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O Mundo Perdido

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Seis anos se passaram desde os terríveis acontecimentos no Jurassic Park. Seis anos, desde que o sonho extraordinário, nos limites entre a ciência e a imaginação humana, acabou se tornando um trágico pesadelo. A Isla Nublar não era o único lugar usado por John Hammond em suas pesquisas genéticas de ponta. Agora, o matemático Ian Malcolm e uma equipe de cientistas – além de Seis anos se passaram desde os terríveis acontecimentos no Jurassic Park. Seis anos, desde que o sonho extraordinário, nos limites entre a ciência e a imaginação humana, acabou se tornando um trágico pesadelo. A Isla Nublar não era o único lugar usado por John Hammond em suas pesquisas genéticas de ponta. Agora, o matemático Ian Malcolm e uma equipe de cientistas – além de certos “pequenos clandestinos” – devem explorar outra ilha na Costa Rica, repleta dos mais perigosos dinossauros que já caminharam pela Terra.


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Seis anos se passaram desde os terríveis acontecimentos no Jurassic Park. Seis anos, desde que o sonho extraordinário, nos limites entre a ciência e a imaginação humana, acabou se tornando um trágico pesadelo. A Isla Nublar não era o único lugar usado por John Hammond em suas pesquisas genéticas de ponta. Agora, o matemático Ian Malcolm e uma equipe de cientistas – além de Seis anos se passaram desde os terríveis acontecimentos no Jurassic Park. Seis anos, desde que o sonho extraordinário, nos limites entre a ciência e a imaginação humana, acabou se tornando um trágico pesadelo. A Isla Nublar não era o único lugar usado por John Hammond em suas pesquisas genéticas de ponta. Agora, o matemático Ian Malcolm e uma equipe de cientistas – além de certos “pequenos clandestinos” – devem explorar outra ilha na Costa Rica, repleta dos mais perigosos dinossauros que já caminharam pela Terra.

30 review for O Mundo Perdido

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

    I find a lot of people discuss the "resurrection" of Ian Malcolm in their reviews, and I'd like to throw in my two cents. It's true, Malcolm is mentioned as dead at the end of Jurassic Park. To be exact, Muldoon is telling Grant what's happened to everyone else as they're flying away in the helicopter: "What about Malcolm?" Grant said. Muldoon shook his head. The epilogue mentions the Costa Rican government not permitting the burial of John Hammond or Ian Malcolm (amongst a list of other ways they I find a lot of people discuss the "resurrection" of Ian Malcolm in their reviews, and I'd like to throw in my two cents. It's true, Malcolm is mentioned as dead at the end of Jurassic Park. To be exact, Muldoon is telling Grant what's happened to everyone else as they're flying away in the helicopter: "What about Malcolm?" Grant said. Muldoon shook his head. The epilogue mentions the Costa Rican government not permitting the burial of John Hammond or Ian Malcolm (amongst a list of other ways they dragged their feet and covered things up). But that's it. My point is this: it's not as if Crichton tricked us by delivering a long death scene where Ian Malcolm said his last goodbyes and made some final point about evolution and chaos theory - then got lazy and just reintroduced Malcolm into the next book. Malcolm's "death" in JP was not seen, and only vaguely mentioned (unlike every other major character who died in the book). Also, the explanation given in The Lost World as to why the others thought he was dead was completely plausible - he was simply so close to death that he was left for dead. I'll get off of my soapbox now. For me, The Lost World was a satisfying and exciting read. I think I read it in about a day and a half the first time, and I've re-read it a few times since.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Beorn

    The story goes that Steven Spielberg flush with the success of the first Jurassic Park movie, itself an adaptation of a Michael Chrichton novel, decided to try and repeat his success by commissioning the author to write a sequel to his original novel (which the first movie was based on) which they could then adapt into a movie. Whether or not that's true I cannot say but I will say that do not base your initial judgement of this book or the prospect of reading it on the lacklustre utter turkey th The story goes that Steven Spielberg flush with the success of the first Jurassic Park movie, itself an adaptation of a Michael Chrichton novel, decided to try and repeat his success by commissioning the author to write a sequel to his original novel (which the first movie was based on) which they could then adapt into a movie. Whether or not that's true I cannot say but I will say that do not base your initial judgement of this book or the prospect of reading it on the lacklustre utter turkey that the film turned out to be. In many respects, the novel is everything the film should have been and wasn't. Not only did Spielberg fiddle with a lot of the key elements of the story but completely remove some of the best parts of the whole story! I won't go into details as it'll only include spoilers but I've lost track of how many times I've read this book other than it being somewhere in the region of twenty or more times. It's THAT good! If you're a fan of Michael Chricton, dinosaurs or just rip-roaring adrenaline-fuelled rides, you should give this book the read it clearly deserves! Forget the movie altogether, witness what should have been!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chris Friend

