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The Dangerous Art of Blending In

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Seventeen-year-old Evan Panos doesn’t know where he fits in. His strict Greek mother refuses to see him as anything but a disappointment. His quiet, workaholic father is a staunch believer in avoiding any kind of conflict. And his best friend Henry has somehow become distractingly attractive over the summer. Tired, isolated, scared—Evan’s only escape is drawing in an aband Seventeen-year-old Evan Panos doesn’t know where he fits in. His strict Greek mother refuses to see him as anything but a disappointment. His quiet, workaholic father is a staunch believer in avoiding any kind of conflict. And his best friend Henry has somehow become distractingly attractive over the summer. Tired, isolated, scared—Evan’s only escape is drawing in an abandoned church that feels as lonely as he is. And, yes, he kissed one guy over the summer. But it’s his best friend Henry who’s now proving to be irresistible. It’s Henry who suddenly seems interested in being more than friends. And it’s Henry who makes him believe that he’s more than his mother’s harsh words and terrifying abuse. But as things with Henry heat up, and his mother’s abuse escalates, Evan has to decide how to find his voice in a world where he has survived so long by avoiding attention at all costs.


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Seventeen-year-old Evan Panos doesn’t know where he fits in. His strict Greek mother refuses to see him as anything but a disappointment. His quiet, workaholic father is a staunch believer in avoiding any kind of conflict. And his best friend Henry has somehow become distractingly attractive over the summer. Tired, isolated, scared—Evan’s only escape is drawing in an aband Seventeen-year-old Evan Panos doesn’t know where he fits in. His strict Greek mother refuses to see him as anything but a disappointment. His quiet, workaholic father is a staunch believer in avoiding any kind of conflict. And his best friend Henry has somehow become distractingly attractive over the summer. Tired, isolated, scared—Evan’s only escape is drawing in an abandoned church that feels as lonely as he is. And, yes, he kissed one guy over the summer. But it’s his best friend Henry who’s now proving to be irresistible. It’s Henry who suddenly seems interested in being more than friends. And it’s Henry who makes him believe that he’s more than his mother’s harsh words and terrifying abuse. But as things with Henry heat up, and his mother’s abuse escalates, Evan has to decide how to find his voice in a world where he has survived so long by avoiding attention at all costs.

30 review for The Dangerous Art of Blending In

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elise (TheBookishActress)

