could happen. In Athens, the G20 Summit comes under fire, and a band of security soldiers and advisors risk everything in an effort to shepherd the President to safety. As chaos descends, and with anarchist Bot Killers on their trail, the Tin Men must survive a gauntlet of violence on the road from Damascus to the heart of Europe, half of them determined to stay true to their mission and save their president, half of them hellbent to save themselves...


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A military thriller for the drone age: Brad Thor meets Avatar in this near-future thriller, which spins the troubles of today into the cataclysm of tomorrow. A rocket-ride of a read packed with high action, cutting-edge technology, and global politics, Tin Men begins with the end of the world as we know it and shoots forth from there. In the near future, the U.S. has deploy A military thriller for the drone age: Brad Thor meets Avatar in this near-future thriller, which spins the troubles of today into the cataclysm of tomorrow. A rocket-ride of a read packed with high action, cutting-edge technology, and global politics, Tin Men begins with the end of the world as we know it and shoots forth from there. In the near future, the U.S. has deployed the Remote Infantry Corps: thousands of robots remote-piloted by soldiers whose bodies lie hidden in underground bases. But the worst occurs when anarchists set off a global pulse that shorts out electrical connections. In Damascus, Private Danny Kelso, Corporal Kate Wade, and their platoon realize they are trapped inside the Tin Men—something the government never warned them could happen. In Athens, the G20 Summit comes under fire, and a band of security soldiers and advisors risk everything in an effort to shepherd the President to safety. As chaos descends, and with anarchist Bot Killers on their trail, the Tin Men must survive a gauntlet of violence on the road from Damascus to the heart of Europe, half of them determined to stay true to their mission and save their president, half of them hellbent to save themselves...

30 review for Tin Men

  1. 5 out of 5

    Frank Errington

    Review copy Another book packed with action and built on a terrific premise. In the future, hot spots around the globe are kept under control by Remote Infantry Units. The men and women who control these machines are all stationed in an ultra secure underground location at the Wiesbaden Army Airfield in Germany. At least that's where their bodies are while their minds are elsewhere controlling the Tin Men. With both men and women participating in the project, why didn't they call them Tin Soldiers Review copy Another book packed with action and built on a terrific premise. In the future, hot spots around the globe are kept under control by Remote Infantry Units. The men and women who control these machines are all stationed in an ultra secure underground location at the Wiesbaden Army Airfield in Germany. At least that's where their bodies are while their minds are elsewhere controlling the Tin Men. With both men and women participating in the project, why didn't they call them Tin Soldiers instead of Tin Men. The book provides a great answer. "The Tin Men were mostly utilized for meddling in the business of other nations. They ended civil wars, oversaw fair elections, removed dictators, and by their mere presence they ended regional conflicts. Nobody seemed to notice that Remote Infantry Units had not invaded Russia or claimed the Middle Eastern oil fields for the United States or toppled any governments that weren't involved in actively torturing or murdering their citizens. Oppression was being suffocated and the result was a more just and peaceful world,, achieved through force and intimidation." Of course not everyone is happy with the stability provided by the U.S.and one day the unthinkable happens. I don't want to spoil the experience with the hows and whys of what occurs. You really should read this one for yourself. In some ways the concept reminded me of Avatar, but there were numerous differences. The story also read like John Scalzi's Old Man's War, but overall Tin Men is wildly original and a fast paced read. As fantastical a story as this is, it's filled with truth. A sound tale, well told. As much about the people as it is about the conflict. Available now in hardback, paperback, e-book and audio-book. Published by Ballantine Books. Tin Men gets my highest recommendation.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Marcia

    Tinnen Soldaten is een verhaal dat beangstigend dichtbij komt en de complexiteit van de war on terrorism benadrukt. Robotsoldaten worden ingezet om de vrede te bewaren, maar deze westerse bemoeienis wordt algauw afgestraft met een terroristische aanslag die grootse, wereldwijde gevolgen met zich meebrengt. Wat volgt is een verhaal vol actie en de harde realiteit van een oorlog, waarin we deze crisis op de voet volgen door het perspectief van verschillende personages die zich op verschillende lo Tinnen Soldaten is een verhaal dat beangstigend dichtbij komt en de complexiteit van de war on terrorism benadrukt. Robotsoldaten worden ingezet om de vrede te bewaren, maar deze westerse bemoeienis wordt algauw afgestraft met een terroristische aanslag die grootse, wereldwijde gevolgen met zich meebrengt. Wat volgt is een verhaal vol actie en de harde realiteit van een oorlog, waarin we deze crisis op de voet volgen door het perspectief van verschillende personages die zich op verschillende locaties en aan verschillende kanten van de strijd bevinden. Een ontzettend interessant verhaal dat jou als lezer aan het denken zet over de westerse bemoeienis in de toekomst van de maatschappij. Actueel en spannend met hier en daar een vleugje romantiek; een absolute aanrader als je het mij vraagt! Mijn complete recensie lees je op Oog op de Toekomst.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Book Riot Community

    If you're not familiar with Golden, let me tell you, he's one of the hardest working authors in the business. Novels, comics, anthologies - I don't know how he does it all! His newest effort is a fast-paced, high-tech, apocalypsy novel about robot soldiers fighting to keep order in a chaotic world. These robots are controlled remotely, and when anarchists disrupt the world's technology with an electromagnetic pulse, the human operators become trapped in the tin men! It's hella fantastic and acti If you're not familiar with Golden, let me tell you, he's one of the hardest working authors in the business. Novels, comics, anthologies - I don't know how he does it all! His newest effort is a fast-paced, high-tech, apocalypsy novel about robot soldiers fighting to keep order in a chaotic world. These robots are controlled remotely, and when anarchists disrupt the world's technology with an electromagnetic pulse, the human operators become trapped in the tin men! It's hella fantastic and action packed, and makes you think - which is always a bonus. Don't miss our awesome weekly podcast All The Books for the latest in new books each week: http://bookriot.com/category/all-the-...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mike (the Paladin)