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. WOW, this was disappointing. I remembered going into this book that I had enjoyed the film version of the original Jurrasic Park far more than the book -- a rather unusual situation for me. I had a slight feeling of apprehension, but I ignored it. Even if I hadn't, though, it wouldn't have prepared me for the frustration and disappointment of this story. Let me get this point out right from the start: The plot resolves itself WAY too quickly, as though something that is suddenly obvious, easy to t WOW, this was disappointing. I remembered going into this book that I had enjoyed the film version of the original Jurrasic Park far more than the book -- a rather unusual situation for me. I had a slight feeling of apprehension, but I ignored it. Even if I hadn't, though, it wouldn't have prepared me for the frustration and disappointment of this story. Let me get this point out right from the start: The plot resolves itself WAY too quickly, as though something that is suddenly obvious, easy to think of, and even easier to find was completely hidden from consciousness since the characters' first opportunity to think of it from about a fifth of the way into the book. Additionally, the characters pose some very interesting questions during their experiences that would be fodder for quite interesting discussions or even intriguing scientific theory/discovery in the book. (For instance, why are there so many predators on the island? Why do they see so few carcasses? What went wrong on the island? Why does the raptor nest look the way it does?) That last was the only one I thought was halfway decently answered; all the rest seemed like cop-outs. Hell, the way the characters started to get out of their last little fix was complete B.S. that came from a bogus thought process from one of the kids. One random compliment that (unfortunately) has nothing to do with the author's writing ability: He took the Carnotaurus that I'm familiar with from the simulator ride Dinosaur! at Disney's Animal Kingdom and gave it a rather unique twist: the ability to change colors with astonishing detail. I'll have to admit, after being scared by that dino on the ride many years ago, the thought of it being a chameleon made me sympathize with the terror felt by the characters. But really only for one scene. Then it was right back to the frustration. My biggest complaint was the author's blatant activation of dramatic suspense. A character's thoughts would be either articulated through dialogue or explained through narration right up to the next-to-the-last word, and then something would distract the person from completing the thought, and the author would move on. That, in my book, is cheating. If the character thinks about something but can't figure it out, of if he's unsure why something just came to mind, fine. That's character development, in a way. (Levine's thoughts on daylight in the final scene fall into this category. I actually accepted that he couldn't remember what the big deal was. Granted, when he finally *did* figure it out, and he went back into his holier-than-thou attitude, even saying, "Well, isn't it obvious?", I wasn't sure if I wanted to smack Crichton or Levine more.) A couple of conversations between characters -- usually involving Levine, now that I think of it -- were so full of these interruptions that I almost threw down the book. I was being played with, and I didn't appreciate it. It was something like this: "So I got this completely figured out. The only way we can avoid getting eaten in the next twenty seconds is if we.... Oh, look! A leaf just fell in the breeze!" or "I wonder why these dinos are acting like this. It might have something to do with the environment they're in. Okay, if we factor in what they had for breakfast last year, and consider the death rate among dinos living 65 million years ago... Oh, this makes sense. They're all dying because....ACK! An attacking dino!" and then "Levine reaches the place he's been trying to reach for the last sixty pages. There's a dino in his way. He looks around for a tool to use to beat the beast to smithereens, getting more and more anxiously panicked, trying desperately to think of anything, when suddenly he sees....And the dino roared and started charging." Whether the reader is supposed to feel exhilaration from the suspense, offense from being insulted, or just frustration with the irrational and incomplete descriptions, I won't pretend to know. Personally, though, a combination of the latter two was able to fester and boil and brood quite effectively throughout the course of the novel. I was completely put off by the writing style and the predictability of his archetypes -- I could easily make a matching quiz to list the names of characters from this book and its predecessor, and there's a direct correlation for each one, with the same role being filled by each and the same outcome happening to each. Oh, and Malcomb gets hurt. Again. What the heck is this guy's role, really? Token chaos-theory expert to make the reader believe that when everything goes to hell, it's supposed to? Bubcus. I hereby swear to never again read another Michael Crichton novel. Yep, it was that disappointing.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Casey

    I will start my review by saying that I did not enjoy this novel nearly as much as the first book, Jurassic Park. While this was an incredibly easy and fast read, I would have preferred if Crichton had cut roughly a hundred pages of additional information that, in my opinion, did not add to the story. Other than that, wow! What an adrenaline-charging, action-packed book! Crichton sure knew how to grab his audience by the hand and take them on a roller-coaster into a whole other world—a world in I will start my review by saying that I did not enjoy this novel nearly as much as the first book, Jurassic Park. While this was an incredibly easy and fast read, I would have preferred if Crichton had cut roughly a hundred pages of additional information that, in my opinion, did not add to the story. Other than that, wow! What an adrenaline-charging, action-packed book! Crichton sure knew how to grab his audience by the hand and take them on a roller-coaster into a whole other world—a world in which you are sure to get Lost, ha-ha!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Peter Meredith