    I am so sorry, but I am not giving this review a fair introduction or summary. Two things. One, I'm slightly bothered that Evan’s entire character arc is driven by romance, which is shitty itself in a book about abuse. Two, I'm bothered by the fact that the romance itself is an on fire garbage can. I want to get into the romance as a character arc thing first. Because guys, Evan doesn’t have an arc in this book beyond the messily written one he has because of Henry. And obviously, that’s an anno I am so sorry, but I am not giving this review a fair introduction or summary. Two things. One, I'm slightly bothered that Evan’s entire character arc is driven by romance, which is shitty itself in a book about abuse. Two, I'm bothered by the fact that the romance itself is an on fire garbage can. I want to get into the romance as a character arc thing first. Because guys, Evan doesn’t have an arc in this book beyond the messily written one he has because of Henry. And obviously, that’s an annoyance in any book, right? Too boring. But in a book about a suicidal boy trying to recover from abuse, it’s downright disturbing. The most important thing to get out of an abusive environment is a support system. A romantic relationship that could turn abusive itself? Not a good cure for abuse. Consistent abuse fact – a relationship is not a healthy endeavor until some degree of inner mental recovery is already occurring. Evan is not in a good place to proceed in a serious relationship when his relationship with Henry begins - he is unsure of his sexuality, suicidal, and essentially hanging on to life by a thread. He has not at all begun a recovery process, even an inner one, and the narrative of this book is not, in my opinion, cognizant of that. What a person in his situation needs is a support system of people who want what is best for him and are willing to step away when he needs them to. Henry is not that, nor can any teenager - or any one person - be that. This message is one not of empowerment, but of romance being the cure for an abusive situation. Obviously Evan is in his own situation and that can't be helped, but it feels as if the narrative doesn't know there's any danger in that situation. As is touched on in books like Heather Demetrios’ Bad Romance, turning to romance as a cure for abuse can lead to further abuse. Abuse survivors sometimes lack support systems - true for Evan - or the type of self-esteem they need - also very true for Evan. And it’s this fact, above any other, that makes this specific romance so completely disturbing. I know getting pissed off at cure-romance tropes in books about abuse is basically my brand now, but seriously, this is a really messed-up romance and relationship. →why this romance feels toxic: a discussion← Evan is a teenager dealing with severe abuse who is still struggling with his sexuality and most importantly, has no support system beyond Henry. 🌺 Okay, so Evan has no support system beyond Henry - no family members, no caring friends, not one other person who is aware of the abuse. This is not inherently horrible thing; Evan’s situation is difficult and turning to others seems, to him, likely to backfire. If Henry were kind and patient with Evan and allowed him space and a chance to make his own decisions, that might be one thing. But it is my opinion that the dynamic between Evan and Henry in this situation leaves Evan a lack of choice in proceeding with this relationship. Take this quote [emphasis mine]: [approximately page 99.] “Evan,” he whispers. “I want to be the one that makes you feel better.” [approximately page 143.] “Ev, I want to be the one you trust.” I am so sorry, but this reads like Henry wants this relationship because he wants to be “the one” who makes Evan feel better. This reads like isolation. 🌸 Henry, who as we’ve mentioned is Evan’s ONLY CONFIDANTE, gets angry - actually, physically angry - at Evan multiple times during this book for... well, the intention might be Evan's fair-weather friendship, but it reads like Henry is angry at Evan for being unsure about a romantic relationship. Being upset by your friend’s ignorance of friendship is understandable, but Henry’s desire for a romantic relationship with Evan is not an acceptable reason to be angry at Evan. Though the book is later very clear that Evan has wanted this relationship all along, Henry has no way of knowing that. The power dynamic between them is skewed in this situation, something which neither the characters nor the meta-narrative seem to be aware of. 🌺 Henry’s prioritization of his own feelings over Evan’s is disturbing at best. In one major scene, Henry feels abandoned by Evan. He responds to this by yelling at Evan for leaving him and guilting him into a romantic relationship. Evan is given little agency within the scene. [approximately page 142.] I stand there silent and in awe of this boy in front of me who is so raw, trusting, open. This one person who has never judged me. “You have to say something. Don’t leave me out here alone and don’t you dare fucking leave.” “What?” “That’s what you do. You just leave. Don’t do this to me. Not now. I’m fucking putting out so much stuff and if you just pull your shit...” 🌸 The consent issues are... kinda disturbing. [approximately page 99. ] “I'm staring at the statue and and I shift my body slightly away from Henry. He takes the waistband of my of my sweatshirt in his hand and pulls me in a bit. I put my head down, still turning away. He nudges himself even close and starts to slowly life the shirt over my head. I feel paralyzed, scared, thrilled. I stop him. 'Henry. Please.' He's close enough that I can smell the mint chip ice cream on his breath. Henry whispers, 'Ev, I want to be the one that helps you feel better.' Using whatever willpower I can grab on to, I pull away and say 'No. This isn't what you want. What I want.'” So, okay, in one of the first romantic scenes of the book, Henry tries to take Evan’s shirt off his body and see his scars without any sort of consent even after Evan explicitly says no. And ignoring that the earlier page 142 quote is sort of badly written, it occurs one paragraph before they kiss. Evan does not ever say yes to said kiss, and the way it was written did not feel totally consensual to me. Here's the passage: [approximately page 143.] “Instead I say, 'I'm scared.' 'Me too, but also not scared.' He walks over to where I'm standing. He's now right in front of me. My skin feels tingly. He grabs the bottom of my shirt with both hands and pulls me close to him. I stop breathing. He shifts himself even closer and starts putting his hand under my shirt toward my back. I feel paralyzed, scared, thrilled. As if ice water is pumping inside my body. He leans in closer. I can feel his breath on my skin. He whispers, 'Ev, I want to be the one you trust.' ...he leans in and kisses me, full soft, hard, and without any hesitation.” Okay. So Evan is actually enjoying this moment, and I hate to be a buzzkill, but Henry has no indication that he is enjoying this or wants this. The last thing Evan has said before this first kiss is “I’m scared” - which is in reference to internalized homophobia, but again, Henry doesn't know that. He is clearly paralyzed. He has not actually said - or really indicated? - that he is attracted to Henry. It's not just these two scenes - it's more the trend. There's another scene - I'll try to find the quotes soon - Henry sticks his hand under Evan’s thigh while Henry’s family is in the car and while they are on the outs, something Evan and I share equal levels of discomfort around. How is sticking your hand under your ex's thigh in a car with your family - when your ex is not even out of the closet- acceptable behavior? I don't know, dudes, it feels like there's barely any consent in this relationship. Almost all of their kisses are initiated by Henry, and many romantic interactions are initiated when Evan's only outward expression is "no". 🌺 Though this may be a fault of bad writing, Henry has extreme mood swings and his moods and emotions seem to change on the dot. In one scene, he goes from smiling in one paragraph to saying he’d like to hurt Evan’s mom in the next. [approximately page 143.] He turns to me, smiling. “Where are we going?” I briefly glance back at him and then I look back at the road. “Patience.” In a moment I say, “I shouldn’t believe in anything. Sometimes I don’t. I used to pray for God to help me and that never happened, but maybe that’s the way it works.” “I know what I want to do would cause more pain and trouble for you.” Henry’s voice sounds dark. Henry is in fact referring to hurting Evan’s abusive mom. But guys, notice the huge mood swing? I did. This feels, to me, like the precursor of an abusive relationship. And Henry is also, as I think this paragraph exemplifies to some degree, sort of angry and threatening around Evan despite knowing Evan is in a physically abusive situation. He says he wants to hurt or kill Evan’s mom multiple times, to a point where Evan feels the need to talk him down, which feels... kinda bad? Talk down your partner from anger all the time, because that's super healthy. This IS a book by an actual survivor of abuse, and I absolutely respect that he was able to tell this story. And aside from the scenes between Evan and Henry, I don’t think this book was completely horrid. The scene with the priest and Evan is one of the most powerful scenes I have read ever. And a few scenes in which Evan's mom is nice to him after weeks of horrifying comments are scarily accurate to experiences I’ve had. It is so valuable to have books about queer abuse survivors in our culture today, and this book was something I was so hoping to love. I'd really recommending reading some great books about lgbtq abuse survivors - Ashley Herring Blake's How to Make a Wish or Alice Oseman's Radio Silence - these two are both ownvoices - or even the damn Raven Cycle. Books like these are incredibly important, and though I heavily disliked this one, I'm happy books like these are out on the market - that our stories even have a chance to be published is amazing. But I just can’t recommend this in good conscience. Blog | Goodreads | Twitter | Youtube

