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One of Modern Library's 100 Best Nonfiction Books of the Twentieth Century In this classic study of how people learned to retain vast stores of knowledge before the invention of the printed page, Frances A. Yates traces the art of memory from its treatment by Greek orators, through its Gothic transformations in the Middle Ages, to the occult forms it took in the Renaissance One of Modern Library's 100 Best Nonfiction Books of the Twentieth Century In this classic study of how people learned to retain vast stores of knowledge before the invention of the printed page, Frances A. Yates traces the art of memory from its treatment by Greek orators, through its Gothic transformations in the Middle Ages, to the occult forms it took in the Renaissance, and finally to its use in the seventeenth century. This book, the first to relate the art of memory to the history of culture as a whole, was revolutionary when it first appeared and continues to mesmerize readers with its lucid and revelatory insights.


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One of Modern Library's 100 Best Nonfiction Books of the Twentieth Century In this classic study of how people learned to retain vast stores of knowledge before the invention of the printed page, Frances A. Yates traces the art of memory from its treatment by Greek orators, through its Gothic transformations in the Middle Ages, to the occult forms it took in the Renaissance One of Modern Library's 100 Best Nonfiction Books of the Twentieth Century In this classic study of how people learned to retain vast stores of knowledge before the invention of the printed page, Frances A. Yates traces the art of memory from its treatment by Greek orators, through its Gothic transformations in the Middle Ages, to the occult forms it took in the Renaissance, and finally to its use in the seventeenth century. This book, the first to relate the art of memory to the history of culture as a whole, was revolutionary when it first appeared and continues to mesmerize readers with its lucid and revelatory insights.

30 review for The Art of Memory

  1. 5 out of 5

    Gustavo Offely

    Acho que foi na série O Mentalista que ouvi a expressão «palácio da memória» pela primeira vez (qualquer coisa sobre um pato de borracha, numa sala qualquer, para recordar outra coisa qualquer). Já era um especialista em esquecer coisas nessa altura, mas ainda me conseguia lembrar de ter lido parte dum livro em que Umberto Eco falava sobre mnemotécnica; não sei o nome do livro, nem sobre o que era, mas tem lá aquela história engraçada dum gajo que empregava (?) outro gajo para o lembrar da sua m Acho que foi na série O Mentalista que ouvi a expressão «palácio da memória» pela primeira vez (qualquer coisa sobre um pato de borracha, numa sala qualquer, para recordar outra coisa qualquer). Já era um especialista em esquecer coisas nessa altura, mas ainda me conseguia lembrar de ter lido parte dum livro em que Umberto Eco falava sobre mnemotécnica; não sei o nome do livro, nem sobre o que era, mas tem lá aquela história engraçada dum gajo que empregava (?) outro gajo para o lembrar da sua mortalidade (agora há apps para isso). Passou algum tempo. Ouvi outra vez a expressão na série Hannibal e devo ter procurado um documentário no youtube ou algo semelhante (um sinal de intenções sérias). Passou algum tempo. Li os livros de Thomas Harris em que ele refere este livro como base para o palácio da memória de Hannibal Lecter. Bom, desta vez decidi ler o livro e ver o que era, não me ia esquecer de... Quase um ano mais tarde, encontrei o livro no meu Kindle, por acaso, e comecei a ler. No fundo, é um livro sobre a procura de uma chave, a Clavis Magna, que ainda ninguém encontrou. Da memória usada para as ninharias onerosas da retórica até ao método científico de Bacon, vemos que se procura uma solução geral para problemas. A maioria quer só resolver todos os problemas (Bruno, Lulio, Leibniz, etc.), mas também há gente anormal que só quer resolver alguns (Cicero, Quintiliano, Aquino). Eu admiro os primeiros, compreendo os segundos e sou um dos terceiros.