    The Lost World is not a very good book. The story is a slog to start and the characters are very weak. So weak that if any of them had actually been eaten by the constantly hungry dinosaurs I would've been like: shrug. As the story progressed and I waited impatiently to find out: would they actually solve the mystery of the missing Dr Levine and go to the island of dinosaurs--as if there was a chance of that not happening--I was introduced to a series of these weak characters and it then became The Lost World is not a very good book. The story is a slog to start and the characters are very weak. So weak that if any of them had actually been eaten by the constantly hungry dinosaurs I would've been like: shrug. As the story progressed and I waited impatiently to find out: would they actually solve the mystery of the missing Dr Levine and go to the island of dinosaurs--as if there was a chance of that not happening--I was introduced to a series of these weak characters and it then became a struggle to decide who I wanted to be eaten first. Initially I really wanted one or both of the two genius kids to get chomped. Their place in the book was so formulaic, so PC, and so contrived that it marred the over-all story. They were there simply to add some emotion to a flat read. It didn't work since you just knew neither of them would die.(Side note: Every author should kill a main/well liked character every 5 or 6 books just to keep the possibility out there.) The next on my list of those characters who I wished would just get torn to shreds was Richard Levine, who was a know-it-all bore. It would've been good for him to have been killed very early in the book(maybe chapter 4?)--just as long as he didn't linger in his demise. Whenever Levine opened his mouth he would go on and on, until I found myself skimming. Third on my hit-list was Sarah Harding...I mean Dr Sarah Harding(Everyone has PhDs and multiple PhDs and everyone is all so brilliant that it's tiresome.) Though I would have liked to see Sarah become Dino-kibble it wasn't going to happen. She was a female Tarzan and it was a wonder she didn't kill a T-Rex with a spear. Uhg. I get tired of the PC world (Though to be fair the dinosaurs weren't at all scary. In one scene Dr Levine is stalking a T-rex on a bicycle, completely unafraid, which had me wondering: why did they come to rescue him?) Ironically, the only person that I really wanted to live was a character who had died in the first book. For some reason the author resurrects Ian Malcolm. If you remember, Malcolm hated dinosaurs, yet for some reason he tags along on expedition to a dinosaur infested island to find Levine, a man he really doesn't like. It's completely out of character for him and makes no sense. In fact in the first few chapters he's completely against the idea and then pop! He changes his mind with no real reason given. So all the characters suck and this is because they aren't in-depth people with strong desires and motivations, instead they are talking props. They all seemed to sit about either spewing sciencey knowledge or receiving sciencey knowledge; this they take turns at doing. And everyone is a genius, or so we are told. Judging by their actions however, they are a bunch of morons who deserve to be eaten. So much for the characters, how about the story itself? Dinosaurs are scary. Run everyone. Bad guys die. Good guys live. It was a cheap imitation of a good book: Jurassic Park. I wouldn't bother with this sequel.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This might turn out to be one of my favorite books of all time. I feel like there was so much to love. I don’t care if he was just cashing in on the success of the Jurassic Park movie. I’m not even mad that Malcolm’s death was retconned. What I’m mad about, is that Hollywood took a beautiful book and hacked it into pieces and tried to dazzle us with animatronic dinosaurs. Okay so I like animatronic dinosaurs too, but still- there was no need. The plot is this: Dr. Levine suspects something happen This might turn out to be one of my favorite books of all time. I feel like there was so much to love. I don’t care if he was just cashing in on the success of the Jurassic Park movie. I’m not even mad that Malcolm’s death was retconned. What I’m mad about, is that Hollywood took a beautiful book and hacked it into pieces and tried to dazzle us with animatronic dinosaurs. Okay so I like animatronic dinosaurs too, but still- there was no need. The plot is this: Dr. Levine suspects something happened that involved Dr. Ian Malcolm in Costa Rica six years ago. Of course, Malcolm denies it because NDAs and all that. But he says: “Get me physical proof of a dinosaur Lost World and I’ll help you on your Costa Rican dinosaur expedition.” So Levine snoops and snoops and eventually gets Malcolm the evidence he required. Dinosaur chaos ensues. Meanwhile, those bad guys over at Biosyn still want all the Dino tech for themselves, so they are in the distant background doing bad stuff. The science: I found all Malcolm’s musings on Chaos theory and order absolutely fascinating. Crichton makes it very accessible to the reader in a way that is thought provoking but also not difficult to understand. I’m glad he was resurrected because truth be told, he’s a much more interesting character than Dr. Grant. Sarah Harding. She’s basically Wonder Woman. I want to be Sarah Harding when I grow up. She is an example of a female heroine done right. I’m sad she was written by a man but Crichton did her justice. She’s strong. She’s brave. She knows what she wants and she goes and gets it. She is not a damsel in distress, and at NO point in this novel does she require rescuing from the men. In fact, they quite frequently needed rescuing from her. And that scene with Dodgson? Absolutely priceless. Her relationship with Kelly was perfect and I adored her for it. Kelly becomes a little Sarah Harding in her own right. Were there as many dinosaurs in this as in Jurassic Park? No. Did I mind? No. The characters and the story of their survival took front and center here and it was fantastic. I sort of think of it like I think of Spielberg’s production/direction strategy. Less is more. A ripple in a puddle. A thump in the distance. The threat is always there, but you can’t always see it. It’s your imagination that makes the horror real. The action scenes were all edge of your seat thrill rides. The classic trailer on the cliff scene was done much better in the book. The presence of children on the island heightened the suspense. My only word of warning: if you liked the movie before, you’ll probably be disappointed in it by the time you’re done reading The Lost World. Read it anyway. It’s worth it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    K.

    Trigger warnings: violence, blood, death, gore, near drowning, gore, animal death, seriously you guys there's so much gore. 11/11/2018 Sticking with 4.25 stars this time. I love this story a lot, and it's really interesting to see all the ways that Spielberg took a surprisingly solid story and turned it into a steaming turd of a film. 30/10/2017 On reread, I'm bumping this up to 4.25 stars. It's ten bazillion times better than the truly terrible movie of the same name. I love the two kids in the st Trigger warnings: violence, blood, death, gore, near drowning, gore, animal death, seriously you guys there's so much gore. 11/11/2018 Sticking with 4.25 stars this time. I love this story a lot, and it's really interesting to see all the ways that Spielberg took a surprisingly solid story and turned it into a steaming turd of a film. 30/10/2017 On reread, I'm bumping this up to 4.25 stars. It's ten bazillion times better than the truly terrible movie of the same name. I love the two kids in the story - they're smart and brave and save the day a bunch of times. And Sarah Harding is a pretty great alternative to Ellie Sattler. It's a little slower to get going than Jurassic Park, but it's still pretty damned fabulous. 24/9/2016 It takes a decent chunk of time for the story to get going in this one, but once it does, it's pretty damned fabulous. I mean, it's not Jurassic Park. But really, it was never going to be. And despite the big T.rexes-kicking-the-trailer-off-a-cliff scene, there seem to be less interactions with dinosaurs than there are in Jurassic Park?? Still, it's definitely worth a look. Honestly, I think my favourite thing in this book is something that I only noticed on this reread: somewhere around the turn of the century, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote a very silly but thoroughly enjoyable adventure novel called The Lost World in which a group of explorers travel to South America and discover a plateau on which dinosaurs still live. They've been largely domesticated by the lost tribes that live on the plateau, and the iguanodons hop around like kangaroos and it's terrible but also really great?? Anyway, while the exploration party is largely made up of scientists - and a newspaper reporter, who's telling the story - there's also a world-famous big game hunter named Lord John Roxton. And in THIS version of The Lost World? Crichton has his characters talk about a researcher named John Roxton, who wrote papers on something relevant to the story. It's a really subtle little Easter egg for those who've read both books, and I had this total "OH MY GOD, DID YOU JUST?????" moment when I spotted it. A+, Crichton. A+. 1/7/2013 It's been years since I read this book, and it was SO much better than I remembered. First of all, don't base it on the movie. The movie was a trainwreck of epic proportions and basically the only thing that's the same is the baby T. rex ending up with a broken leg and the trailer being pushed off the cliff. Literally everything else is different, and it's different in a GOOD way. There's far less of the science that Crichton got bogged down with in Jurassic Park, and what there is is sprinkled throughout the story. There are all the standard dinosaurs that you'd expect, but with the addition of some fun new species, including one with nifty camouflage abilities. In short, it's a lot of fun with the usual "kill off half the characters" that Crichton does. And don't even remotely judge it by the movie. If they'd kept even remotely true to the book, the movie probably would have been a LOT more successful than it was!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Eddie Owens