  2. 5 out of 5

    C.G. Drews

    Oh wow this was both heartbreaking and hopeful and brutal. I knew it was going to be an emotional one but afjdsakfld the ending basically had me feeling at least 4 things all at once which is RIDICULOUS as I am a Vulcan and emotion as bread. It's full of art and abuse and hiding who you truly are and the absolute craving of love. Someone get me a bucket. I'm cosplaying a waterfall. + It's about domestic violence and it's so so heartbreaking. Evan's mother basically hides her (not named but very ob Oh wow this was both heartbreaking and hopeful and brutal. I knew it was going to be an emotional one but afjdsakfld the ending basically had me feeling at least 4 things all at once which is RIDICULOUS as I am a Vulcan and emotion as bread. It's full of art and abuse and hiding who you truly are and the absolute craving of love. Someone get me a bucket. I'm cosplaying a waterfall. + It's about domestic violence and it's so so heartbreaking. Evan's mother basically hides her (not named but very obvious) mental illness behind her religion: and uses it as an excuse to beat her "wicked and sinful" son. It's...it's so hard to read...Evan is just so beaten down, on the inside as well. He believes he's ugly and unworthy and evil and it's ALL he can do to try and be the "perfect Greek son" plus keep the fact that he's gay hidden. And it's so sickening because everyone around him basically just stands back and pretends the abuse isn't happening. I'm really glad the book actually pointed at that. It's unfair and hard to read but really really true to life. + Evan is such a gorgeous character though. He's an artist but has a really low opinion of his work (EVAN YOU IS KIND, YOU IS SMART, YOU IS IMPORTANT). He's the most precious cinnamon but also he breaks my heart with how, whenever someone is nice to him, he pushes them away. It's SO good the book didn't just show the depth of physical abuse, but it actually outlined the effects too. + AND EVAN AND HENRY. WHAT A GIFT. I do wish Henry had been a little deeper as a character (I really don't feel we got to know him?!) but I love how he and Evan were just BFFs and it was developing into more and how they learned to take care of each other and afldksad. Also, epically, the romance wasn't a "oh Henry's here to save him". Henry is not the salvation. EVAN is his own salvation. Bless. + The story wasn't super fast, but in a good way?! We get to see Evan's life and I love that he and his dad went out for donuts (although is dad just basically stood by when Evan got abused by his mum soooo: 98% mad at him still). And there is SO MUCH GREEK FOOD. I may have eaten my paperback. There's also a lot of religion and I don't think the book slams religion or anything, but it reminded me of Autoboyography in that it DID point out where religion often ignores/fails/condemns minorities. + Also this is a hella personal #ownvoices story. There's an author's note in the back, and I think this is like super close to the author's own Greek/coming-out story. It makes my heart very full when authors share such intimate pieces of themselves and just absolute RESPECT HERE. + My literal only critique is that it felt like a debut. Haha okay that was super specific, Cait, you bucket. It's just a lot of the dialogue didn't feel natural and I feel it needed more body language? Like everyone went from 0 to 1000 REAL fast and I would've liked more indications of the mood from showing. The writing was good but sometimes the tension could've been woven just a littttttle bit higher. So little nitpicks! (And lmao I'm a debut author so I know these feels and I know they get better with more books.) ANYWAY I'M A WRECK, HOW ARE YOU. This one is here to pack an emotional picnic and the actual pain of Evan's thoughts and experiences is absolutely well written. I justttttt want to kidnap him and give him a good life. It's not a pretty story and it is a needful story and my heart aches. (Signs of a good book: MY FEELS HURT.) Maybe I'm not so ugly after all. Maybe no one is really ugly, and maybe no one has the right to call someone that or tell them that they are. Maybe the only real ugliness is what lives inside some people.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Korrina (OwlCrate)

    I spent the entire afternoon reading this and it really broke my heart. This book is brutal and devastating. This book is definitely not for everyone, and you can see that by looking through some of the other reviews, but it spoke to me and made me feel deeply.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kai

    "Here's the deal about never being authentically loved by your parents: The most fucked-up gesture or morsel of compassion is like a warm blanket." I haven't made my mind up completely about this book. One the one hand, it is a truthful and painful novel that makes it hard for you to swallow. On the other hand, it feels like big chunks of characterisation and plot were missing. Let me try to elaborate: Evan grows up in a strict and religious household. His mother abuses him mentally and physically "Here's the deal about never being authentically loved by your parents: The most fucked-up gesture or morsel of compassion is like a warm blanket." I haven't made my mind up completely about this book. One the one hand, it is a truthful and painful novel that makes it hard for you to swallow. On the other hand, it feels like big chunks of characterisation and plot were missing. Let me try to elaborate: Evan grows up in a strict and religious household. His mother abuses him mentally and physically. She tells him he is ugly and worthless because he is gay. And those are the nice things that come out of her mouth. She beats him, throws objects at him and has done so ever since he was a little child. She says she does those things because she loves him. Evan's father is loving and dedicated to his family. He tries to protect Evan where he can but he still doesn't do enough. Here come the spoilers, so stop reading here if you do not want to know more: A relationship that I do not understand at all is Evan's and Jeremy's friendship. Throughout the book, Jeremy is a dick. What is worse, he becomes an outright bully and traitor. And now I don't get Evan's reaction and thought process about this break of trust, or rather the lack thereof. Jeremy is easily forgiven. This passiveness and apathy bother me about Evan. When he finds out that he told his whole school that he is gay and in love with his best friend - he had a blackout and can't remember this situation but later sees a video of it - he doesn't even give it much thought. Honestly, this would have made me break down and cry and hide for days on end. But Evan hardly gives it a second thought. You could argue that this shows how people react differently to certain situations, but to me, it felt like this and a few other scenes weren't given enough thought. What also bothers me is that Evan's vicious and violent mother doesn't suffer any consequences for all the harm she did him. I wondered where Evan's anger was about all the death threats and scars he had suffered from her. I wondered how Evan's best friend found out about this abuse but also lacked a reaction that was more forceful than a simple "You know I want to kill her, right?". Evan was so helpless and alone and what I wished for him - and for the teens that might read this book and relate to him - was a solution. In the end, Evan turned 18 and moved out. But why did no adult ever help him? Why did his best friend not even suggest going to the police? Why were no alternative solutions brought up? Anyway, I'm glad to add another Own Voices author to my list and want to celebrate that there are more and more queer authors out there who are given an opportunity to have their voices heard. And I'm intrigued to find out what else Angelo Surmelis might be writing in future. Find more of my books on Instagram

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sana

    This book was heartbreakingly sad and the authors note just broke me. It's about parental abuse, coming out and finding your voice in a harsh and judgmental world. Also this is a #ownvoices novel!!! However, I didn't like how Henry kept saying "I'll be the one to help you. I want to be the one you trust." Yikes. I really didn't feel their romance either?? There's a lot of consent issues. Henry kissed Ev without permission when he told Henry THAT HE WAS SCARED AND NOT SURE. Overall, it's an okay bo This book was heartbreakingly sad and the authors note just broke me. It's about parental abuse, coming out and finding your voice in a harsh and judgmental world. Also this is a #ownvoices novel!!! However, I didn't like how Henry kept saying "I'll be the one to help you. I want to be the one you trust." Yikes. I really didn't feel their romance either?? There's a lot of consent issues. Henry kissed Ev without permission when he told Henry THAT HE WAS SCARED AND NOT SURE. Overall, it's an okay book and I liked it minus the unhealthy romance. Also, those descriptions of the Greek food got me hungry, yum. 3.5 stars.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Vitor Martins