  2. 4 out of 5

    gwayle

    This is a fascinating history of the "art of memory"--an imaginary, spatio-visual technique for storing vast amounts of information before the printed page. Imagine a building with which you are intimately familiar, with plenty of space and a logical sequence to the rooms. Now put vivid, lurid statues (preferably "corporeal similitudes" but objects also work) representing the concepts (or specifics) you want to remember in the rooms at appropriate intervals. When you want to remember something, This is a fascinating history of the "art of memory"--an imaginary, spatio-visual technique for storing vast amounts of information before the printed page. Imagine a building with which you are intimately familiar, with plenty of space and a logical sequence to the rooms. Now put vivid, lurid statues (preferably "corporeal similitudes" but objects also work) representing the concepts (or specifics) you want to remember in the rooms at appropriate intervals. When you want to remember something, walk through the "palace" in your memory and look at your sequential displays. From its roots in ancient Greece and Rome, the art underwent intriguing transformations: in the Middle Ages, it became a devotional technique for meditation on good acts and sins that will get you into various levels of hell, with their attendant punishments (Yates argues that Dante was much influenced by the art, also that all of that disturbing religious imagery of the time has everything to do with making images memorable). In its Renaissance incarnation, it melds with the Hermetic tradition to form a occultist tool for aligning yourself "magically" with the universe, thereby accessing the divine power that is the stuff of Man's pre-corporeal soul. The concluding two chapters are interesting though less convincing: the history of the art reveals the true structure of Shakespeare's Globe Theater, and it also influenced the development of the scientific method (just because Bacon and Leibniz were interested in the art and also made significant contributions to science and mathematics doesn't mean that their interest in the art had anything to do with their contributions). I came to this book after reading John Crowley's strange and memorable Little, Big ; the fascinating character Ariel Hawksquill is an adept at the art, having built vast, intricate, and magically potent memory palaces. Curiously, I've been drawn back to Crowley and his Aegypt cycle after reading this. I will definitely be reading more on this subject (hopefully nonfiction and fiction--suggestions?). In any case, apparently we all have Dame Yates to thank for any modern interest in it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    I was surprised at the readability of this. But, truthfully, I read it a few months ago and forgot most of what I think about it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    One thing that is impossible to fully grasp about the past is the fact that hundreds of years ago people had significantly different mental worlds to our own. Popular histories tend to entirely sidestep this in favour of drawing parallels and contrasts with current habits of life, while more academic history often struggles with the unwieldiness of explaining it. ‘The Art of Memory’ confronts the issue head on by telling the story of memory techniques used in classical, Medieval, and Renaissance One thing that is impossible to fully grasp about the past is the fact that hundreds of years ago people had significantly different mental worlds to our own. Popular histories tend to entirely sidestep this in favour of drawing parallels and contrasts with current habits of life, while more academic history often struggles with the unwieldiness of explaining it. ‘The Art of Memory’ confronts the issue head on by telling the story of memory techniques used in classical, Medieval, and Renaissance times. The art of memory essentially consists of teaching systematic ways to improve the performance of recall. What makes this art so hard to grasp now is that memory was the main reference at the time. Before the printing press, books were scarcely available and contacting other people very time-consuming. As has been recognised since classical times, the performance of human memory is partially innate (some people have better memories ‘naturally’) and partially a matter of use and training. To veer into anecdata, the memorisation of phone numbers has become a lost art since the advent of mobile phones. If there is no active need to remember strings of eleven numbers, you’re unlikely to do so. Likewise, if you don’t need to remember entire areas of academic knowledge because you can refer to books, why would you? Academic learning in the 21st century is still about memorisation, yes, but also a substantial amount of recalling key names, locations, and signposts. You need to know where to find the details, rather than remembering them all. By contrast, the classical art of memory involved the use of places (usually buildings) and ‘corporeal similitudes’ (imagined human figures) as shortcuts to the memorisation of knowledge in great detail. The basic idea was to slowly walk around an actual building, transpose it fully into your imagination, and populate this mental construct with a carefully sequenced series of images that were stimulating enough to remember and associate with specific pieces of information. Each image in the sequence could represent a concept or, incredibly, a single word. The latter approach is admittedly acknowledged to be much more difficult. What really amazes the (post?)modern reader, though, is to contemplate the scale of these memory places. They were apparently used by practitioners of the art to memorise speeches, books, legal cases, and the like. This blew my mind in particular because I have a very visual memory. I’ve instinctively used this basic technique of remembering items in a room when doing a memory experiment for someone’s research, and it works. However, all my life I’ve relied on books, and latterly the internet, to elaborate on and confirm what’s in my memory. Having a meticulously arranged library inside your brain seems like it would change your entire mode of thought, in ways I can only speculate on. At times when reading this book I wondered if I waste my visual memory by daydreaming beautiful mansions without making any effort to store information in them. Again, though, is there any need to? There are so many external forms of memory storage these days, both more and less fragile than our brains. Yates does not broach any of these issues, though, as the book was published in 1966 and concludes with Leibniz in the seventeenth century. It divides the art of memory into three broad eras, the classical, middle ages, and Renaissance. As I’m not at all familiar with the latter two periods, I found them more challenging and the concepts quite complex. Those chapters were richly rewarding, though, and Yates’ writing style is consistently clear and thoughtful. The Medieval and Renaissance manifestations of the memory arts were intertwined with religion and magic in ways subtle and obvious. The differences between the two are neatly summarised as follows: We come back here to that basic difference between the Middle Ages and Renaissance, the change in attitude to the imagination. From a lower power which may be used in memory as a concession to weak man who may use corporeal similitudes because only so can he retain his spiritual intentions to the corporeal world, it has become man’s highest power, by means of which he can grasp the intelligible world beyond appearances through laying hold of significant images. Perhaps the most striking chapters in the book concern Giordino Bruno’s extremely complex occult-suffused memory systems, which bring this mystical Renaissance tendency to apotheosis. Bruno is described by Yates as ‘the Magus of Memory’ and was eventually burnt at the stake by the Inquisition. In his many books, memory systems are a form of magic. They include concentric wheels with 150 divisions, the full meaning of which Yates believes ‘we shall never understand in detail’. Think about the effort involved in memorising such a thing - not merely as a static view of 150 images, but such that the wheels could spin and allow myriad new combinations. Moreover, the images were not literal, they represented what Bruno believed to be the fundamental elements that reality was made of. About halfway through ‘The Art of Memory’, I put it aside for a few days to read a fantasy novel called A Darker Shade of Magic. The contrast definitely enhanced my enjoyment of the latter half of this book. Consider, if you will, holding in your memory a complete visual representation of the world’s constitutive parts, which you can rearrange and manipulate at will. Is that not magic? It certainly has a strong air of the fantastical. As Yates puts it: Did [Bruno] intend that there would be formed in the memory using these ever-changing combinations of astral images some kind of alchemy of the imagination, a philosopher’s stone in the psyche through which every possible arrangement and combination of objects in the lower world - plants, animals, stones - would be perceived and remembered? And that, in accordance with the forming and reforming of the inventor’s images on the central wheel, the whole history of man would be remembered from above, as it were, all his discoveries, thoughts, philosophies, productions? Such a memory would be the memory of a divine man. [...] Magic assumes laws and forces running through the universe which the operator can use, once he knows how to capture them. [...] The Renaissance conception of an animistic universe, operated by magic, prepared the way for the conception of a mechanistic universe, operated by mathematics. This fascinating comparison brought to mind how Bruno’s systematisation of knowledge into interconnected categories prefigured the Enlightenment division of academic study into disciplines. These systems also seemed to invoke Borges - he was basically a Magus, so surely he must have been aware of them. The final chapters then turn to the association between the art of memory and theatres, notably Shakespeare’s Globe. This is especially piquant to read if you’ve visited the rebuilt Globe, which is a beautiful and evocative place. Yates asks how books on memory can help with the reconstruction of the Globe and reviews the evidence of how it looked. As I recall, the layout in the rebuilt version is very close to that arrived at. Here the book intersects with architecture, but it is fundamentally interdisciplinary, as the conclusion emphasises. Theology, pedagogy, and literature are all critical, while psychology underpins it throughout. That is part of what makes the study so elusive yet fascinating, as we can only speculate about how these memory palaces were actually experienced by their builders. I decided to read ‘The Art of Memory’ after finding an article about it online somewhere and, ironically, can’t remember where. The combination of detailed explanations and well-chosen illustrations makes for a deeply thought-provoking book, well worth lingering over.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Peter Mcloughlin