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Michael Crichton always gives good science and when you add in dinosaurs, it should be great. But it's not. It's a slow burner, no action for the first 200 pages, just lots of science. However, I like the way he educates the reader and tries to add a story in there. For instance, I now know why human babies are totally helpless for the first couple of years of their lives, whereas some baby animals can walk a few minutes after birth - you'll have to read the book to find out why. It's very obviou Michael Crichton always gives good science and when you add in dinosaurs, it should be great. But it's not. It's a slow burner, no action for the first 200 pages, just lots of science. However, I like the way he educates the reader and tries to add a story in there. For instance, I now know why human babies are totally helpless for the first couple of years of their lives, whereas some baby animals can walk a few minutes after birth - you'll have to read the book to find out why. It's very obvious that he is full of great ideas, but this plot is paper thin and the characters are all one dimensional. His experts are geniuses with little or no backstory, family or kids. His token woman is a tough naturalist, with little or no backstory, family or kids; and his two child heroes, are geniuses who cope astonishingly well, when their lives are under threat from man eating dinosaurs. This is either a screenplay adapted into a novel, or a novel that was written with a view to the screen adaptation.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I have to say that I do enjoy the writing style of Michael Crichton and although he has had his share of varying popularity I always feel I can trust his writing to deliver (even if to some that feels safe and uninspiring) Anyway I digress - this was the second of his Jurassic Park novels and again a loose basis for the film (it still fascinates me how the first book and film diverge, digressing again), however the film was such a success there is little of surprise to the book, for me it was mo I have to say that I do enjoy the writing style of Michael Crichton and although he has had his share of varying popularity I always feel I can trust his writing to deliver (even if to some that feels safe and uninspiring) Anyway I digress - this was the second of his Jurassic Park novels and again a loose basis for the film (it still fascinates me how the first book and film diverge, digressing again), however the film was such a success there is little of surprise to the book, for me it was more the pace. The book very quickly sets the scene and then throws you to the 'raptors as it were with action happening fast and nonstop. Now this could garner criticism in that its just one long theme park ride but if you are short of time to invest in characters or complex plots yet want something well written then this is ideal and at the moment that is what I am looking for. The Andromeda Strain is still one of my favourite books so I will be a little defensive of Michael Crichton but his book does not need it - it stands on its own - and as a creature feature it certainly delivers. Now with the rebooting of the film franchise I hope that his original books will also enjoy a resurgence of popularity as I know I will gladly re-read them with little encouragement

  10. 4 out of 5

    William Dalphin

    What I learned from The Lost World: The only people worthy of surviving in Crichton's world are geniuses. Everyone else is destined to be fodder/feed for terrorizing thunder lizards. The Lost World suffers from two things: First off, if you've ever read Jurassic Park, then you know that TLW's protagonist, Ian Malcolm, is, in fact, dead. That's right... he died in Jurassic Park, but since they couldn't convince Sam Neill to return for the movie, Crichton rewrote history so that Malcolm somehow sur What I learned from The Lost World: The only people worthy of surviving in Crichton's world are geniuses. Everyone else is destined to be fodder/feed for terrorizing thunder lizards. The Lost World suffers from two things: First off, if you've ever read Jurassic Park, then you know that TLW's protagonist, Ian Malcolm, is, in fact, dead. That's right... he died in Jurassic Park, but since they couldn't convince Sam Neill to return for the movie, Crichton rewrote history so that Malcolm somehow survived (never mind that they verified he was dead, and then the whole island was napalmed with his corpse on it). The second problem is that every single important person in The Lost World is some sort of certifiable genius. Malcolm's two tagalong kids are both gifted. Everyone who comes along is some form of expert of some field. The only people who aren't talented/gifted/smart are the regular folks, and they all end up being the bad guys of the book. Seriously, I'm not kidding. The good guys are all geniuses, and the bad guys are all... not. And, naturally, the geniuses survive because they are geniuses, while the bad guys all die because they are not so smart. The Lost World is Crichton's way of effectively kissing his own ass.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Karen’s Library

    Now that was really enjoyable!! I really loved all the science and theories.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bella

    Ok so this book gained an extra star because Lex was not in it. Hands down that originally made me want to give it five stars. But lets get to why this book got two stars. First off.... (view spoiler)[ Malcolm lived....yeah I am all for the fact he lived because I loved him in the film but in the book...WTF? He lived? He died of a rotten leg in the first book. Eddie died....yeah I called it early on that Eddie was going to die. Damnit Eddie, then I had to read about raptors fighting over his carc Ok so this book gained an extra star because Lex was not in it. Hands down that originally made me want to give it five stars. But lets get to why this book got two stars. First off.... (view spoiler)[ Malcolm lived....yeah I am all for the fact he lived because I loved him in the film but in the book...WTF? He lived? He died of a rotten leg in the first book. Eddie died....yeah I called it early on that Eddie was going to die. Damnit Eddie, then I had to read about raptors fighting over his carcass. Sarah...mother fucker is die hard. Plot::::: Holy shit Batman balls..... THE RAPTORS TOOK ARBY HOSTAGE....Took.Him.Hostage. I'm going to let that sink in for a moment. Took.Him.Hostage. in a mother fucking cage.....They carried the cage off and took him hostage....Like, what they are going to sit down and negotiate with Malcolm? In the end they all have mad cow disease but it's ok cause even though nobody knows what is going to happen if a dinosaur with mad cow disease bites you, lets all sail into the sunset and yeah be assured because Sarah said a mild case of encephalitis would most likely occur....Yeah...'mild' because she is an expert at what???? OOOHHH right, hyenas in Africa. (hide spoiler)] And that is why I gave this book two stars.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ashley *Hufflepuff Kitten*