    I may go back to this at a later date so I'm holding off on a rating. I love military science fiction....space opera etc. I find that most of the better books in the genre I've read have turned out to be "space fleet" type books, so I'm always looking for good "ground-pounder" science fiction action. This sounded like a far fetched but interesting story... Sadly not only is it far fetched it's just not that interesting. Now, I'm in a reading slump. Nothing is really appealing to me right now. That I may go back to this at a later date so I'm holding off on a rating. I love military science fiction....space opera etc. I find that most of the better books in the genre I've read have turned out to be "space fleet" type books, so I'm always looking for good "ground-pounder" science fiction action. This sounded like a far fetched but interesting story... Sadly not only is it far fetched it's just not that interesting. Now, I'm in a reading slump. Nothing is really appealing to me right now. That said I'm still very underwhelmed here and am laying the book aside. At a later time I may go back and give it another shot. For now the "really strained" plot (and I mean really, truly strained) and fumbling attemots at political insight/pontification have exceeded my shoz-bot-ometer.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sachin Dev

    Tin men by Christopher Golden. I confess I haven’t read Christopher Golden before – But having raced through Tin Men in a day (in one friggin’ DAY people. That’s how addictive the writing is!), he is definitely a tour-de-force to be reckoned with. Science-fiction mixed with global politics and tonnes of blistering non-stop action: On the surface, Tin Men is a book that delivers gobs of all this. But dig a bit and it raises questions galore. In an unspecified near future world – where economies ha Tin men by Christopher Golden. I confess I haven’t read Christopher Golden before – But having raced through Tin Men in a day (in one friggin’ DAY people. That’s how addictive the writing is!), he is definitely a tour-de-force to be reckoned with. Science-fiction mixed with global politics and tonnes of blistering non-stop action: On the surface, Tin Men is a book that delivers gobs of all this. But dig a bit and it raises questions galore. In an unspecified near future world – where economies have collapsed, global warming has led to sea levels rising, food supplies have been hit and flood and drought are the order of the day. The world is in a constant state of chaos – Jihadists and Anarchists destabilizing life, tyrants and dictators around the world vying for control and civilians a mass collateral damage to everything. Into this world, America (Uncle Sam!) sends out RIC (Remote Infantry Corps) as a global peace-keeping force. These robots are controlled by actual soldiers – stationed somewhere deep underground in Germany in a military base known as the Hump – their minds offloaded into the tin-metal monsters and thus controlling every action of the bots. Sealed into canisters and monitored for 8-hour shifts by support and tech staff within the base. The story focuses on Platoon A. (Assholes) and the Tin-men associated with this platoon stationed in Damascus, Syria – a deeply unsettled country where the anarchists are increasingly getting disillusioned by the role of US in their internal affairs. The US utilize the Tin Men to diffuse hot-spots across the world and maintain order – but the rest of the world hardly see it this way. And the tension starts to simmer and slowly pop – starting off in Damascus where an ex-warlord from Afghanistan leads an army of anarchists armed with bot-killers ( a new-age rockets specifically designed to damage the robots – take out their power core) targeting Platoon A on duty. This is followed by a worldwide electromagnetic pulse (EMP) that fries all sat-comm links, electronic devices all around the world. Throwing everything out of whack. Including the Tin Men – who are now stuck with their minds inside the bot-bodies without a satellite that ideally should have helped with the offload back into their real bodies. A G20 Summit that sees the world leaders converge in Athens further complicate matters – as an international cabal targets the very summit to take out these guys including President Of The United States– thus effectively plunging the world into complete chaos. Tin Men decide to haul ass to Athens – with their priority being to protect their commander-in-chief. From here on, the tension levels ratchet up to dizzying levels – the suspense hot, the action non-stop. The shoot ‘em up never lets up, the bullets and rockets are flying all over the place, shrapnel slices into skin, the tin carapace is charred – and in the middle of all this, the Tin Men soldier on. The primary focus is on the soldiers of Platoon A – Danny Kelso, private – a man without attachments in this world (A lone shark who continues to swim in the waters of the world unattached) and Kate Wade – a paraplegic who has lost her legs in real life but is the Queen of the Tin Men in her metallic bot-body - are the main POVs. Christopher does a commendable job of getting the reader closer to the human frailties locked deep within those tin canisters - connecting us to the real people behind that unbreakable façade. There are various others – the maverick Mavrides, Hawkins the soldier with his unshakeable ethics, Travaglini the loyal side-kick and many more. Not all of them survive the bullet-riddled kinetic power-ride to the end. Meanwhile giving us the human side of things are Felix Wade, chief economic advisor to the president- also estranged father to Kate – looking for a way to survive the madness that has engulfed the world and make it right with his daughter, one last time. Alexa Day – is a seventeen year old on vacation to Damascus to meet up with her father, American ambassador stationed in Syria when all hell breaks loose. On the other side of the fence, we also get Hanif Khan – the man on a crazed mission to wreck damage and exact personal revenge against the bots for having killed his family. Then there is Aimee Sharp, a tech staff within the military base fighting hard to ensure it doesn’t get infiltrated by inside traitors. Kate is such a strong protagonist that you cannot help but cheer. Danny plays a man conflicted by his phobia to commit to any relation but finds redemption at the end – in the middle of flying bullets and screeching rockets. Frankly though he is bit of a bore and relies on other stronger characters around him to find his roots in this mad world. Alexa would have been a fantastic character to build out but she is in the side-lines while the Tin Men fight it out to get to Athens. But it’s probably her character-arc that sees a sea-change by the end of the book and fittingly so. But if you ask me to pick a Tin-Man I loved, that would be Hawkins. A man you can trust to have your back always. The start of the book is a bit slow. Where the author slowly sets things in motion around the military base. But once the Tin Men are up and about – stationed in Damascus, the tension levels in the lonely markets of Syria are what suck you in. The mayhem is never-ending. And Christopher pelts the readers non-stop with grenades, rockets and bullets singing through the ride. All the way from Syria to Athens to Germany. And yes – there is a story behind, that forces questions around the role of US playing the world police-man, will that be in the best interests of the rest of the world? Will it lead to unrest and riots in the longer run? A scarily plausible future – one that is brought out in full technicolour and painted a rambunctious red drenched in blood and bullets by Christopher Golden – this man knows how to get your pulse racing immersing you in a believable world lived in by robots who are more than humans. A military science-fiction that hits all the right spots and forces you to think. A roaring good tale of shining valour that stands out amidst the screaming rockets, this one should be on the big screen. And soon.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Faith