    a book on the lost art of memory. Before computers and storing everything in the cloud. At a time where a scrap of papyrus or sheepskin (the only things to write upon before printing and paper) cost around the equivalent of 20 dollars and a book cost about as much as a new car, today memory was the main medium of everyday knowledge. The art of memory goes back to Simonides although it has also been attributed to other Presocratic philosophers. Quintilian and Cicero are main sources of knowledge a book on the lost art of memory. Before computers and storing everything in the cloud. At a time where a scrap of papyrus or sheepskin (the only things to write upon before printing and paper) cost around the equivalent of 20 dollars and a book cost about as much as a new car, today memory was the main medium of everyday knowledge. The art of memory goes back to Simonides although it has also been attributed to other Presocratic philosophers. Quintilian and Cicero are main sources of knowledge for this ancient and vital art that have survived through the middle ages. There were two methods employed to remember vast amounts of material. The memory palace and ordering of knowledge were used usually in combination. The memory palace uses our spatial abilities by placing objects in places around a building that one knows from memory. The objects should be related to the material to be remembered. The images should be striking. They can be violent, ridiculous or lewd anything out of the ordinary that will stay in the mind. The ordering principle works around a schema that puts the materials in relevant categories in proper order. The book was really interesting. People in the middle ages and the renaissance looked upon memory with awe and looked on the art of memory as something bordering on the occult. The arcana of knowledge of the late middle ages and renaissance is fascinating as well. It was the string theory of cutting-edge theories of the cosmos and our place in it. If you want to know what the brightest people of the middle ages and renaissance were up to this book is for you. 12/25/2017 It is really strange how spooky and occult memory seemed to renaissance magisters. Then again the mind is a spooky and occult thing.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    *Note: After re-reading this review, I am thoroughly unsatisfied with it. Try as I may, I cannot convey just how amazing this book is. Before reading it, I had no idea the depth and breadth of what I didn't know. It has changed the way I read classical and medieval history. This book opened up to me an understanding of an entire discipline dedicated to memory, which I had never discovered previously. I had to re-read the first three chapters after going over them once because it took awhile to ad *Note: After re-reading this review, I am thoroughly unsatisfied with it. Try as I may, I cannot convey just how amazing this book is. Before reading it, I had no idea the depth and breadth of what I didn't know. It has changed the way I read classical and medieval history. This book opened up to me an understanding of an entire discipline dedicated to memory, which I had never discovered previously. I had to re-read the first three chapters after going over them once because it took awhile to adjust my brain to Yates's pre-printing press world. Yates traces the history the art of memory as it trickles out of the ruins of the Roman Empire to the medieval monasteries of Europe and, finally for Yates, to the Renaissance. Watching the art of memory develop from a technique that appears to be cumbersome and useless to one that is sleek, efficient, and decidedly modern is fascinating. This book can be a slog. There is lots of Latin and Italian, and you're going to have to have your online dictionary or translation book handy for most chapters. It's very dense, and at times I just had to put it down because my brain had reached its limit, but the subject matter really kept me going because I found it so darn fascinating. Highly recommended. I am currently reading Gleick's The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood, and there are tons of synergies with how the pre-modern thinker used his memory in an age where words and ideas existed primarily in the ether rather than on paper. The Art of Memory changed the way I'll read books in the future. For that, it's worth your time.

  7. 4 out of 5

    A. J. McMahon

    This is one of my favourite books of all time, which I have read three times by now. It tells the story of the now forgotten art of memory which was practised in ancient times from its beginnings in Ancient Greece up until round about the Enlightenment, when it fell into disuse amongst the educated elite, along with so much else of the wit and wisdom of times past. It is a great pity that we are not all taught this art of memory at school. This art of memory still forms the foundation of modern This is one of my favourite books of all time, which I have read three times by now. It tells the story of the now forgotten art of memory which was practised in ancient times from its beginnings in Ancient Greece up until round about the Enlightenment, when it fell into disuse amongst the educated elite, along with so much else of the wit and wisdom of times past. It is a great pity that we are not all taught this art of memory at school. This art of memory still forms the foundation of modern day mnemonics, such as that on show at modern memory competitions. The basic principle of it is that places and locations and images are used to associate what needs to be remembered in such a way that by mentally recalling these images the knowledge itself is recalled. The technique works brilliantly well, as I have found myself by putting it to practise. Why exactly it works no-one has ever found out, but then the nature of memory itself remains a mystery to this day. Frances Yates writes so beautifully, and the material which she deals in is so very interesting, that this book constitutes a beautiful read from cover to cover. Very highly recommended!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Martin Sebesta