    I still maintain that without Ian Malcolm this book would've received a 2-2.5 star rating because without his snark I would've been bored to deathhhh. As it is, 4 stars feels generous but that ending just put me in a good mood. Good book, not sure it was necessary because nothing will top the original, but Malcolm spits so much truth about theories and what humans think we know that I'd say it deserves a read if you liked Jurassic Park. ...Can we have the new Jurassic World movie now plz?

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Firmage

    Better than the first book and great narration by Anthony Heald. A sense of peril that is not evident in the film.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Krystal

    Not even close to as amazing as the first book, but this still has some great dino moments and absolutely fascinating ideas. WARNING: This review contains unhidden spoilers for Jurassic Park. The sequel is a little slow to get into. It's been six years since the events of the first book, but it's all been covered up and the people involved deny having been a part of anything. Hammond has stayed dead (unlike Malcolm) so we need a new reason to head back into dino territory and that reason comes in Not even close to as amazing as the first book, but this still has some great dino moments and absolutely fascinating ideas. WARNING: This review contains unhidden spoilers for Jurassic Park. The sequel is a little slow to get into. It's been six years since the events of the first book, but it's all been covered up and the people involved deny having been a part of anything. Hammond has stayed dead (unlike Malcolm) so we need a new reason to head back into dino territory and that reason comes in the form of a curious scientist, Levine, who strikes up a bizarre friendship with Malcolm based on the theoretical idea of a 'lost world' - an isolated location where animals previously considered extinct may have actually survived. Thing is, this is the theory that starts us off, but it's a pretty flawed theory because these animals didn't survive - they're a product of Hammond's greed, which was so beautifully destructive in the first book. Obviously we already know there's going to be living dinosaurs, and as soon as they mention 'Site B' you can pretty much rule out natural occurrence. So why bother with Levine's ridiculous theory in the first place? The science is this book both fascinated and frustrated me. There's so much of it, and honestly I loved how crazy the theories were but I'm pretty sure if you actually knew a bit about science and examined this you'd pick out a lot of flaws. But, since this book is smarter than me, I kinda just went with it and appreciated learning all these new things about biology, evolution, extinction, chaos, etc. But it comes thick and fast and this book is far more interested in examining theories of dinosaur behaviour and extinction than bringing the thrills and chills that the first book delivered so brilliantly. Malcolm has a ton of info dumps and it's hard to keep up, meaning the pace really drags at times. I was never bored though? I was really interested in all the behaviour discussions, but as for proteins and chemicals it kinda just whooshed on over my head. It was fun to try and comprehend it, though, and act like I was smart. The dinosaurs that we meet are familiar faces, but they seem far less antagonistic in this one, and everything is 'fascinating, unusual behaviour' rather than 'HOLY JEEZUZ THE DINOS ARE GONNA EAT US.' Which made me sad, because I am a twisted person who enjoys reading about fictional people suffering gruesome deaths at the hands of dinosaurs and other savage creatures. It doesn't really amp up until about 3/4 of the way through, but at least the ending is action-packed! I probably would have enjoyed less raptors because they did all the menacing of the first book so I was ready for something different. Also just would have been nice to have new dinos to learn about. But hey, who can really complain about those savage velociraptor claws? The characters blended together a little bit again, but you could also kinda guess who was going to end up as dino-chow. The kids were less annoying, but Arby was like a washed out copy of Tim from the first novel, so he and Kelly didn't really bring much to the table. Also they seemed a bit unbelievable for a couple of 13yr olds. I liked Sarah, and I liked that she was gung-ho, but I did think it was a bit much at times? (She was far more annoying in the movie, though. Book Sarah I can actually stand. Movie Sarah needed to be trampled by triceratops or ravaged by raptors.) Malcolm had so much sass in the first book but he's relegated to snarky scientist in this one so it takes out a bit of the fun. I do still love him as a character though. I like that he's so cynical. I love the setting, and this idea that there's these dinosaurs living on their own private island roaming free. The whole 'studying extinction' side of things was a bit of a mess, but meh. I wasn't particularly invested in their research, anyway. I just wanted plenty of interactions. Crichton writes the interactions and encounters wonderfully - he has a gift at creating suspense and formulating a fantastic visual to accompany the story. There was some great tension throughout. It doesn't quite live up to the first book, but there's still some fascinating ideas and suspenseful moments. This book has solidified my love of Crichton's work, so I'll be working my way through his books in the future.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ali (the bandar blog)