    Esse é um livro sobre abuso doméstico (psicológico e físico), que conta a história de um menino gay tendo que lidar com a constante rejeição de sua mãe. Sendo (infelizmente) um homem que passou por isso, desde a inadequação dentro de casa por causa dos conflitos religiosos até a agressão física, esse é um tópico que geralmente me deixa dividido. Porque, por mais que eu ache extremamente importante que a literatura YA aborde temas assim, eu sempre acabo sendo lembrado de situações que eu vivi que Esse é um livro sobre abuso doméstico (psicológico e físico), que conta a história de um menino gay tendo que lidar com a constante rejeição de sua mãe. Sendo (infelizmente) um homem que passou por isso, desde a inadequação dentro de casa por causa dos conflitos religiosos até a agressão física, esse é um tópico que geralmente me deixa dividido. Porque, por mais que eu ache extremamente importante que a literatura YA aborde temas assim, eu sempre acabo sendo lembrado de situações que eu vivi que achei que já tinha superado e, guess what?, não superei. Em The Dangerous Art of Blending In isso tudo foi elevado à maior das potências porque eu acho que nunca vi tanto da minha história em um protagonista como vi no Evan. Desde os pequenos questionamentos que ele tem no dia a dia até coisas extremamente específicas como a maneira como a mãe dele descobre sobre sua sexualidade por causa dos seus diários. O livro é angustiante, traz poucas cenas onde o leitor consegue respirar aliviado e despertou em mim uma raiva constante de todos que fizeram mal para o Evan. Mas essa é uma história sobre um sobrevivente. É a história de um garoto que odeia a própria vida mas ainda assim luta por ela. Independente dos motivos, Evan quer sobreviver e a maneira como o autor coloca esse desejo desesperador na escrita é muito bonita. Muitos dos temas abordados aqui conversam com parte do que eu estou escrevendo em Piratas Gays (título provisório do meu próximo livro) e eu encontrei aqui muita coragem para continuar contando essa história (porque não está sendo fácil tirar ela de dentro de mim), e a leitura de TDAOBI não poderia ter vindo em um momento melhor. Eu terminei a leitura me acabando de chorar mas era um choro bom. Um choro que me fez perceber tudo que eu passei para estar vivo hoje. Para olhar o ponto em que a minha vida chegou e acreditar que está tudo bem.

  7. 4 out of 5

    AMEERA

    Favorite book of 2018 ✨

  8. 5 out of 5

    Peter Monn

    Such a beautiful book. My full review will be up on my booktube channel at http://Youtube.com/peterlikesbooks

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marianna

    GREEK MAIN CHARACTER AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stacee

    I desperately wanted to love this book and I’m actually wondering if 3 stars is too high of a rating. First off: major trigger warnings for physical and mental abuse as well as homophobia. I couldn’t connect with Evan. He seems like a good guy in a shitty situation, but it felt like I never actually got to know him. I hated Evan’s mom and his dad isn’t any better as he just lets it happen. As much as I wanted to love the romance part of things, it was very dramatic and over the top. Plot wise, i I desperately wanted to love this book and I’m actually wondering if 3 stars is too high of a rating. First off: major trigger warnings for physical and mental abuse as well as homophobia. I couldn’t connect with Evan. He seems like a good guy in a shitty situation, but it felt like I never actually got to know him. I hated Evan’s mom and his dad isn’t any better as he just lets it happen. As much as I wanted to love the romance part of things, it was very dramatic and over the top. Plot wise, it was a rollercoaster of nothing. I was on edge because I was expecting a horrible beating every time I turned the page. It’s basically a slice of time where nothing happens except abuse. All sorts of people know Evan is getting abused and no one does anything. Literally no one helps. Lastly, I seriously struggled with the rhythm of the story. Everything was “I did this and then this and then this happened before I did this.” It got old reaaaaalllly quick. Overall, it had a lot of promise and judging by the high reviews, I’m in the minority. Obviously this book just wasn’t for me. **Huge thanks to Balzer + Bray for providing the arc free of charge**