    Nehodnotím. Tahle kniha je skvělým příkladem toho, co mi vadí na "akademismu". Yatesová v podstatě napíše knihu o paměťových technikách, aniž by kdy zkoušela používat paměťové techniky. To vede k tomu, že jejich velkou část buď nepochopila, anebo ji neumí popsat. Její popisy jsou bez podstaty - čtete, čtete, a zjistíte že nevíte o čem, zjistíte že slova nemáte spojena s nějakým významem. Například Llullovy a Brunovy paměťové kruhy nechápu, protože jsou popsané jen tak, že se v mysli otáčí, ale Y Nehodnotím. Tahle kniha je skvělým příkladem toho, co mi vadí na "akademismu". Yatesová v podstatě napíše knihu o paměťových technikách, aniž by kdy zkoušela používat paměťové techniky. To vede k tomu, že jejich velkou část buď nepochopila, anebo ji neumí popsat. Její popisy jsou bez podstaty - čtete, čtete, a zjistíte že nevíte o čem, zjistíte že slova nemáte spojena s nějakým významem. Například Llullovy a Brunovy paměťové kruhy nechápu, protože jsou popsané jen tak, že se v mysli otáčí, ale Yatesová už nenapíše, v čem je praktická výhoda pro uživatele této techniky. Proč? Protože to evidentně neví, když tyto techniky nikdy nezkoušela. Argument, že to není technická příručka, ale historie určitého vymřelého umění, neberu, protože když nevím, jak se tyto techniky používají, vytvářím mrtvou, popisnou vědu. Mimochodem sama Yatesová Bruna obdivuje že proti této formě vědy bojoval. Ano, kniha je protkaná občasnými obdivnými výkřiky obdivu k Giordanu Brunovi. Yatesová nejvíce proslula svou tezí, že na rozvoji vědy měla velký podíl hermetická, a tedy okultní tradice. Mám pocit, že to vysvětluje spoustu pro mě podivných věcí na této knize. Zdá se mi totiž, že i zde zdůrazňuje přítomnost okultismu v obecném myšlení zvláště během renesance - na úkor samotného tématu, umění paměti. Na knize je nejvíc přínosné to, že vám ukáže koho si máte přečíst. První kapitola je taky skvělá, protože výborně popisuje klasické, a dodnes živé, zdroje umění paměti. Závěr: Kniha popisuje umění paměti jako fenomén, a ne jako umění samotné. Nehodnotím, ale kdybych hodnotil, tak dám velmi málo - zdejší hodnocení mi příjde až směšně vysoké.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    Really cool subject matter, I would never have thought about this subject matter as a subject matter, and even cooler is at the center of the subject matter is a mystery, and so you aren't even sure what you are reading about exactly. The beginning of a study, so much untapped into, although also, rather anglo-centric. Maybe some new academic will expand (or maybe has?)this study to include african or asian systems of memory...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tony Gualtieri

    There are enough reviews here describing the contents and quality of this book. For me, the best part was the palpable sense of discovery the author conveyed as she began to see how Simonides's artificial memory permeated Renaissance culture and became a hidden strand connecting Thomas Aquinas's Method to Raymond Llull's Art to Giordano Bruno's enigmatic Shadows and Seals and on to Shakespeare's Globe Theatre and Gottfried Wilhelm von Leibniz's invention of infinitesimal calculus.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    I discovered this book when I was at university years ago and it captured my imagination completely. I loved the descriptions of the Memory Theatres in particular and I found it really well written.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gavriil Gabriel

    Understanding memory has been one of man's greatest interest and achieving the little knowledge we know of our own mind is a great accomplishment as is. Frances A. Yates explains the history of the 'art of memory' as she calls it, starting from the master of memory himself - Simonides and the unknown author of Ad Herenium. Giving detailed descriptions of how to go abaout honing one's memory/ I went into this book as a speculator - something in the title and cover drew me in - and came out with in Understanding memory has been one of man's greatest interest and achieving the little knowledge we know of our own mind is a great accomplishment as is. Frances A. Yates explains the history of the 'art of memory' as she calls it, starting from the master of memory himself - Simonides and the unknown author of Ad Herenium. Giving detailed descriptions of how to go abaout honing one's memory/ I went into this book as a speculator - something in the title and cover drew me in - and came out with in depth knowledge of how to sharpen my memory and most importantly how to integrate it into my daily life. I'm positive in the next few years i will possess close to eidetic memory. This is hands down in the top three of my favourite books (sorry Tolstoy).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Peter Thomason