    In case you missed it, not too long ago I was raving about Jurassic Park. I hadn't read the book before and was instantly obsessed. Needless to say, I was quick to pick up The Lost World, because sequels = more dinosaurs. While I didn't end up obsessing over The Lost World quite as much as JP, the 12-year-old boy in me was still satisfied by T-Rex scares, human-eating dinosaurs, and terrifying AF raptors. What I didn't like quite as much: It seemed just a tad-bit more science-y. Lots and lots In case you missed it, not too long ago I was raving about Jurassic Park. I hadn't read the book before and was instantly obsessed. Needless to say, I was quick to pick up The Lost World, because sequels = more dinosaurs. While I didn't end up obsessing over The Lost World quite as much as JP, the 12-year-old boy in me was still satisfied by T-Rex scares, human-eating dinosaurs, and terrifying AF raptors. What I didn't like quite as much: It seemed just a tad-bit more science-y. Lots and lots of talk about things I personally didn't care as much about. Um, excuse me, but when is the T-Rex gonna show up? The plot just wasn't as fun for me (it's still good, though!). JP is all about this cool new place- everything is optimistic and exciting. Then it all spirals out of control and gets crappy. This book is about perhaps finding the remnants of Jurassic Park, so as a reader I knew everything wasn't going to be all hunky-dory this time. I knew it was going to be bad. I missed that false sense of security that JP had -- it made things slightly more fun for me. What was freaking awesome: THE T-REX(s, YES PLURAL). I'm seriously obsessed. Every time I would be listening to this audiobook and it'd start describing loud crashing sounds or big steps that caused the ground to vibrate I'd get so freaking giddy. There's all sorts of fun people-running-away-from-dinosaurs bits in this. It's exciting and scary and perfect! The enemies get what they deserve (and it's usually in the form of munching dinosaur teeth). The bottom line? READ THESE BOOKS. They're too much fun to pass up. See my rave review of Jurassic Park here! Have you read this one? How did you feel it compared to Jurassic Park? How is the movie? I haven't seen it yet but will probably watch it, because dinosaurs.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Deslni01

    Michael Crichton's The Lost World is an interesting piece of work. On the one hand, it is an exciting, page-gripping, edge of the seat thriller reminiscent of the first Jurassic Park novel. On the other hand, it is exactly that: reminiscent of the first Jurassic Park novel. In many ways, it is merely a rehash of the original. Ian Malcolm returns, as does Dodgson, there are other dinosaur and mammalian experts involved (of course, they are all considered the best in the world), and the story coul Michael Crichton's The Lost World is an interesting piece of work. On the one hand, it is an exciting, page-gripping, edge of the seat thriller reminiscent of the first Jurassic Park novel. On the other hand, it is exactly that: reminiscent of the first Jurassic Park novel. In many ways, it is merely a rehash of the original. Ian Malcolm returns, as does Dodgson, there are other dinosaur and mammalian experts involved (of course, they are all considered the best in the world), and the story could not be complete without two out-of-place brilliant children with knowledge and skills well above their actual level - particularly in the field of computers.[return][return]But that must be taken with a grain of salt, and Crichton forgiven, as he never planned on writing a sequel. It was only after many, many people, ranging from film producers to fans of both the novel and the movie pressured him into it.[return][return]Although many aspects are similar, that does not make the book any less appealing. With dinosaurs running amok, creating chaos, how can it be a bad read? This time, Ian Malcolm makes another appearance by wanting to visit the island and see the dinosaurs again. In that regard, his personality is very different than readers are accustomed - that, and he is alive, which he wasn't at the end of the first novel. One of his colleagues finds Site B, another island where dinosaurs were being produced for the park. Naturally, said colleague visits it alone, and Ian and several other colleagues must rescue him.[return][return]Of note are the reasons for the velociraptor's unseemly lifestyle - because as recreated animals they are missing a very important part of evolution: the social aspect. Also interesting are Malcolm's discussions on evolution and Darwins theory. Crichton was no slouch when researching what he wrote about, and this is no exception. Of course, Crichton has an agenda in writing such a book, and that is to beware human existence and technological advancement. As Malcolm said,[return][return]Human beings are so destructive, I sometimes think we're a kind of plague, that will scrub the earth clean. We destroy things so well that I sometimes think, maybe that's our function. Maybe every few eons, some animal comes along that kills off the rest of the world, clears the deck, and lets evolution proceed to its next stage.[return][return]The Lost World is a thrilling adventure that should not be missed by any reader who enjoys dinosaurs, thrillers, excitement or adventure. And since nearly everyone likes dinosaurs, it should be a required read...for most. For those that dislike the character Dodgson from both the original and the beginning of The Lost World, it is worth finishing merely to see Dodgson's comeuppance.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Arybo ✨

    È come Jurassic Park, ma sbiadito. Ci sono tutti i contenuti del primo libro (dinosauri, isola, umani stupidi ed avidi, umani scienziati e più attenti , matematici e geni del computer, ragazzini), ma il tutto si armonizza di meno.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Note to self: if I am EVER stuck on an island with dinosaurs, do not be a jerk or I'm guaranteed to be eaten by a T-Rex. Also, if I ever need to look up anything on a computer, ask a kid because apparently adults cannot operate them. The Jurassic Park adventures are always fun. One thing I especially liked about this book is the woman scientist was one of the strongest and most competent of the team. (The movie drove me crazy because the so-called African animal expert took blood soaked stuff INT Note to self: if I am EVER stuck on an island with dinosaurs, do not be a jerk or I'm guaranteed to be eaten by a T-Rex. Also, if I ever need to look up anything on a computer, ask a kid because apparently adults cannot operate them. The Jurassic Park adventures are always fun. One thing I especially liked about this book is the woman scientist was one of the strongest and most competent of the team. (The movie drove me crazy because the so-called African animal expert took blood soaked stuff INTO HER TENT while trying to hide from predators...). Other than her, I pretty much wanted everyone to die - wow just like Jaws a couple weeks ago. I guess the kids were ok - someone needs to be able to log into the computers and they were the only ones who knew how. The adults were pretty good at yelling at the poor kids to hurry up though. And Malcom...sigh...his function in the book seemed to be to spout long lectures on the philosophy of evolution, extinction, etc. There is a time and place for those, and sure, it can be interesting - but when you are being hunted by dinosaurs is not that time! I did enjoy the book, and would have given it another star if a couple more of the adults had been eaten.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rosie (mrsbunnymum)