    In this book, American remote infantry (robot) combat units have been deployed all over the world to keep the peace, but instead have increased the hatred of anarchists and Islamists directed at America in particular and the Western world in general. The anarchists plan, generally, to put all technology in the world out of commission and, specifically, to destroy all of the robots. They probably didn't think this plan through very well. The operation of the robots is sort of a rip-off of the mo In this book, American remote infantry (robot) combat units have been deployed all over the world to keep the peace, but instead have increased the hatred of anarchists and Islamists directed at America in particular and the Western world in general. The anarchists plan, generally, to put all technology in the world out of commission and, specifically, to destroy all of the robots. They probably didn't think this plan through very well. The operation of the robots is sort of a rip-off of the movie Avatar. In Germany where the action begins there is a cliched collection of soldiers who remain asleep in Germany while they somehow telepathically man the robots stationed worldwide. These include the ladies men, the hero, a disabled soldier, gruff sergeant, tech whiz kid and beautiful (why always beautiful?) female soldier. Later they add a plucky teenager to their group for the YA market. In Germany there is also a group of soldiers and technicians who remotely oversee the missions of the robots. The remainder of the action takes place in Athens, the sight of an economic conference. The only part of the book that really interested me was the part about the technicians in Germany but there wasn't very much of that. The rest of the book was just a lot of running and shooting. I could see this as a movie with lots of gunfire and explosions and cool robots, but for me it was not a great book. Usually when I say a book should be made into a movie I mean it as a compliment. That is not the case with this book. I am not a fan of military thrillers and I found most of the book, particularly the parts in Damascus, extremely tedious. The gun battles were numerous and unending. I was hoping for more of an intelligent techno-thriller or sci fi story, but I probably didn't read the description of the book carefully enough. For fans of military thrillers this book might be ok. Maybe they want to read something like "Danny rose to his knees, reached out and picked up her scorched, severed arm, then handed it to her" but I wasn't enthralled. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher.

  7. 5 out of 5

    John D. Harvey

    In short ... I couldn’t put it down. If that’s all you need to know, then go ahead and buy it now. But, if not … “Tin Men” represents Christopher Golden’s first foray (to my knowledge) into the genre of a futuristic military thriller, and provides a solid, action-driven plot that explores a possible future for modern ground warfare through the eyes of a wide range of characters in multiple settings. Taking place in the not-so-distant future, soldiers in America’s Remote Infantry Corps link their mi In short ... I couldn’t put it down. If that’s all you need to know, then go ahead and buy it now. But, if not … “Tin Men” represents Christopher Golden’s first foray (to my knowledge) into the genre of a futuristic military thriller, and provides a solid, action-driven plot that explores a possible future for modern ground warfare through the eyes of a wide range of characters in multiple settings. Taking place in the not-so-distant future, soldiers in America’s Remote Infantry Corps link their minds directly to super-soldier robot counterparts and carry out missions across the world. Operating without the fear of death, these “drone pilots” prove to be more than a match for essentially all terrorist and insurgent enemies. And the Remote Infantry has no shortage of foes. This is a world declining into chaos through a combination of political, social, and environmental factors. Radical activist and terror networks use both technology and increasing broad public resentment against U.S. forces to fuel an ambiguous but violent insurgency. When the world suffers a nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) attack that knocks the entire planet’s infrastructure back to the 18th century, members of the Remote Infantry Corps come to some sobering realizations about themselves, their world, and both the government and technology in which they placed their trust. “Tin Men” focuses on a squad of soldiers (and specifically PFC Denny Kelso and Corporal Kate Wade) battling increasingly impossible odds as they attempt travel from Pakistan to their home base in Germany. In addition to challenges within their own ranks, Kelso and Wade match both wits and firepower against violent fanatics who pursue them with a new bot-killing weapon. The marketing blurb from publisher Ballantine Books links Golden’s “Tin Men” to the writing of Brad Thor (specifically, “Brad Thor meets Avatar…”). This is misleading. My opinion is that Golden is a vastly better writer than Thor. I’ll also note that Thor’s very conservative politics play a prominent, heavy-handed role in his novels. In contrast, Golden spends less time politically soapboxing his fiction, and when he does it’s more subtle and nuanced. Nonetheless, when Golden lifts the veil, he reveals himself as being more left-of-center. For example, though it’s never said how far into the future the story takes place, it posits that one of the reasons for increasing global chaos is the catastrophic effects of climate change. This will not please conservative climate-change skeptics in the reading world. “Tin Men” also takes a several beats inside of all the action to offer multiple perspectives (and some not flattering…) on the U.S. military’s continuous state of warfare since September 11, 2001, as well as how the “War on Terror” is perceived by those outside the United States. “Tin Men” has a few blemishes mixed in with its many strengths. For readers seeking a hard-science techno-thriller, you’ll be disappointed. Most of the tech in “Tin Men” falls into that Star Trek oeuvre of stuff that works … well … just because it does. There are also instances where, if you take a breath during the non-stop action, you may pause long enough to ask “Wait. If they can do X, then why don’t they just do Y to prevent Z badness from happening?” Also, there’s something of a love story that feels spackled in, as they often do in action-thriller novels. Then again, I may not be much of a romantic. That’s on me. Whether or not these minor flaws prevent you from enjoying the novel depends on your ability to set aside a few foibles in the interest of reading a fun, fast-paced novel. I had no problem with any of it and enthusiastically recommend “Tin Men”.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Janell