    Frances Yates is an extraordinary scholar with a dry and reserved sense of humor. This was a long slog for me but I was determined to get through it no matter how long it took. In terms of the depth of the material covered, it was like taking a 15 week doctoral course, so I treated it that way. No rushing through it; I would read a section, then re-read and underline, then re-read and summarize a paragraph or a page in the margin in my effort to retain as much as possible. In addition to her car Frances Yates is an extraordinary scholar with a dry and reserved sense of humor. This was a long slog for me but I was determined to get through it no matter how long it took. In terms of the depth of the material covered, it was like taking a 15 week doctoral course, so I treated it that way. No rushing through it; I would read a section, then re-read and underline, then re-read and summarize a paragraph or a page in the margin in my effort to retain as much as possible. In addition to her careful chronological assignment of different approaches to the art of memory to the historical period in which they developed, she gives detailed descriptions of the transformations the art went through. From its invention in classical antiquity to Cicero's refinements of it for rhetoric and oratory, to its use by Albert the Great, T. Aquinas, and Raymond Lull for religious purposes in the late Middle Ages, to occult and highly magicized versions created by Camillo and Fludd in their Renaissance memory theaters to Giordano Bruno's Hermetic memory-based religion for which he was burned at the stake in 1600, all are investigated by Yates in great detail. While this is a book in the somewhat esoteric field of the history of ideas and not a self-help book by any measure, it does, nevertheless, help the reader to identify which "systems" have stood the test of time and are practically useful for improving one's memory through the art. It is also provides a fascinating look into how the development of scientific method grew out of attempts by Renaissance thinkers to find the great key to all knowledge by blending aspects of the traditional practice of the art with magic, cabalism, astrology, neo-platonism, pseudo-science, and religion. If you have the time, this book, described as one of the greatest 100 non-fiction books of the 20th century, will provide some great background for understanding what happened in the history of ideas in 17th century Europe and the development of the modern era. As Yates says at the end of the book, "The art of memory is a clear case of a marginal subject, not recognised as belonging to any of the normal disciplines, having been omitted becasue it was no one's business. And yet it has turned out to be, in a sense, everyone's business. The history of the organization of memory touches at vital points on the history of religion and ethics, of philosophy and psychology, of art and literature, of scientific method...When we reflect on these profound affiliations of our theme it begins to seem after all not so surprising that the pursuit of it should have opened up new views of some of the greatest manifestations of our culture." Be prepared to eat slowly because there is a lot to digest. She will also expect you to know your Latin, some Italian, some French, and classical authors and history since this is aimed at a scholarly rather than a popular audience. As someone who is not a "scholar" but enjoys learning, even when it stretches me, there were parts that were daunting and felt out of my comfort zone. My French is rusty, my Latin minimal, my Italian virtually non-existent, and my knowledge of classical western antiquity and mythology just so so. Nevertheless, with the help of Google and the Internet, it's possible to make sense of most of what she has to say and her citations. In an age when discussions of memory have to do with how much you have on your device, this book is a good reminder that for most of our history, most of us, not just the educated class, learned to internalize knowledge, not by relying on the capacity of our "natural" memory but through the learned "art of memory."

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Aitken

    Dame France Yates' treatise starts off innocently enough: “Orderly arrangement is essential for good memory” (Yates 17). So the ancients thought. The ars memoria by itself is neutral. Yates advances the thesis that Renaissance thinkers used it as a vehicle for the Hermetic tradition. While the medieval tradition did little to develop the art of memory, it did set the stage for Renaissance Neoplatonism, which transformed the art of memory into a hermetic and occultic doctrine (134). The memory sys Dame France Yates' treatise starts off innocently enough: “Orderly arrangement is essential for good memory” (Yates 17). So the ancients thought. The ars memoria by itself is neutral. Yates advances the thesis that Renaissance thinkers used it as a vehicle for the Hermetic tradition. While the medieval tradition did little to develop the art of memory, it did set the stage for Renaissance Neoplatonism, which transformed the art of memory into a hermetic and occultic doctrine (134). The memory system is a system of memory places and those images “are those of the planetary gods” (148). Renaissance thinkers were quick to say that “memory is organically geared to the universe” (149). As the old hermetic dictum said, “As above, so below.” Renaissance man saw man as quasi-divine and “having the powers of the star rulers” (151). Indeed, he is part “demon,” in fact a “star-demon” (Camillo, Asclepius). In short, thinkers like Camillo and Ficino turned classical memory “into an occult art” (155). How does Renaissance man “tap into this power?” We have already noted a connection between man and the stars, but what is the “middle man,” so to speak? Yates suggests a “talisman” of sorts. A talisman is any imprinted with perceived powers. Yates suggests that the talismans in this case were planetary images, perhaps the new instantiation of the imagines agentes (159). The goal of the Hermetic art of memory was the formation of the Magus (161). Raymond Lull is pivotal because he represents a medium in which Renaissance Neo-Platonists chose a medieval figure for their occultic research. Lull based his structure off of Augustinie’s trinitarian analogies. Lull also introduces the movement of ascending and descending in the Memory Art (181). Lull is a Christian form of Cabbalism, in which letters stand for divine names which (per some doctrines of simplicity), were the same thing as God (189). Giordano Bruno and the Shadows At this point in the narrative the earlier Art of Memory has become a definitive occultic art (200). For some reason Bruno was obsessed with the number 30. In many ways Bruno fine-tunes earlier mnemonic images along a more Neo-Platonic and ontological framework. The stars are now intermediaries (or rather, the spirits behind the stars). The magus will manipulate these images to unlock higher realities. As Yates notes, “the star-images are the ‘shadows of ideas,’ shadows of reality which are nearer in reality than the physical shadows of the lower world” (Yates 213). Several Hermetic Assumptions in Bruno: (1) Man’s mind is in some sense divine and connected to the “star governors” of the world (221). (2) A golden chain connects higher and lower things. Sub-conclusion: the classical art of memory has been transformed to a “vehicle for the formation of the psyche of a Hermetic mystic and magus” (225). He moves back to a “darker magic,” seeking not a Trinity but a One. Conclusion: Yates' work is both exciting and scholarly. She does assume some familiarity, if not with her earlier works, then at least with Renaissance occultism (in the academic sense). Some of the sections towards the end of the work do not always tie in neatly with her thesis, but they are informative nonetheless.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Orion

    Pretty awesome book. It's not a how-to book, but a history of people who were quite memorious and how the techniques of memory changed over time. Before the printed word, people were valued for how much they could remember. So since the Greeks, they devised ever more clever ways to remember important things. I've always been fascinated by "Renaisance Men", polymaths, and encyclopedists, but I never understood how someone could hold such vast amounts of information in their heads. Now I know. If Pretty awesome book. It's not a how-to book, but a history of people who were quite memorious and how the techniques of memory changed over time. Before the printed word, people were valued for how much they could remember. So since the Greeks, they devised ever more clever ways to remember important things. I've always been fascinated by "Renaisance Men", polymaths, and encyclopedists, but I never understood how someone could hold such vast amounts of information in their heads. Now I know. If you want to know the basics of these concepts you can get a quick reference on wikipedia or other places on the web by searching for the "art of memory" or "memory techniques". Once you know the basics you can practice them yourself, right away. This book is not that. The basics are in chapter one. The maestros of memory are the heroes of the rest of the book. Climaxing in the renaissance when forgotten monks could remember everything they read. I recommend it highly. Not many books illuminate a completely different perspective on history. Even a different view on the influence of memory on history and art.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Avery