    Not as good as the first one, but still great. It's very sciencey and if that's your thing, then you'll love this too. I personally love the more sciencey side of things and can totally relate to Ian Malcolm and the other scientists whenever they correct people's use of common animal names and instinctively blurt out the scientific name. I do that too. I feel like there was a little less action this time round and some people would probably dislike that but obviously we've moved past the first s Not as good as the first one, but still great. It's very sciencey and if that's your thing, then you'll love this too. I personally love the more sciencey side of things and can totally relate to Ian Malcolm and the other scientists whenever they correct people's use of common animal names and instinctively blurt out the scientific name. I do that too. I feel like there was a little less action this time round and some people would probably dislike that but obviously we've moved past the first stage of the park and now we're dealing with the drama from the first book as well as investigating the survival of dinosaurs. A really good read!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Enrique

    Well to be honest, I had watched the film adaptation before reading the novel. I loved the film especially with the Big Rex attacking my hometown. (Sadly the news never reported it). Now I had begun reading it kind of late, since I could only find a copy of it at Barnes&Nobels but I begun reading! Now when I did read the novel I tried to clear my mind and not try to expect alot from it. However when I actually did get to reading the Lost World I was slightly dissapointed. To be frank I think Well to be honest, I had watched the film adaptation before reading the novel. I loved the film especially with the Big Rex attacking my hometown. (Sadly the news never reported it). Now I had begun reading it kind of late, since I could only find a copy of it at Barnes&Nobels but I begun reading! Now when I did read the novel I tried to clear my mind and not try to expect alot from it. However when I actually did get to reading the Lost World I was slightly dissapointed. To be frank I think I was expecting a lot of the awe dropping and suspensful moments of the film, which wern't as good. A large portion of the book was conversation theories between the intellectual cast which I undestand but felt it dragged on to long. However the ideas were very impressive and got me to question what I know on past species of extinct animals. After all no one around today was there when Baryonyx was in our back yards. Something I did like though was how Ian Malcom was the central protagonist this time around. It was kind of funny since in the first novel he was basically this "Chaotician" who joined along for the ride at the park with all these dino experts who critisized everything (What made me laugh was that he was right) and now we see him kind of leading things and having his own ideas on the dinosaurs which almost makes him look like a different character. he did definately differ from his film counterpart but I think he was a better character in the novel version. This like Jurassic Park was a long buddy of mine since I couldn't put the book down. The Lost World just got me interested despite certain parts. However the book had overall made me interested and think about certain ideas overlooked. Personally I would recommend it, but then have whoever reads it watch the film adaptation if they had some issues.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    Jurassic Park was pretty good, but this book was rather poor. It reads like a bad movie. The author is so intent upon pushing Chaos Theory upon the reader that he often forces the characters to behave way, way, WAY out of their habits in order to force things to go wrong. People suddenly do really stupid things. People forget that they have weapons. All attempts to prepare for a situation automatically fail, because it's completely impossible (not just improbable) for a prepared individual to act Jurassic Park was pretty good, but this book was rather poor. It reads like a bad movie. The author is so intent upon pushing Chaos Theory upon the reader that he often forces the characters to behave way, way, WAY out of their habits in order to force things to go wrong. People suddenly do really stupid things. People forget that they have weapons. All attempts to prepare for a situation automatically fail, because it's completely impossible (not just improbable) for a prepared individual to actually be ready to face the situation he was preparing for. Even the identities of the characters were engineerd to be movie-friendly. As he wrote this book, the author knew that he would have a film deal upon completion. He constructed the story so that Hollywood wouldn't have to work too hard to dumb it down. I won't spoil the ending, but you should know that it was stupid. It involved the best animal scientists in the world making a mistake that would have been caught by the folks at your local zoo. It was kind of like watching people play craps in an alley with a math professor. Each time the dice are thrown, the guy runs forward, picks them up and carefully sets them down with a less favorable result, all the while ranting about how random everything is. In a situation like that, the other guys in the alley would have just beaten the tar out of him. That's what I wanted to do when I read this. It's a dumb book which hides behind a bunch of big, smart words. Don't bother with it. If you watch the movie you'll at least get to see the dinosaurs running around.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    Having recently re-read Jurassic Park, I realized that I had never bothered with the sequel. I am glad I did but it wasn't all that great. It did not measure up to the 1st one at all. There is far less action and WAY more talk. I felt that this was Crighton's way of spewing some interesting and some not so interesting facts out into the world. It seemed that he needed his readers to know all about complicated math theorems, evolution and extinction, et al. Sadly he used the character, Ian Malcolm Having recently re-read Jurassic Park, I realized that I had never bothered with the sequel. I am glad I did but it wasn't all that great. It did not measure up to the 1st one at all. There is far less action and WAY more talk. I felt that this was Crighton's way of spewing some interesting and some not so interesting facts out into the world. It seemed that he needed his readers to know all about complicated math theorems, evolution and extinction, et al. Sadly he used the character, Ian Malcolm as his platform for delivering all this gobbledygook. He had Malcolm in a morphine dream just ranting and preaching for chapters on end! Come on! Malcolm spent the 2nd half of this book injured and half delirious. He spent more than the 2nd half of the 1st book injured, as well! So, I gave this book 3 stars instead of 2 because there was a little bit of excitement when Sarah Harding, the only women amongst a bunch a men, saved everyone's life, including both children. She starred in dramatic scene after dramatic scene while she went around saving everyone. Seriously! I also rounded up with my rating because I happen to find any discussion regarding evolution my glass of wine. It is one subject I LOVE to discuss or read about. However, if you were reading this book hoping to find a sci-FY adventure story, you may be disappointed with the amount of textbook-like information the author plants into conversations between the characters.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Corey