    Tin Men is one of the better books that I have read this year. It grabs you from the first page and doesn't let go until you have read the very last word. It is set in the very near future and instead of drones being used for the world's trouble spots, the USA uses robots that are super strong, smart and highly intelligent and are run by real people who are in cubicles who are in suspended animation and their minds are placed in these robots. Very sci fi by not heavy on the technical dialog. The Tin Men is one of the better books that I have read this year. It grabs you from the first page and doesn't let go until you have read the very last word. It is set in the very near future and instead of drones being used for the world's trouble spots, the USA uses robots that are super strong, smart and highly intelligent and are run by real people who are in cubicles who are in suspended animation and their minds are placed in these robots. Very sci fi by not heavy on the technical dialog. The story is very quick paced and there is tons of action along with some twists and turns and is very well written. I am a first time reader of Christopher Golden and I liked what I read with his style of writing. The only thing that I wish is that the story would be continued in another book or perhaps a trilogy. There is still a lot to explore in a new world without technology or power due to an EMP and would make great reading. I definitely will be recommending this book to others as it is a very good book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bracken

    To say this book is propulsive is an understatement. TIN MEN starts at full throttle and doesn't let up until the last page. Christopher Golden hits the character high notes you expect from him while also showing that he's got powerful action-thriller chops. This story nails the summer blockbuster/beach read perfectly while also taking an intelligent look at American hegemony and military interventionism without being preachy or condescending. It's smart and, more importantly, FUN. This book is To say this book is propulsive is an understatement. TIN MEN starts at full throttle and doesn't let up until the last page. Christopher Golden hits the character high notes you expect from him while also showing that he's got powerful action-thriller chops. This story nails the summer blockbuster/beach read perfectly while also taking an intelligent look at American hegemony and military interventionism without being preachy or condescending. It's smart and, more importantly, FUN. This book is a finely-tuned machine operating at peak performance just like its titular warriors. TIN MEN is Christopher Golden at the very top of his game! My only disappointment is knowing there is no sequel (yet).

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    I had this book on my radar for a little while. This is one book that I was looking forward to checking out. Well I can tell you that while this book was good, it did not live up to the hype that I held for it. I was uick readut I culd not fully find a connection with any of the characters in this book. Thus without this connection, I found myself at times just going through the motions without excitement. In fact, I can not remember many of the details of the events that took place through out I had this book on my radar for a little while. This is one book that I was looking forward to checking out. Well I can tell you that while this book was good, it did not live up to the hype that I held for it. I was uick readut I culd not fully find a connection with any of the characters in this book. Thus without this connection, I found myself at times just going through the motions without excitement. In fact, I can not remember many of the details of the events that took place through out this book. Yet, I did still like the premise of this book and if I had been able to find myself more into it then I know that I would have rated it higher.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Scott Bell

    A good read if you can suspend disbelief over the technology. I kept wondering why the Tin Men had no armament more powerful than a sidearm. Several questions of this nature kept me from fully immersing. Golden keeps the action flowing and the stakes high throughout, which makes it a good page-turner.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen (QueenKatieMae)

    Years from now, when global warming has flooded the coastlines and drought create international food shortages; the world population will revolt and riot against their governments. When the leaders of the world are unable to control the chaos, who will step in to police the masses? In Christopher Golden’s new novel, Tin Men, America will intervene, and we will have an army of robots. Drones will be a thing of the past and we will send these 7 foot-tall, indestructible, boots on the ground soldie Years from now, when global warming has flooded the coastlines and drought create international food shortages; the world population will revolt and riot against their governments. When the leaders of the world are unable to control the chaos, who will step in to police the masses? In Christopher Golden’s new novel, Tin Men, America will intervene, and we will have an army of robots. Drones will be a thing of the past and we will send these 7 foot-tall, indestructible, boots on the ground soldiers instead. And the world will hate us for it. Similar to the movie Avatar, these Tin Men are brain powered by men and women safely encapsulated in tubes stationed in Germany and remote controlled throughout the world. Private Danny Kelso begins his day crawling into his tube and his infantry robot comes to life in Damascus. The Tin Men look like huge metallic humans complete with facial features and they are locked and loaded. However, on this day a faction of anarchists instigates a worldwide assault that levels the playing field and the world is slammed back to the Stone Age. No electricity, no computers, no satellites, no phones. The Tin Men, however, still function but they are trapped in their robots while their human forms remain in Germany. I don’t read much Sci-Fi, and I rarely read military thrillers with the army saving the world, so this was an interesting departure for me. The book just drips with testosterone, lots of patriotic feel good, and tons of firefights. Even though the book focuses on a couple of main characters and a handful of minor players it was hard for me to connect with anyone. The writer includes the presidents of two major powers trying to get to safety, which was exciting but very predictable. A traitor who has infiltrated the German base is pretty easy to pick out of a crowd. The leader of the faction who instigated the attack is frequently referred to an anarchist, never a terrorist, which I found interesting. And, for some odd reason, there is a 17 year-old female civilian character involved with the Tin Men’s platoon. I don’t know, maybe this is standard for military thrillers but I wasn’t that impressed with the book and found myself skimming towards the end. I also got annoyed every time the story used the words “Bot Killers” and anarchists. I know this author has a huge fan base and they will love this new offering but it just wasn’t my cup of tea.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Agnieszka "Aeth" Jędrzejczyk

    This book was everything I needed just when I needed it: a fast-paced military-style futuristic action adventure, with just the right balance between action and character development. Things happen, and a lot of them, but they're meaningful and have impact and they drive everybody forward. I also love the fact that the story takes place in a sort of pumped-up version of the world's current realities, though I admit, it could use a little less of moralizing (which were evident especially toward t This book was everything I needed just when I needed it: a fast-paced military-style futuristic action adventure, with just the right balance between action and character development. Things happen, and a lot of them, but they're meaningful and have impact and they drive everybody forward. I also love the fact that the story takes place in a sort of pumped-up version of the world's current realities, though I admit, it could use a little less of moralizing (which were evident especially toward the end) and a little more background. The ending itself could use a bit more polish - it does feel a bit rushed, as people before me noticed - but I can't lie, I enjoyed this ride very very much. It reads like a movie: I practically had movie frames in my eyes the whole time. So if you're into a good action story with great scenes and a breathing room for characters, give it a shot!