  11. 5 out of 5

    Max Baker

    The Dangerous Art of Blending In is a new take on the standard "Gay in a small town" narrative, because it's not about coming out as gay, but coming out with the truth about an abusive parent. I use the phrase "at it's core" a lot in reviews, because I find that the core of the story needs to be strong enough to build a story around it. Soft/weak/boring cores lead to lackluster stories and I found The Dangerous Art of Blending In's core to be spectacular. However, I found the summery misleading The Dangerous Art of Blending In is a new take on the standard "Gay in a small town" narrative, because it's not about coming out as gay, but coming out with the truth about an abusive parent. I use the phrase "at it's core" a lot in reviews, because I find that the core of the story needs to be strong enough to build a story around it. Soft/weak/boring cores lead to lackluster stories and I found The Dangerous Art of Blending In's core to be spectacular. However, I found the summery misleading. It reads as a sort of traditional coming out story where a teen boy is just discovering his sexuality when instead, it is a novel about coming out in an abusive household. A lot of queer YA have homophobic parents to create tension and conflict, but in this novel Evan's mother is not just homophobic but extremely abusive both physically and mentally. And no, I'm not saying children of homophobic parents aren't abusive, I'm saying that Evan's mother hated him long before she knew he was gay and her homophobia does not lead to abuse, but rather the abuse leads to homophobia. I don't think I've ever read a book about an abusive mother and a meek father before, especially not where the abuse victim is a male. I appreciated tat Surmelis didn't make Evan's mother sympathetic or paint Evan's perspective of her as anything less then terrified. He legitimately feared his mother and she legitimately hated, hated her son. It was vile and disgusting to read about this character and what she did to her son almost to the point where I needed to stop reading and take a breather. But, that emotion, that hatred and fear Evan felt for his mother was some of the most real emotion I've ever felt reading a book before. The relationship between Evan and his mother is at the center of his story far more then Henry is. Sure, Henry helps Evan emotionally, but it's Evan who has to make choices and confront what has been done to him. The title, The Dangerous Art of Blending In, is perfect in the sense that that is the story, Evan's story. A warning to not let yourself blend in to avoid the bad things in the world. Evan tries so hard to keep his worlds sperate, to blend into the background and let his crush move on and his mother abuse him because it is the easy thing to do. It's easy to let things happen, but it's hard to change things. It's even harder to make change happen, to take the reigns and just do it. This book is about complicity, letting things happen when you know you can stop them and what happens when you choose to do nothing, to blend in. Nearly every character in this book blends in some way. Evan's father, his pastor, his friend Jeremy. They all let things happen and are forced to face the consequences of not doing anything and I appreciate how Surmelis tackled their actions and the subsequent fallout. Evan lives in such a fragile state, constantly volleying between blending in to two different worlds that he can't actively process them together. A good example of this is in the ice cream parlor where Evan meets up with the boy he kissed at Bible Camp. It's a hectic scene, where Henry asks Evan questions while Gaige tries to take Evan's attention away from Henry. And the way it's written is so interesting, because Evan almost never directly acknowledges either of them together. He gives his attention to Henry and ignores Gaige, only to turn his attention to Gaige and ignore Henry. He treats them like they cannot see each other because that is the only way he can talk to them. His life is so structured he couldn't fathom collapsing the walls he's built around the worlds he's made. The Dangerous Art of Blending In is a dark, dark book about abuse and complicity that's not for everyone, but should be read by everyone who ever just thought to blend in, do nothing, and hope it would all work out.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sylwia (Wish Fulfillment)

    Entertainment rating: 5 Reader health rating: 2 Settling for a 3.5 overall? Content warnings: verbal, mental/emotional, and physical child abuse; on-the-page violent child abuse, homophobia, bullying, assault Disclaimers: I'm a therapist and I work in child welfare, therefore child abuse is a topic I think about 8 hours a day, 5 days a week. I felt very angry while reading this because of the reviews I read from other reviewers. The abusive mother is this novel does not have a mental health diagnosis Entertainment rating: 5 Reader health rating: 2 Settling for a 3.5 overall? Content warnings: verbal, mental/emotional, and physical child abuse; on-the-page violent child abuse, homophobia, bullying, assault Disclaimers: I'm a therapist and I work in child welfare, therefore child abuse is a topic I think about 8 hours a day, 5 days a week. I felt very angry while reading this because of the reviews I read from other reviewers. The abusive mother is this novel does not have a mental health diagnosis. Blaming mental illness for child abuse is denial and ignorance. People choose to abuse others. Abuse is not something that your brain chemistry forces you to perform. Can some individuals diagnosed with a mental health disorder also be abusive? Sure. But those parts of them are unrelated. We could argue about personality disorders, but then we'd just be getting technical and we would not focusing on what really matters here: not perpetuating abusive behavior. Why I Recommend Bumping This DOWN On Your TBR: Is this kind of reading experience necessary? Is it okay for us to be reading to be entertained by a story of someone being abused? Was this informative enough to excuse using abuse as a plot device? I don't think that this was informative enough. I don't think that this would help an abused child feel validated or know how to reach out for help. This is more of a memoir-turned-into-fiction. I also don't think this should be marketed towards young adults, if only because I don't feel like it would benefit a young reader. Why You Might Bump This Up On Your TBR: I should mention that the protagonist is gay and in love and that I enjoyed the writing style very much and couldn't put this work down. This is a believable portrayal of what it's like to grow up being physically abused. It was so believable that it was angering to watch all of the other people observing Evan from the sidelines and not doing anything to help him, including his father and pastor. I appreciated that the author included hotlines and resources at the end. The way that the author slowly moved the story forward kept me in a mental and emotional anguish, and I give the author credit for creating that experience for the reader. While I appreciate that this topic was covered, I don't envision this opening the eyes of a reader who has never learned about child abuse before, and that's what I would have wanted it to do.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tracey (Life and Literature)