    This is a good introduction to the subject and how widespread the art of memory was up until Leibniz. I felt it lacked a certain context linking the pre-Enlightenment world to our world. For that missing context, try Paolo Rossi's Logic and the Art of Memory: The Quest for a Universal Language. Feels kind of dumb to award it 4 stars, since the writing is far superior to most 21st century academic publications, but star ratings are always going to be a little arbitrary.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Larry

    What a fascinating work. Groundbreaking history told with a lively voice. Yates pioneered work on the history of mnemonic techniques which were far more influential than was commonly supposed. Essentially a whole area of intellectual history had been ignored for the last three hundred years because its occult connections made it "disreputable" (it's interesting the blinders academics can wear, and always worth remembering). This book has influenced several important writers of fiction in the deca What a fascinating work. Groundbreaking history told with a lively voice. Yates pioneered work on the history of mnemonic techniques which were far more influential than was commonly supposed. Essentially a whole area of intellectual history had been ignored for the last three hundred years because its occult connections made it "disreputable" (it's interesting the blinders academics can wear, and always worth remembering). This book has influenced several important writers of fiction in the decades since it was written. John Crowley, obviously, but also Gene Wolfe and Hilary Mantel, off the top of my head.

  18. 4 out of 5

    DoctorM

    I found this book a while ago--- through the bibliography in Jonathan Spence's "The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci", a book I loved (and used to assign to intro World History classes). Dame Frances Yates is a fine writer about the more esoteric side of late-Renaissance and Early Modern Europe (see her "The Rosicrucian Enlightenment"), and "The Art of Memory" is an intriguing account of both the mnemonic arts in 16th-c. Europe and of the way the era imagined ways to describe the world. A fascinati I found this book a while ago--- through the bibliography in Jonathan Spence's "The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci", a book I loved (and used to assign to intro World History classes). Dame Frances Yates is a fine writer about the more esoteric side of late-Renaissance and Early Modern Europe (see her "The Rosicrucian Enlightenment"), and "The Art of Memory" is an intriguing account of both the mnemonic arts in 16th-c. Europe and of the way the era imagined ways to describe the world. A fascinating book, and an excellent look into the mind of another era.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    This amazing history of the Art of Memory, dating back into the Roman writings of an unknown writer most often associated with Cicero, was absolutely fascinating, and started me down the long and winding road of my love of Giordano Bruno (that John Crowley helped me with). This book has also led me to the wonderful works of Mary Carruthers on medieval memory.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dino

    This is an incredible book and ,in my opinion, deserves 5 stars; however, it is not "perfect" for the following reasons: 1. The thinkers that Yates talks about are somewhat, at least to me, obscure and I doubt that many people know or have read (I have not either) : Gulio Camillo, Ramon Llull or Robert Fludd. Giordano Bruno and Pico della Mirandola are perhaps more well known but still, I haven't met any person who really has read anything by these people. Perhaps, I should hang around more renai This is an incredible book and ,in my opinion, deserves 5 stars; however, it is not "perfect" for the following reasons: 1. The thinkers that Yates talks about are somewhat, at least to me, obscure and I doubt that many people know or have read (I have not either) : Gulio Camillo, Ramon Llull or Robert Fludd. Giordano Bruno and Pico della Mirandola are perhaps more well known but still, I haven't met any person who really has read anything by these people. Perhaps, I should hang around more renaissance museums. 2. A big chunk, almost a third of the book, I fear, is about Giordano Bruno and Yates comes always back to Bruno's thoughts and the importance of Bruno. Naturally, since she wrote her PhD dissertation about Bruno and studied him for most of her life, it makes sense that she would want to talk about Bruno, but this makes the title of the book itself a little bit misleading since it's not really about all historic eras (the book finishes with the 17th century) and focuses mostly on few very specific thinkers in great detail. Maybe, a more precise title for the book would be something along the lines of "Art and magic/occult influences on Giordano Bruno and memory" 3. The writing is kinda dry and the book reads more like a textbook for college, kinda. (4. Yates is heavy on the "magic", if you are looking for a say purely scientific and empirical things about Memory I don't think that this is the best book for you, frankly, I loved it for that reason but think that this might be off-putting problem for some people. I liked it since I believe that human imagination is a powerful thing) Anyway, despite the "problems" I mentioned above, I cannot give it any less than five stars. It is a difficult and again, dry book, but a book that inspires creativity, thought and clearness. (also, I like that it is, in a sense, also a book about magic)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ganesh Ubuntu

    It started off as a rather challenging read for me. English is not my first language and academic English is far from being second or even third. The first few chapters ended up being hard work where I had to check quite a few words in a dictionary and reread many paragraphs more than once, forcing my attention to do more than just sliding through the text. I did get a hang of it towards the middle of the book and by the end of it the reading process turned to be quite enjoyable. I guess it says It started off as a rather challenging read for me. English is not my first language and academic English is far from being second or even third. The first few chapters ended up being hard work where I had to check quite a few words in a dictionary and reread many paragraphs more than once, forcing my attention to do more than just sliding through the text. I did get a hang of it towards the middle of the book and by the end of it the reading process turned to be quite enjoyable. I guess it says more about myself than the book but I just wanted to give a perspective of someone who is not used to this style of writing. The book itself covers the evolution of nearly forgotten art of memory in Europe. It starts from the ancient Greece and the earliest works on the art that are known to us and finishes in the 17th century when the elements of the art, while still recognisable in human thought, have ceased to be a discipline of its own. "The Art of Memory" is a history book. As such, it doesn't go into too many details on how to practice the art itself other than the most recognisable elements. Still, it gives enough information to come up with a simple memory system by oneself. In fact, even the first few clumsy attempts to experiment with memorising relatively short shopping lists and other rather inconsequential pieces of data raised my eyebrows at how reliable my memory can be!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tait Jensen