  14. 4 out of 5

    A Reader's Heaven

    (I received a free copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.) Economies are collapsing, environmental disasters are widespread and war the backdrop to life. And so the military has developed a force of elite soldiers to keep the peace. A force like nothing seen before ... codenamed Tin Man, soldiers are virtually transported to inhabit robot frames in war-torn countries. When PFC Danny Kelso starts his day shift in Syria, an eerie silence welcomes him and a patrol confirms (I received a free copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.) Economies are collapsing, environmental disasters are widespread and war the backdrop to life. And so the military has developed a force of elite soldiers to keep the peace. A force like nothing seen before ... codenamed Tin Man, soldiers are virtually transported to inhabit robot frames in war-torn countries. When PFC Danny Kelso starts his day shift in Syria, an eerie silence welcomes him and a patrol confirms the area is totally deserted. But when a rogue electromagnetic pulse throws everything into darkness, Danny's conscious mind is trapped within his robot body. The attack turns out to have been global - the world is facing a return to the dark ages with no electricity, no technology ... no safe zones. And the Tin Men face a race against time to save not only themselves but society as we know it. "Suspension of disbelief" was pretty much my mantra throughout this book. Also, "Stop comparing this to a bunch of movies..." This was a book that was hard to take too seriously based on those two thoughts... Did I enjoy it? Absolutely - the real "macho" stuff worked pretty well. Gunfights, explosions, all that cool stuff that we read this genre for. Plenty of sci-fi to keep those readers happy too. But what I did miss was the logic. There were times that just made me scratch my head and wonder - using a rifle scope, for instance, when surely their helmets would have had that feature...surely? Little things like that popped up now and then and left me feeling disappointed... Paul ARH

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nick Kopsian

    I did really like this book! I found myself looking forward to my lunch breaks and train rides home to jump back into this book. This is not the genre of novel Christopher Golden normally writes in, but it was so well done! It’s the story of the U.S.’s army of human piloted robots, which is a very possible future, but I want to put the emphasis on “human piloted”. All the characters we meet are well fleshed out and the ones you think you have pegged as a generic “type” are anything but. It is ac I did really like this book! I found myself looking forward to my lunch breaks and train rides home to jump back into this book. This is not the genre of novel Christopher Golden normally writes in, but it was so well done! It’s the story of the U.S.’s army of human piloted robots, which is a very possible future, but I want to put the emphasis on “human piloted”. All the characters we meet are well fleshed out and the ones you think you have pegged as a generic “type” are anything but. It is action packed and full of amazing story beats. I highly recommend this book, even if this type of book is normally not your cup of tea.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    As a fan of Science Fiction, I found this book to be enjoyable. I liked how the POV is switched around a lot, which shows how each character is dealing with the effects of the EMPs. Most of the characters were notable, but some were hard to keep track of. The robot soldiers used in the book are capable of forming facial expressions, which was disappointing because most other books do the same thing, and it would have been nice to see something new brought to the table.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rebeca

    This book came so close to getting a five star rating from me--purely because of subjective reasons. I love military sci-fi. I love robots in all shapes and sizes. And I loved these characters. I don't often get the chance to say this, but this book had badass characters everywhere. It's got a soldier struggling with his feelings but fighting to survive. Badass women taking the spotlight, from a 17 year old girl left stranded and (view spoiler)[ orphaned (hide spoiler)] to a disabled woman of co This book came so close to getting a five star rating from me--purely because of subjective reasons. I love military sci-fi. I love robots in all shapes and sizes. And I loved these characters. I don't often get the chance to say this, but this book had badass characters everywhere. It's got a soldier struggling with his feelings but fighting to survive. Badass women taking the spotlight, from a 17 year old girl left stranded and (view spoiler)[ orphaned (hide spoiler)] to a disabled woman of color who is often left to question the blurring line between man and machine. And an awesome anarchist sniper from the other side of the war. This book just kept building and building and I was loving every second of it. Every time Kate, Alexa, or Khan took over the narrative, I wanted to read more and more of those three. Which could be a negative at times. It often made me stop and wonder why exactly Danny was the main character. He's not bad, but his only real conflict is being incapable of admitting his feelings for the woman he truly loves. Kate, Alexa, and Khan have real arcs, far more complicated and volatile. Those three are the ones who get to explore the full conflicts of war, of loss, and of what this technological achievement really means for humanity. It can be a powerful book, but in a way, that's why the last couple chapters started to disappoint. It really only comes down to one moment and, unfair as it is to say, it did mildly ruin things for me. (view spoiler)[ When the narrative just discarded Khan and killed him in a page, never to be mentioned again, it left a sour taste in my mouth. I get that he was the bad guy, technically, but he was interesting. He was the chance this book had to make the conflict far more complex and morally grey than what the Tin Men wanted it to be, but even though the book started on that path, it quickly fell away from it. (hide spoiler)] It's not a book that's perfect. The world building and characterization is a bit rushed at the beginning and because of the way it mirrors real-life, present conflicts, I don't know how certain people will take to the parallels. I didn't have too much of a problem on them, but I could somewhat see where there were some unfortunate implications. Ultimately, however, it hit enough sweet spots that I wanted to keep reading. And I enjoyed it the whole way through.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    This is really a 3.5. I received a free copy in exchange for an honest review. When I picked up Tin Men by Christopher Golden, I was so ready for it. I mean I was frothing at the teeth. I hadn’t read military science fiction in quite a while and it was about time that I got something new. On the surface, Tin Men was relevant and interesting. When you dug down deeper it had some interesting character evolution going on. I walked awy from the novel feeling satisfied. It hit the itch just right, maki This is really a 3.5. I received a free copy in exchange for an honest review. When I picked up Tin Men by Christopher Golden, I was so ready for it. I mean I was frothing at the teeth. I hadn’t read military science fiction in quite a while and it was about time that I got something new. On the surface, Tin Men was relevant and interesting. When you dug down deeper it had some interesting character evolution going on. I walked awy from the novel feeling satisfied. It hit the itch just right, making me so content with the experience. Tin Men is a novel that really ran with the near future what if. What if the US really did step further into the world police role? What if we found a way to do that more safely with our soldiers commanding remote infantry robots? What if other countries and groups of people got sick of the US trying to police everyone and maintain the peace? And most importantly what if they did something so drastic to stop it that it sent the whole world into chaos? That is what Tin men is really exploring and it does it well. Ultimately, I really enjoyed the book. The characters were interesting. While it wrapped itself up nicely, it also left itself open just enough that I could see a potential sequel. Given the state of the world at the end of the novel, I would be interested to see what happens next. I may not have fallen in love with the story, but I did enjoy it and would definitely read the next book in the series should there be one. For the full review check it out on my blog: full review