    Books like this hit me right in the heart, because the stuff that happens in this book happens every day in real life. It might be happening in your own home, or your neighbours home, or your best friends home. Somewhere, someone right at this minute is struggling with their identity, or their sexuality, or acceptance from those who are supposed to love and protect them. The Dangerous Art of Blending In dealt with such a wide range of topics. All of them intertwined and impacted on the other. Bu Books like this hit me right in the heart, because the stuff that happens in this book happens every day in real life. It might be happening in your own home, or your neighbours home, or your best friends home. Somewhere, someone right at this minute is struggling with their identity, or their sexuality, or acceptance from those who are supposed to love and protect them. The Dangerous Art of Blending In dealt with such a wide range of topics. All of them intertwined and impacted on the other. But I think this was the first time though that I had read a book that dealt with abuse from a mother. And I found that so hard to read. Your mother is supposed to love you, care for you, protect you. But Evan's mother does none of those things. She is physically abusive and verbally abusive. She is downright horrid! While she puts on a good show to outsiders, and portrays herself as the loving doting mother, behind closed doors things are very different. Not only was Evan dealing with the abuse of his mother, but also the lack of help from the adults who knew what was happening. How could you turn a blind eye to that? How could you not do everything in your power to offer protection and stop the abuse? My heart broke for him. While this book dealt with some really tough subject matters, there was also some really great things as well. Henry and his family were the shining light in this book, and I was so happy that Evan had them. They're loving and supportive, and everything that Evan's family isn't. When you get to the end of this book I highly recommend reading the author's note. It really packs a punch and adds a whole other layer to the story. You'll look at everything you've just finished reading in a whole new light. Thanks so much to the publisher for sending a copy my way for an honest review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    A stunning debut! Just to get out of the way: This is not your "happy queer" book. Trigger warnings include child abuse (emotional & physical), homophobia & I'm including my own TW for complacency. Evan's father is aware of what's going on, but sadly, in like many cases of abuse, does nothing to stop it, & IMO actually causes it to escalate. THE DANGEROUS ART OF BLENDING IN was extremely difficult to read. I have a childhood background somewhat similar to Evan's & I've had my fair A stunning debut! Just to get out of the way: This is not your "happy queer" book. Trigger warnings include child abuse (emotional & physical), homophobia & I'm including my own TW for complacency. Evan's father is aware of what's going on, but sadly, in like many cases of abuse, does nothing to stop it, & IMO actually causes it to escalate. THE DANGEROUS ART OF BLENDING IN was extremely difficult to read. I have a childhood background somewhat similar to Evan's & I've had my fair share of books dealing with these themes. It doesn't get any easier. But for some reason, this was sharper; the text more vibrant in my eyes. Over the years I've been able to distance myself enough to not get so easily affected by these types of novels (otherwise I wouldn't be reading them), but Evan's voice & perspective broke through that shell. The introspection & characterization of him in terms of his family life [specifically] makes for a powerful MC & one I'm sure many readers will find pieces of themselves in. It's true that there's not much going on here except for Evan's home life with a subplot of a romance between him & his best friend, Henry. Here's where it gets tricky. Henry is a pure example of a manipulator & this is a pure example of a toxic friendship that turns into a bad romance. Henry takes advantage of Evan, claiming that he is the one who wants to "save him", gets jealous of others who take Evan's attention, demands to put Evan in uncomfortable situations even after his feelings are clear, while of course claiming he loves him. Evan blurs the lines between intimacy & attachment; he has never been loved by anyone before, so when Henry says it to him he naturally believes it. The dynamic between these two is absolutely not okay & I wish it was expounded on because it breaks my heart thinking how many young readers are going to read this book, see the interactions & conclude that this is the only way someone will want you (especially those in Evan's position). Henry is never called out on his behavior & I'll admit, he plays the role so well I probably would have fallen for him, too. (It's here that the advantages of being older than the target audience & still recovering from my own toxic friendships come into play.) I won't go so far to say that it's irresponsible to do this as it coincides with the narrative, but the fact that this is never challenged really rubbed me the wrong way. Another thing that bothered me was Evan's mother is never corrected on her behavior either. She is given the easy way out & there is no solution. Thinking back to my child/tween years, I vividly recall tearing through my teacher's book bins, desperate to find a book with characters that were going through what I was. ("You have to tell a trusted adult", was all I would hear. But what about after? What about the whole process? Would my other family members be okay? Would I be okay? I wanted to be prepared & I wanted to hear firsthand from someone who actually went through -lived through- this shit.) Unfortunately I found no such book. Perhaps there are ones out there, but it wasn't available to me when I needed it the most. The agony of this makes me think long & hard about whether or not I'd recommend it. For most, it's not easy to just get out because 18 is still eons away. To have a novel this hard-hitting, I wish there would have been another option. I also think because the interactions with his mother are detailed & can be extremely upsetting, I'd be leery to give this to a teen who is currently going through this ordeal. It would be more effective in the aftermath period. On the other hand, I know there aren't enough books that will help these individuals, & it's quite possible this could be the catalyst to change someone's life, so my final advice would be to give with caution. This book is emotionally draining; you can tell that it's raw & was painful to write. This is an #ownvoices novel & I want to commend the author for sharing his story. Although I had major problems with the items mentioned above, I am still giving this 4 stars because the prose is compelling & the internal thoughts of Evan's guilt & attempting to compartmentalize his life is worth the price of admission alone. I am excited to see what else Surmelis has in store. *And if you do decide to give this a try, please stay safe. You are loved, no matter how much anyone tries to make you believe different.*

  15. 5 out of 5

    destiny ♎ [howling libraries]

    DNF I really wanted to like this book! It's own-voices, and I'm here for all of the queer contemporaries. Unfortunately, though, I couldn't mesh with the narrative voice at all. The writing feels disjointed and in need of serious refining, and Evan is just not an enjoyable character to look through the perspective of. It's not that he's a bad kid - it's just the writing. I'm also really not fond of the romantic subplot of the book, and when I was told by friends that it only got stronger througho DNF I really wanted to like this book! It's own-voices, and I'm here for all of the queer contemporaries. Unfortunately, though, I couldn't mesh with the narrative voice at all. The writing feels disjointed and in need of serious refining, and Evan is just not an enjoyable character to look through the perspective of. It's not that he's a bad kid - it's just the writing. I'm also really not fond of the romantic subplot of the book, and when I was told by friends that it only got stronger throughout the story, I decided to let it go. I won't try to discourage anyone else from picking it up, and I'd be willing to try the author's future works, but this wasn't for me. Thank you to Balzer + Bray for providing me with an ARC in exchange for my honest review!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kayleigh