    This is an intriguing, vastly erudite, and fastidious history of the art of memory. Yates takes us through the muck at certain points with her innumerable references to arcane Italian, French, and Latin sources, but we emerge at the end with a fascinating notion: that the development of memory was, in and of itself, a method for gathering and storing universal knowledge, thus forming a precursor to the Enlightenment era and, eventually, the invention of computing. Yates is at times discursive, g This is an intriguing, vastly erudite, and fastidious history of the art of memory. Yates takes us through the muck at certain points with her innumerable references to arcane Italian, French, and Latin sources, but we emerge at the end with a fascinating notion: that the development of memory was, in and of itself, a method for gathering and storing universal knowledge, thus forming a precursor to the Enlightenment era and, eventually, the invention of computing. Yates is at times discursive, going so far as to devote an entire chapter to her (still) inchoate theory of the Globe Theatre as the physical representation of an occult memory method developed in the 16th century. While intriguing, it is difficult to follow speculation of this sort without a firmer grasp on source material. Even still, Yates is a fine scholar worthy of commendation for attacking an untouched subject and producing a work that is both interesting and largely comprehensible.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    One star is slightly misleading, but I couldn't justify the two. The topic of this book is endlessly intriguing, but in the hands of this author it became a Sisyphean battle. Finnegans Wake was a country stroll in comparison. Every single paragraph of the text oozes with this woman's blatant over-education. Not her fault, but neither is it mine to feel completely emotionless towards what she's trying to achieve. If you're looking for a direction in which to go about pursuing the techniques discus One star is slightly misleading, but I couldn't justify the two. The topic of this book is endlessly intriguing, but in the hands of this author it became a Sisyphean battle. Finnegans Wake was a country stroll in comparison. Every single paragraph of the text oozes with this woman's blatant over-education. Not her fault, but neither is it mine to feel completely emotionless towards what she's trying to achieve. If you're looking for a direction in which to go about pursuing the techniques discussed, find a manual instead. This author will only confuse you, and potentially make you hateful towards the subject matter. Could have used an editor as well. Could smell the glee pluming off the pages where ten words could have been made five. Took me over a month to finish. It's been about three years since that happened. Look elsewhere.

  24. 5 out of 5

    hoffnarr

    Fascinating history of the art of memory. Links up a number of thinkers in refreshing and apparently when this came out, new ways. Some chapters on Lullism and Bruno and the hermetic tradition were a very heavy slog despite being the climax of the author’s most original arguments and I confess to some skimming there. The early chapters through the chapter on Thomas Aquinas were a wonderful survey of mnemotechnics from Greek to medieval European (of course the discussion is limited to the Europea Fascinating history of the art of memory. Links up a number of thinkers in refreshing and apparently when this came out, new ways. Some chapters on Lullism and Bruno and the hermetic tradition were a very heavy slog despite being the climax of the author’s most original arguments and I confess to some skimming there. The early chapters through the chapter on Thomas Aquinas were a wonderful survey of mnemotechnics from Greek to medieval European (of course the discussion is limited to the European side of things) history of memory techniques.

  25. 4 out of 5

    fm4d

    Warning: Absolutely don't consider this book if you are interested in the Art of Memory (the actual art, not the book) but didn't read other, modern books or learned at least basic memory techniques or you will be let down. The book is a historical inquiry of how those techniques evolved and how they affected population, art, etc., but it is a very blurry since there is not much material and the book that were actually preserved are quite hard to understand and lack examples, therefore absolutel Warning: Absolutely don't consider this book if you are interested in the Art of Memory (the actual art, not the book) but didn't read other, modern books or learned at least basic memory techniques or you will be let down. The book is a historical inquiry of how those techniques evolved and how they affected population, art, etc., but it is a very blurry since there is not much material and the book that were actually preserved are quite hard to understand and lack examples, therefore absolutely impenetrable for a beginner. What also does not help is the very dry style in which the book is written in - author focuses heavily on names, dates, historical facts which makes some parts quite hard to read. Warning2: Main focus is on the 14-16 century where Art of Memory got mixed with magic and occult stuff and the result is quite uninteresting from the viewpoint of the modern practitioner. Nevertheless it is still quite interesting reading and provides many valuable historical insights, but because the insights are purely historical and very remote from modern Art of Memory I can recommend it only to those who already know the practical side of this matter. BTW: The author confesses that she has no practical skills or knowledge of memory techniques and I feel like it really made the book much less useful for me.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Abraão Golfet De Souza

    Quite technical and not at all what I was hoping it would be. Arasse brought me here and did not tell me everything I was up to find. Interesting, though.