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bestselling Thrillers

    TIN MEN by Christopher Golden 4 Stars A gripping read that begins on the day the world fell apart. This intriguing book starts by explaining how the world fell into chaos and the aftermath. It then further explains how the U.S. created ‘TIN MEN‘ to keep some kind of control and order in our failing societies. These ‘TIN MEN’ are remote infantry soldiers that are like ‘Soldiers of the future’, where they are kept safe in ‘canisters’ at an army base in Germany. The actual robotic soldiers they contr TIN MEN by Christopher Golden 4 Stars A gripping read that begins on the day the world fell apart. This intriguing book starts by explaining how the world fell into chaos and the aftermath. It then further explains how the U.S. created ‘TIN MEN‘ to keep some kind of control and order in our failing societies. These ‘TIN MEN’ are remote infantry soldiers that are like ‘Soldiers of the future’, where they are kept safe in ‘canisters’ at an army base in Germany. The actual robotic soldiers they control, we first encounter on patrol in Damascus. Platoon A soon realise that something sinister is imminent… There are different stories unfolding in various parts of the world, such as in Greece at the G20 summit, where numerous world leaders are present and also in Syria, with the daughter of the U.S. ambassador at the U.S. embassy. We meet engaging characters throughout the book and follow their struggles to survive after an ‘EMP.’ Anarchy has begun… This engrossing read pulls you in and takes you on an extremely fast paced journey, where you begin to believe there may be hope after all. I found this compelling book hard to put down, as there never seemed to be a ‘quiet’ moment. I would highly recommend it and hope that there is more to follow… Elphaba Best Selling Crime Thrillers were given an advanced copy of the book to review

  20. 4 out of 5

    J

    Christopher Golden's Tin Men feels like a mid-summer science fiction action blockbuster film. There's action, a bit of suspense, obvious good and bad guys, and a sort of predictable shallowness with an attempt at making the characters distinct and interesting with some kind of back story. The book is more fun than substance with a slightly out there futuristic military scenario. The US has a program that puts soldiers in control of robotic bodies in the Middle East to keep the peace and things g Christopher Golden's Tin Men feels like a mid-summer science fiction action blockbuster film. There's action, a bit of suspense, obvious good and bad guys, and a sort of predictable shallowness with an attempt at making the characters distinct and interesting with some kind of back story. The book is more fun than substance with a slightly out there futuristic military scenario. The US has a program that puts soldiers in control of robotic bodies in the Middle East to keep the peace and things go wrong pretty quickly. From there it's action sequences and jumping around between three locations where important things are happening. There are a lot of names tossed about and it can be frustrating to keep track of who is who and where since a number of the characters are predictably cannon fodder. Tin Men is more of a fun, quick summer action read in the end. It's not particularly deep and it doesn't really add a new perspective to current events, but Tin Men rolls on to a rushed yet moderately satisfying conclusion. Note: ARC received via Amazon Vine in exchange for review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Conal

    I received this book in a first reads giveaway here on GoodReads. This was a fun near future story about drone controlled robots used as peace keepers though out the world by the US. The author has thrown in some curve balls and the story did not always follow what I expected to happen. Overall, this was a entertaining story that I was able to finish in a couple of sittings. The main characters were well developed and it had a satisfying ending. The author has left open several plot points so I e I received this book in a first reads giveaway here on GoodReads. This was a fun near future story about drone controlled robots used as peace keepers though out the world by the US. The author has thrown in some curve balls and the story did not always follow what I expected to happen. Overall, this was a entertaining story that I was able to finish in a couple of sittings. The main characters were well developed and it had a satisfying ending. The author has left open several plot points so I expect that there will be a sequel or two somewhere down the line. 4 stars for a fun read. recommended for fan of near future sci-fi.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    Now this was a ride through pages of non stop action. With near future premise of the United States keeping peace around the world. That future isn't that far off, with what is going on in the world today. Christopher Golden has nailed it. As I was drawn deeper into the story, I was reminded of the U.S. in similar police actions, as with Korea and Vietnam. With a group called anarchists, trying to stop the good.This definitely should be on the big screen, and I see video games. Grab this book and Now this was a ride through pages of non stop action. With near future premise of the United States keeping peace around the world. That future isn't that far off, with what is going on in the world today. Christopher Golden has nailed it. As I was drawn deeper into the story, I was reminded of the U.S. in similar police actions, as with Korea and Vietnam. With a group called anarchists, trying to stop the good.This definitely should be on the big screen, and I see video games. Grab this book and go. .

  23. 4 out of 5

    David Dalton

    I enjoyed this action sci-fi thriller. Tin Men are remote control robots. Controlled from far away, but with the person's mind imprint in the Tin Men. A dark look at the US and the world. The Tin Men are America's answer to any problem world wide. Then comes along a world wide event and the world is suddenly without power (and it won't be coming back on soon). More to this, but I do not want to give things away. Lots of action, science gone wild, and political events. The start of a series of boo I enjoyed this action sci-fi thriller. Tin Men are remote control robots. Controlled from far away, but with the person's mind imprint in the Tin Men. A dark look at the US and the world. The Tin Men are America's answer to any problem world wide. Then comes along a world wide event and the world is suddenly without power (and it won't be coming back on soon). More to this, but I do not want to give things away. Lots of action, science gone wild, and political events. The start of a series of books about the Tin Men? Count me in!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Nichol

    This is a first-rate military Sci-Fi thriller. What if the US Army's elite robot soldiers find their minds trapped inside their bots after an EMP wipes out electronics world-wide? Christopher Golden answers that question flawlessly in this tale of anarchy supreme, survival and the fight to restore order. And the soldiers follow their orders despite the fact they may never get to return to their bodies again. Highly recommended.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Aildiin