    1 star. “I've squeezed as many bookcases in this tiny space as possible. Being surrounded by books and magazines makes me feel calm. It makes the room seem wrapped in a layer of protection. As if nothing or no one can get to me.” I wanted to like The Dangerous Art of Blending In. I really did. But, unfortunately, it's one of the worst books I've read in a long time. The writing was fine, that wasn't the problem. My problem was with Evan and Henry, both as individual characters, and their relations 1 star. “I've squeezed as many bookcases in this tiny space as possible. Being surrounded by books and magazines makes me feel calm. It makes the room seem wrapped in a layer of protection. As if nothing or no one can get to me.” I wanted to like The Dangerous Art of Blending In. I really did. But, unfortunately, it's one of the worst books I've read in a long time. The writing was fine, that wasn't the problem. My problem was with Evan and Henry, both as individual characters, and their relationship. The way Angelo Surmelis portrayed these two characters together was incredibly concerning and disrespectful. I don't think I'll go into a full review like I normally would, because a lot of what I'd want to point out has been said before by other reviewers. The main thing I want to point out is this: Evan is abused and severely depressed. His whole recovery arc is taken over by Henry attempting to "cure" him, to be the one that fixes everything. Which, let me point out, is not healthy. If that even needs to be said. Henry is not a psychologist, he's not trained for this, and to be quite honest, all he does is add on to Evan's abuse and problems. Henry often puts his own feelings above Evan's, and even guilts Evan into having a relationship with him. Their entire relationship is built around manipulation and abuse, and it's painted as normal and healthy. On another note, Henry couldn't give less of a shit if Evan consents to ANYTHING. There are specific points in the book where Evan tells Henry no, that he's scared and doesn't want to, and Henry doesn't care. It's about what Henry wants, when he wants it, and it doesn't matter what Evan wants. Despite the fact that Surmelis lets the readers know that Evan is enjoying it, Henry has no clue. Before their first kiss, all Henry hears is that Evan's scared. He really couldn't care less, and kisses him anyway. There's many scenes in this book where Henry puts his own wants and needs above Evan's, and does as he pleases without any clear consent. All in all, I'm exhausted. This book was exhausting. I'm tired of abuse and dubious consent being the new normal, and I'm tired of authors getting away with creating these kind of relationships and stories without any repercussions. It's not okay.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Robinson-Hatch

    I really wanted to love this book. I really did. I mean, it was OKAY, but I was expecting something far more powerful and moving. I think the main thing that made it hard for me to love this book was just how confronting it was. I understand that it's necessary to read confronting books sometimes, but the homophobia and abuse was really difficult to read. I'd definitely recommend keeping clear of this book if those are things you're triggered by. Also, I found it hard to connect to the protagonis I really wanted to love this book. I really did. I mean, it was OKAY, but I was expecting something far more powerful and moving. I think the main thing that made it hard for me to love this book was just how confronting it was. I understand that it's necessary to read confronting books sometimes, but the homophobia and abuse was really difficult to read. I'd definitely recommend keeping clear of this book if those are things you're triggered by. Also, I found it hard to connect to the protagonist because of how much of the story was focussed on the abuse. I was scared that there was going to be another confronting scene just around the corner, so this was definitely more of a tentative read for me, despite wanting to know if things would work out okay for Evan in the end. I wanted him to be happy, I really did. His whole situation was just so tragic - definitely not the happy queer book I had hoped for. Now I am a sad queer.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Flores

    Pretty excited to get to post one of the first reviews for this wonderful book! Angelo has written something that is so impactful, heartbreaking and needed in our world (and on YA bookshelves). I cannot recommend this book more highly. It is so damn good.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Patty

    I have never felt bad about DNFing a book until now -_- TW: All abuse - Emotional, Verbal, Physical, Mental. Bullying. The Dangerous Art of Blending In was a book I was really looking forward to reading when HCC Frenzy brought it to my attention. Especially since it's an #ownvoice book. But I've been struggling with this book for weeks and I'm normally a quick reader. I feel so bad having to DNF this book because I feel like it's an important story. I won't be giving this a star rating as I haven I have never felt bad about DNFing a book until now -_- TW: All abuse - Emotional, Verbal, Physical, Mental. Bullying. The Dangerous Art of Blending In was a book I was really looking forward to reading when HCC Frenzy brought it to my attention. Especially since it's an #ownvoice book. But I've been struggling with this book for weeks and I'm normally a quick reader. I feel so bad having to DNF this book because I feel like it's an important story. I won't be giving this a star rating as I haven't finished it and I don't know if I'll ever pick it back up. This book was really difficult for me to read, I normally don't have a problem reading books with tough topics but this one was just way to much for me. I also found myself not being able to stay motivated to continuing reading, the writing style wasn't bad but seemed jumbled at times. Yet, there were other moments that the writing style was just too real and I had to put the book down. I know I said that I wasn't sure if I'd pick this book back up but the more I write this mini review out the more I want to give this a second chance. By no means is this book bad / horrible. It was just too much for me emotionally, especially since I know this is something so many people actually go through and it breaks my heart knowing that. I do recommend this book but please make sure you know what you're getting yourself into. **Thank You HarperCollins CA / HCC Frenzy for providing me with an ARC in exchange for my honest review**

  20. 4 out of 5

    Maria (Big City Bookworm)

    Actual rating: 4.5 Stars! -- Man oh man. This was a hard one to read. It should be said that there are definitely trigger warnings for physical, emotional and verbal abuse found within this novel. The story was a beautiful one and it was an important story that needed to be told, but it was very difficult to get through. Stay tuned for a review coming soon!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jay G

    Want to see more bookish things from me? Check out my Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfer... *I was sent a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review* TW: abuse of all kinds, homophobia 17 year old Evan is the son of very strict Greek immigrants. His father would rather stay quiet then cause conflict between Evan and his mother. He is feeling very lonely, the only solace Evan can find is going to an old abandoned monastery. During the summer, Evan is Want to see more bookish things from me? Check out my Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfer... *I was sent a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review* TW: abuse of all kinds, homophobia 17 year old Evan is the son of very strict Greek immigrants. His father would rather stay quiet then cause conflict between Evan and his mother. He is feeling very lonely, the only solace Evan can find is going to an old abandoned monastery. During the summer, Evan is sent to bible camp and upon returns, realizes his best friend, Henry, has become increasingly more attractive and is showing signs that he may want to be more than friends. I wanted to like this book more than I did. Knowing that the book was loosely based off of the author's life made it even more heartbreaking. It was painful to read about Evan's mother physically, mentally and verbally abusing him with no one helping him. Evan was a very sweet character, but I wasn't able to connect with him as much as I would have liked to. I felt that the book was so focused on the abuse aspect of the story, it was very hard to get to know Evan as a person. The only major problem with the book is that the romance aspect seemed to be portrayed as a cure for abuse, which I personally do not agree with. As this was an own-voice novel, I tried not to let this affect my overall opinion of the book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amber (Books of Amber)