  27. 4 out of 5

    William Schram

    This is not quite what I expected, but it was still pretty interesting. The book starts out with the story of Simonides, and his theories of memory. The use of images and loci is put forth in some books that are referenced by the author. Ad Herennium is the biggest one that is mentioned early on, and was a textbook. It then follows the art of memory as it goes through the ages, eventually becoming some kind of mystic, magical technique. Basically they go and take the idea of the loci and make it This is not quite what I expected, but it was still pretty interesting. The book starts out with the story of Simonides, and his theories of memory. The use of images and loci is put forth in some books that are referenced by the author. Ad Herennium is the biggest one that is mentioned early on, and was a textbook. It then follows the art of memory as it goes through the ages, eventually becoming some kind of mystic, magical technique. Basically they go and take the idea of the loci and make it so it uses the Signs of the Zodiac. It also combines the system of the Kaballah and the Sephirot into the art and makes it even weirder. Yates argues that this was meant to connect with reality on a deeper level and give them mystic powers or something, and I can only suppose that this is correct. This mostly happens in the Renaissance Era. Through the Middle Ages, the art of memory is supported by such superstars as St. Thomas Aquinas and the Dominican Order. So, the art is used in the Middle Ages to remember the places of Hell and the Virtues to follow to avoid it. By the time of the Renaissance, there are a few people that are accused of Witchcraft through this, with the most grievous case being that of Giordano Bruno. The man was burned at the stake; a really tragic end to an interesting person. The book seems to go on a few tangents, but the author is pretty good at reining in the story. The biggest jump is in the last chapters where she discusses memory theaters and the Globe theater of Shakespeare. She admits to her going off on a tangent, but includes it since it is important to what she is trying to prove in the book. Something about connecting the ideas of God in Man contained in a building or something. For the final chapter, Yates talks a bit about Memory techniques in the Seventeenth Century with Sir Francis Bacon and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. These two seem to lend scientific support to the theory of memory. In any case, the book was interesting, but I don't think I will be reading it again.

  28. 4 out of 5

    sillopillo

    Ricordare per immagini passeggiando nei luoghi ... L'argomento trattato dal libro e' abbastanza particolare in quanto riferisce dei metodi utilizzati nel passato per poter memorizzare grandi quantita' di informazioni in modo da permettere ai grandi oratori di stupire gli ascoltatori con discorsi che potevano durare ore e che erano in grado di citare nomi, nozioni e avvenimenti senza apparente fatica. Il metodo utilizzato permetteva di percorrere le informazioni esposte in "avanti e indietro" senz Ricordare per immagini passeggiando nei luoghi ... L'argomento trattato dal libro e' abbastanza particolare in quanto riferisce dei metodi utilizzati nel passato per poter memorizzare grandi quantita' di informazioni in modo da permettere ai grandi oratori di stupire gli ascoltatori con discorsi che potevano durare ore e che erano in grado di citare nomi, nozioni e avvenimenti senza apparente fatica. Il metodo utilizzato permetteva di percorrere le informazioni esposte in "avanti e indietro" senza problemi come se si percorresse un edificio passando da un ambiente all'altro e "ricordando" per ciascun ambiente le informazioni fissate. Percorrendo la storia il libro cita poi come questi metodi di memorizzazione, che a partire da concetti di associazione di immagini e luoghi per fissare le informazioni nella memoria, assumano via via una componente sempre piu' "magica" e "occulta" fino a diventate con Giordano Bruno un autentico "scrigno" che deve essere aperto solo a fronte di studio e applicazione accettando anche una dimensione soprannaturale dei meccanismi utilizzati. Apprezzabili sono i passaggi attraverso le vicende di Giulio Camillo con il suo "Teatro della memoria", di Pietro Ramo, di Raimondo Lullo e di Robert Fludd che difficilmente sono percorribili e cosi' correlate in altre pubblicazioni.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I'm not sure why I ended up trying to read this... I think possibly a comment about it in The New Media Reader piqued my interest. It's a scholarly investigation of the "art of memory," a technique dating from ancient times in which one memorizes a speech or a series of facts by "placing" the information on various locations in the memory. For example, you would walk through a building and stop at a pillar here, a shield resting there, and fix the locations in your memory. Then, you associate w I'm not sure why I ended up trying to read this... I think possibly a comment about it in The New Media Reader piqued my interest. It's a scholarly investigation of the "art of memory," a technique dating from ancient times in which one memorizes a speech or a series of facts by "placing" the information on various locations in the memory. For example, you would walk through a building and stop at a pillar here, a shield resting there, and fix the locations in your memory. Then, you associate what you are trying to memorize with the locations you have fixed in your mind. I enjoyed reading about the origins of this technique - how masters were said to be able to recite the poems of Homer backwards, or memorize hundreds of names upon a single hearing. I also gained a fresh perspective on the importance of memory throughout the ages, from rhetoric to terabytes. Imagine how important human memory would be if external memory was nonexistent! After a few chapters, though, this is a much more in-depth look at the subject than I really cared to read. So I stopped.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lysergius

    Frances A. Yates, in this study of how people learned to retain vast stores of knowledge before the invention of the printed page, traces the art of memory from its treatment by Greek orators, through its Gothic transformations in the Middle Ages, to the occult forms it took in the Renaissance, and finally to its use in the seventeenth century. The ancient Greeks, to whom a trained memory was of vital importance, created an elaborate memory system, based on a technique of impressing "locations" Frances A. Yates, in this study of how people learned to retain vast stores of knowledge before the invention of the printed page, traces the art of memory from its treatment by Greek orators, through its Gothic transformations in the Middle Ages, to the occult forms it took in the Renaissance, and finally to its use in the seventeenth century. The ancient Greeks, to whom a trained memory was of vital importance, created an elaborate memory system, based on a technique of impressing "locations" and "images" on the mind. Inherited and used by the Romans, this ars memoria passed into the European tradition, to be revived, in occult form, during the Renaissance, by the remarkable genius, Giordano Bruno. This is the main theme of Frances Yates's unique book, in which she sheds light on such diverse subjects as Dante's "Divine Comedy, " the form of the Shakespearian theatre and the history of ancient architecture.

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