    Interesting mix of speculative fiction and thriller. In the near future, the USA has started to use remotely controlled robots instead of human soldiers to police the world. They are deployed in Syria, Israel and other hot spots. Not everyone however is fan of them. The execution could have been better but overall it was a fun book even if in my view the last 20% was a bit rushed.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Maurice Leahy

    It's not a new idea as such, plot wise like, but hell its well done. Tore through it. Lots of potential for a series here and i for am hoping thats where it's going.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Scribbling-Wren

    Really exciting read. Needs to be made into a film.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    Military sci-fi in a near-future world where the USA has perfected it's drone/robot programs (the "Tin Soldiers") to the point of making any other military force obsolete. This is basically the movie "Avatar" with robot bodies. The USA then dives completely into the concept of being the "world police" - creating planet wide political stability, but that the cost of widening the rich-poor divide and completely subjugating those without power. The down-trodden lash out in a world-changing way. And Military sci-fi in a near-future world where the USA has perfected it's drone/robot programs (the "Tin Soldiers") to the point of making any other military force obsolete. This is basically the movie "Avatar" with robot bodies. The USA then dives completely into the concept of being the "world police" - creating planet wide political stability, but that the cost of widening the rich-poor divide and completely subjugating those without power. The down-trodden lash out in a world-changing way. And it's not good for anybody. I really love a story with logical, thought out universe-building rules... if "A" was to happen; "B" and "C" would, of course, follow. The author is really good at this and so I'll likely seek out his other books. Too bad this looks like its his only entry in the military sci-fi genre (so far). My only complaints here are with few plot points ... (view spoiler)[The down-trodden basically decide to destroy the world as we know it to upset the world order. They couldn't do this without significant "world power" help, right? It's not like ISIS is all of a sudden going to take over world-wide satellites without inside help. Not sure who was helping them. Likewise, I didn't get the motivation of North, the Tin Man turned bad. PTSD I guess, but that didn't seem like a good enough excuse. Also, the choice to drag around the main bad guy along with a teen-aged girl seemed just like a device to keep tension in the story. I can't see soldiers on the ground actually making that call. Finally, "transferring consciousness" into the robot bodies? Not buying it. Maybe making a copy would be more believable? That would setup some interesting story arcs... "robot Danny" vs. "human Danny". Who is the real Danny? Ethics of just shutting down robot Danny? Too bad that story-line wasn't followed. (hide spoiler)] All that said, an entertaining page turner. Glad I picked it up.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alex Murphy

    Tin Men is a futuristic action story, filled with terrorists, EMPs, robots and war fighting from Syria to Germany via Israel and Greece. I’ve read one of Christopher Golden’s novels before (Dead Ringers), and that was pretty decent. This really is no different. In the near-ish future, with the world racked by global warming, resource shortages, economic hardship and international destabilising terrorism; to try to keep the peace, the US, deploys its Remote Infantry Unit; robotic drone like machine Tin Men is a futuristic action story, filled with terrorists, EMPs, robots and war fighting from Syria to Germany via Israel and Greece. I’ve read one of Christopher Golden’s novels before (Dead Ringers), and that was pretty decent. This really is no different. In the near-ish future, with the world racked by global warming, resource shortages, economic hardship and international destabilising terrorism; to try to keep the peace, the US, deploys its Remote Infantry Unit; robotic drone like machines that are controlled virtually by solders back at base (you know…like in Avatar). With these deployed all over the world to try and keep the peace, and during a massive G20 conference in Athens, the worlds terrorists have joined forces and unleashed a massive EMP blast turning off all the world’s electronics. This traps the soldier’s consciousness inside their robots. Which means that if their robot dies, they die too. So now a unit of RIU’s in Syria are surrounded by terrorists and are in a race to get back to their base in Germany to get back into their flesh and blood bodies. This isn’t a bad book, the writing flows well and is easy to read and doesn’t drag. The action is fast paced and well-paced. The characters; Danny, Kate, Alexa, Aimee, Felix etc fit well into the story and given just enough to make them compelling enough. If this was a movie it would be an above average sci-fi action film, but with nothing really to make it stand out. A book that I enjoyed reading but there are others that I’d recommend before this.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Valarauco