    The Lost World takes place six years after the Jurassic Park incident, and just like in the movie version, Dr. Alan Grant and Dr. Sattler did not return but Dr. Ian Malcolm does return for his role. The Lost World was an entertaining read, although I'll say not as good as Jurassic Park, for a number of reasons, but I won't go into all of them. I found myself skipping through some of the unnecessary parts that weren't really important to the story but when I came to some of the important parts I The Lost World takes place six years after the Jurassic Park incident, and just like in the movie version, Dr. Alan Grant and Dr. Sattler did not return but Dr. Ian Malcolm does return for his role. The Lost World was an entertaining read, although I'll say not as good as Jurassic Park, for a number of reasons, but I won't go into all of them. I found myself skipping through some of the unnecessary parts that weren't really important to the story but when I came to some of the important parts I was hooked. A lot of new dinosaurs are introduced to us in this book that were not in Jurassic Park, a lot of them I'd never even heard of, some of them I even needed to Google them to see if they were even real since this book was fiction, and they were real. The book was very different from the movie, and to me there didn't really seem to be any similarities accept the character of Sarah Harding who was played by Julianne Moore (Who I've always had a big crush on, HAHA) in the movie. Some parts of the story seemed to drag but it also did have some really nail-biting parts and many twists and turns throughout. Like I said, it's not up there with Jurassic Park but still worth reading.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Carmine

    Quando i dinosauri dominavano la terra Divertente intrattenimento da leggere sotto l'ombrellone. Persa completamente la profondità contenutistica dell'opera precedente, l'infausto ritorno a Isla Sorna promette frizzanti guazzabugli preistorici con dinosauri esagitati e piuttosto birichini. Certo, lo svolgimento è piuttosto scolastico e non aiuta l'oramai assente fattore sorpresa (vantaggio di cui il primo libro e relativo adattamento cinematografico hanno goduto).

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cathy (cathepsut)

    Read it, liked it, Jurassic Park was better. What I loved about this book and still remember pretty well--it taught me about Chaos Theory, which fascinated me for quite a while after reading this.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    Great read

  28. 4 out of 5

    P. Lundburg

    For me, a disappointment after the first Jurassic Park, but still a great read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Arun Divakar

    Some people you know and some books you read might have one thing in common in that the one you meet after decades might not be the same as you remember them. Some changes might be subtle while others may be overt and very visible. Since here we talk only about books, over time big parts of the story have been forgotten by your mind . Some scenes at times can be recollected but then the part of your mind that deals with reading keeps asking itself "Was this how it was earlier ? " During my child Some people you know and some books you read might have one thing in common in that the one you meet after decades might not be the same as you remember them. Some changes might be subtle while others may be overt and very visible. Since here we talk only about books, over time big parts of the story have been forgotten by your mind . Some scenes at times can be recollected but then the part of your mind that deals with reading keeps asking itself "Was this how it was earlier ? " During my childhood when I was obsessed with Jurassic Park, the sequel was something I relished and read time and again. But now after all these years it dawns on me that while they are by the same author and even feature a sense of continuity, these two novels are not of the same breed. It is unfair to draw comparisons and yet there was a sense of this story walking over very well worn terrain and that felt like a let-down for me. To borrow from the title, the key characters of this novel explore a clichéd lost world : the land that time forgot and one where dinosaurs still roam free. The only difference from yesteryears pulp being that this is an island off the coast of Costa Rica and that the dinosaurs are the creation of InGen . The acerbic and pedantic mathematician Ian Malcolm returns to the fray leading a rag tag bunch of adventurers. All of them are in search of someone from their own crew who went missing while exploring the island. Their encounters with the dinosaurs and eventual escape is what the story is all about. Let me tell you about some things that did not connect with me while reading it again : 1. Character Motivations : Ian Malcolm is a first class sceptic and a man with a scalpel sharp intellect which means convincing him on something which he does not buy into is going to be a very difficult task. Sarah Harding is a field biologist and a person of science and like Malcolm possesses a hard and no-nonsense intellect. To them finding an island filled with dinosaurs is as improbable as finding a hitchhiking alien on the streets of America. And yet the character of Richard Levine convinces Malcolm to make a visit to the dinosaur isle in just two pages flat. And Sarah Harding ? Well, all it takes a one minute phone call for her to hop on a plane from Africa and come to Costa Rica in search of Richard Levine. Crichton makes it amply clear that there is no love lost between Harding and Levine and yet she does not think twice before leaving her field research and travelling to Costa Rica (which she had not much prior knowledge about). There does not seem to be any motivation for both these principal characters to jump headlong into this adventure and it felt flimsy. 2.Plot Premise : The biotech company that built these dinosaurs went bust but their creations kept roaming the island. Crichton is smart enough to bypass the question of why the animals never appeared much on mainland by introducing a biological puzzle too. While in Jurassic Park a failing system spelled disaster for everyone, here the remnants of a decade old failed experiment caused all the mischief. Even so I missed the menace of JP : a man-made place where things went south and the reader was kept guessing as to where it was all headed. Here was a landscape right out of classics from Conan Doyle to King Kong and all these past works ensured that there was not much of suspense to grasp on to. 3.Dinosaurs : My gut feel was that Crichton leaned a bit too much on the success of Jurassic Park as a film franchise and brought back the fan favourites - Velociraptors and T rexes. While they are exciting and terrifying as predators, the overuse of them over the years meant that the novelty has worn off. We now are moving in a direction where Chris Pratt makes raptors listen to him ! The Carnotaurus pair were a chilling addition to the carnivorous dinosaurs of the series and considering that a lot of action takes place at night, it would have made it all the more thrilling to give them more of a presence in the story. Either the story has lost a bit of charm over years or I have become much more of a cynic. I prefer to think it is the latter !

  30. 4 out of 5

    Janice

    Obviously, there are braver souls than me, even if they are fictional. I'm content to read about these characters who willingly share space with T-Rex and Velociraptors. It's safe in my armchair and I don't need to worry about being some dinosaur's next lunch. There were thrills and chills, and there was science and theory. Get the adrenaline up, then bore us to tears with dry facts. Perhaps it's a good balance. Still, it was fun to imagine.

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