    Cover Ansich finde ich es ist ein interessantes und ansprechendes Cover. Mich irritiert allerdings das menschliche Gesicht in dem Kampfroboter. Das passt so überhaupt nicht zu der Beschreibung des Autors. Es ist auf jeden Fall ein Bild, das einem sofort ins Auge springt, vor allem mit all den zum Teil hellen (fast schon grellen) Farben deinen starken Kontrast zum Roboter und der Skyline bilden. Meine Meinung Gleich vorneweg möchte ich sagen, dieses Buch hat mich aus meiner Komfortzone gezerrt, denn Cover Ansich finde ich es ist ein interessantes und ansprechendes Cover. Mich irritiert allerdings das menschliche Gesicht in dem Kampfroboter. Das passt so überhaupt nicht zu der Beschreibung des Autors. Es ist auf jeden Fall ein Bild, das einem sofort ins Auge springt, vor allem mit all den zum Teil hellen (fast schon grellen) Farben deinen starken Kontrast zum Roboter und der Skyline bilden. Meine Meinung Gleich vorneweg möchte ich sagen, dieses Buch hat mich aus meiner Komfortzone gezerrt, denn es gehört definitiv nicht zu meinem üblichen Lesestoff. Ich liebe Dystopien und Fantasy, aber mit Science-Fiction kann ich normalerweise nur sehr wenig anfangen. Doch jetzt erst ein Mal zum Buch: Die Hauptfigur ist Danny Kelso, ein junger amerikanischer Soldat, der in Wiesbaden stationiert ist. Dort gehört er zu einer der Tin-Men-Einheiten. Das sind Roboter, die auf dem ganzen Globus verstreut sind und für Frieden sorgen. Hier möchte ich gleich einwerfen, wie unglaublich komisch ich es fand, das die Kommandozentrale der Roboter in Wiesbaden war. Beim ersten Mal lesen war ich mir gar nicht sicher, ob ich die Textstelle richtig gelesen hatte. Jedes Mal wenn der Name der Stadt genannt wurde, musste ich wieder grinsen. Das hat einfach nicht so richtig dazu gepasst zu der Geschichte. Danny gefällt sein Job. Er nicht das Leben trotz aller Katastrophen nicht zu ernst und lebt vor sich hin. Als es jedoch einen Anschlag gibt, der jegliche Kommunikation unterbindet, wird es auch für ihn auf einmal ernst. Er ist mit seinem Roboter in Damaskus stationiert. Zusammen mit seiner Einheit versucht er, zurück nach Wiesbaden zu kommen. Jedoch müssen auch die Verantwortlichen festgenommen werden. Danny begibt sich mit seinen Teammitgliedern auf eine gefährliche Reise. Wobei, so gefährlich ist sie dann doch nicht, denn die Tin-Men sind beinahe unzerstörbar. Es gibt einen Punkt, den man allerdings drei Mal treffen muss, trotzdem schaffen es die Terroristen, einige Roboter auszuschalten. Anstatt Mitleid zu empfinden, war ich beinahe schon begeistert. Die Selbstbeweihräucherung der Amerikaner hat mich bereits in den ersten Sätzen des Buches so gestört, das ich es am liebsten Weg gelegt hätte. Mir ist durchaus bewusst, dass die Amerikaner sich gerne als Retter der Welt darstellen und als Friedensbringer, doch das sind sie mit Sicherheit nicht. Auch der amerikanische Autor lässt es in seinem Buch so klingen, als hätte Amerika sich erbarmt und würde für Frieden auf der Welt sorgen. Doch die Kriege toben weiter und irgendwie funktioniert das mit dem Frieden nicht so wirklich. Der Gefangene der Truppe um Danny Kelso bringt ein paar interessante Denkansätze, die alle darauf abzielen, dass die westliche Welt sich aus den Angelegenheiten des Orients heraushalten soll. Inwieweit dass nun optimal ist oder nicht, will ich gar nicht entscheiden, dennoch fand ich diese Seite des Buches interessant und war auch erstaunt darüber, dass der Autor hier etwas Derartiges erwähnt. Eine Textstelle zu Beginn des Buches hat es mir besonders angetan: Fernseher wären tot. Telefone. Keine Kinofilme mehr. Kein Internet. Mein Gott, dachte Danny. Kein Internet. Sämtliche Daten, die dort gespeichert waren, alle Bücher und Zeitschriften … das gesamte Wissen … das nicht auf Papier gedruckt worden war… alles würde für immer verschwunden sein. Es war, als ob die Bibliothek von Alexandria die ganze Welt eingeschlossen hätte und von deisen verdammten Anarchisten, in deren Diensten Hanif Kahn stand, niedergebrannt worden sei. – Seite 195, Krieg der Maschinen von Christopher Golden Diese Stelle ist meiner Meinung nach eine der Besten und Sinnvollsten des Buches. Im Laufe der Zeit lernt man neben Danny noch weitere Figuren kennen. Zum Beispiel wäre da Corporal Kate Wade. Sie ist eine junge Soldatin, die im Krieg schon ihre Beine verloren hat. Durch die Tin Men kann sie jedoch wieder aktiv Kämpfen und eine “ganz normale” Soldatin sein. Sie führt den Zug von Danny nach Athen. Dort will sie ihren Vater Retten, der als Berater des Präsidenten bei einer Konferenz ist. Ganz neben bei Retten sie natürlich auch den Präsidenten. Im Gepäck haben sie dabei zeitweise einen verletzten Anarchisten und die Tochter des Botschafters in Damaskus. Während die Soldaten sich nach Athen aufmachen, flüchtet der Präsident der Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika zusammen mit dem Vater von Kate Wade. Lustigerweise gehört ihrer kleinen Gruppe auch der russische Präsident an, der natürlich nicht nachgeben will und sehr stereotypisch dargestellt wird. Die Geschichte ihrer Flucht hat mich verhältnismäßig wenig interessiert. Ein dritter Handlungsstrang spielt in Wiesbaden (hier kindisches Gekicher einfügen). Dort wollen die Techniker herausfinden, wie sie alles wieder in Ordnung bringen. Außerdem kommt es zu einem Aufstand und es gibt Verrat. Ja, genau so abgebrüht und knapp wie ich das jetzt geschrieben habe, kam mir das Ganze vor. Es hat mich wenig interessiert und auch wenig berührt. Alle drei Handlungsstränge werden abwechselnd erzählt, interessant war für mich jedoch nur der um Danny. Schade fand ich die Tatsache, dass bis zur Abreise aus Damaskus alles Ewigkeiten gedauert hat, danach aber alles kaum schnell genug gehen konnte. Vor allem das Ende war mehr als enttäuschend. Ich möchte jetzt nicht zu viel verraten, aber ich saß vor dem Buch und hatte das Gefühl, der Autor wollte nur noch so schnell wie möglich fertig werden. Es war, als hätte er das Ende der Geschichte nur noch in kurzen Sätzen zusammengefasst. Ein weiterer Kritikpunkt sind die Anarchisten. Es gibt nur einen Anarchisten, mit dem man wirklich konfrontiert wird: Hanif Kahn. Er und seine Bot-Killer sind aber nicht einmal annähernd wichtig. Für Hanif Kahn hat die Aktion persönliche Gründe, die ich hier nicht weiter ausbreiten möchte. Es gibt allerdings keine höher gelegene Macht, die aktiv in die Geschichte eingebunden wird. Es wird zwar davon geredet, doch im Endeffekt tut man nichts dagegen. Mir kommt es teilweise so vor, als wäre dieses Buch nur der Anfang einer Geschichte, die nicht fertig erzählt und hastig beendet wurde. Abschließend kann ich sagen, dass ich dieses Buch öfter weglegen musst, aus dem einfachen Grund: Ich hätte mich sonst nur aufgeregt, vor allem über die Amerikaner, die machen mich wirklich wahnsinnig. Das Buch hat mich nicht wirklich gefesselt und ich bin sehr froh, dass ich es mir nur ausgeliehen und nicht selbst gekauft habe. Ich wurde überhaupt nicht überzeugt. Wertung (2/5) www.valaraucos-buchstabenmeer.com

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