    The Dangerous Art of Blending In is a really tough book for me to review because it is about such a dark subject matter and also, without going into too much detail, it hit very close to home and it was triggering. I had to keep putting the book down because Surmelis' wrote certain scenes so well that I had to step out of the story for a bit. The main character, Evan, is Greek-American, gay, in the closet, and is being raised in an abusive household. I loved Evan sooo much. He is the sweetest per The Dangerous Art of Blending In is a really tough book for me to review because it is about such a dark subject matter and also, without going into too much detail, it hit very close to home and it was triggering. I had to keep putting the book down because Surmelis' wrote certain scenes so well that I had to step out of the story for a bit. The main character, Evan, is Greek-American, gay, in the closet, and is being raised in an abusive household. I loved Evan sooo much. He is the sweetest person and he deserves all the hugs. Evan's mother is actually the worst. I don't know how else to express my hatred of her in a PG manner. She was physically, mentally, emotionally, and verbally abusive, and it was incredibly difficult to read. Evan tried so hard to live up to his mother's expectations and to do everything "right", but she didn't change. Because people like her don't change. And Evan eventually came to realise that he wasn't the problem here. Evan's father wasn't much better, as he just sat back and allowed this abuse to happen, only stepping in when Evan's life was actually in danger. It was incredibly difficult to read. I wasn't too bothered about Henry, the best friend and love interest, because the romance took a backseat to the rest, but he was cute, I guess. I liked his relationship with Evan well enough, but like I said, it was overshadowed by the abuse and the story was really about Evan. The Dangerous Art of Blending In was one of my best reads of 2017. Everyone should read it when it comes out in January.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    I wanted this to be My Book. The one that I can't wait to get into the hands of kids who need to see something different and need to see themselves. This is that book. It's a tough one - it's HARD and there's no easy answer found at the end but it is true. Evan is like so many kids and yet he's singular. The trials he goes through are not simple and not everything gets solved. His story in a lot of ways begins at the end for him. Very very good.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gabby

    4.5 stars! Thanks to Harper Collins for sending me a copy of the book for review. I want to start off by saying that this was a really hard and confronting story to read about some really dark subject matters. If you find these topics triggering (abuse and homophobia), then just be aware of that. However, I really enjoyed the read. Evan was a great character to tell this story; he's going through an extremely tough time at home and within himself. His mother abuses him, and his father stands by an 4.5 stars! Thanks to Harper Collins for sending me a copy of the book for review. I want to start off by saying that this was a really hard and confronting story to read about some really dark subject matters. If you find these topics triggering (abuse and homophobia), then just be aware of that. However, I really enjoyed the read. Evan was a great character to tell this story; he's going through an extremely tough time at home and within himself. His mother abuses him, and his father stands by and doesn't say a word, and this created probably the main conflict of the story. I loved that the author never sugar coated Evan's mother, or made light on her actions. She treats her son horribly, and he fears her for that. I felt Evan's emotions throughout the story; it was so real and raw that I couldn't not feel the emotion myself. I read the author's note at the back of the book, and this is an Own Voices novel, which just made the story that much more real and authentic. Even the title is real as it visualises the repercussions of blending in. Evan realises this, along with other characters such as his father, the pastor, and his friends. Henry, Evan's best friend and later love interest, took more of a minor plot line in the story. It was cute, and I liked the little scenes that they had together, but it was definitely overshadowed by the story line of Evan's mother. Like I said, 'The Dangerous Art of Blending in' is definitely a difficult book to get through because of the dark topics, but I think it's also a really important read. It's tragic and painful, yet there's a lot of hope in the end.

  25. 4 out of 5

    chitxwrites

    So I won a signed copy of this book from the author, himself. This story revolves around a character called Evan and it takes you on a journey with him.This book filters you with grief, happiness, joy and tears. I am happy that i read this book, this amazing book. This book highlights the main and most important aspects in our society and in our life. This heart warming story will always have a special spot in the back of my mind and in my heart. You'll fall in love with this book and its charac So I won a signed copy of this book from the author, himself. This story revolves around a character called Evan and it takes you on a journey with him.This book filters you with grief, happiness, joy and tears. I am happy that i read this book, this amazing book. This book highlights the main and most important aspects in our society and in our life. This heart warming story will always have a special spot in the back of my mind and in my heart. You'll fall in love with this book and its characters. I'm happy that I got the opportunity to read this book. This is now among my many favorites. I'll rate it 5/5. I'll highly recommend this book to all the fans of YA and Contemporary novels. You'll certainly fall in love with this one too.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This book was so amazing. There were a lot of parts that were difficult to read and I had a lot of emotions about many of the characters that did (or did not do) certain things. I loved Evan. I loved his perseverance and his strength and I just wanted to protect him from everything that was happening to him. I'm so upset that I was so disappointed with some of the actions of some side characters. Although some may struggle with the content in this story, it is still an amazing story and it's insp This book was so amazing. There were a lot of parts that were difficult to read and I had a lot of emotions about many of the characters that did (or did not do) certain things. I loved Evan. I loved his perseverance and his strength and I just wanted to protect him from everything that was happening to him. I'm so upset that I was so disappointed with some of the actions of some side characters. Although some may struggle with the content in this story, it is still an amazing story and it's inspiring to see Evan (and others) eventually take hold of their situations and stand up for themselves.

  27. 5 out of 5

    BookishBugg

    First if all trigger warning for mental and physical abuse. The story is about this boy who belongs to a greek Christian family, who has been physically and mentally abused by his mother for being homosexual. Therefore it is story of self discovery and finding one's own voice through all the hardships of life. To be very honest the story is so sad and so beautiful at the same time. It has made me feel both happiness and rage. Some of the parts were so romantic that i couldn't stop blushing. The First if all trigger warning for mental and physical abuse. The story is about this boy who belongs to a greek Christian family, who has been physically and mentally abused by his mother for being homosexual. Therefore it is story of self discovery and finding one's own voice through all the hardships of life. To be very honest the story is so sad and so beautiful at the same time. It has made me feel both happiness and rage. Some of the parts were so romantic that i couldn't stop blushing. The writing is beautiful and the characters are well build up and very realistic. Therefore it was a perfect read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lilly (Lair Of Books)

    This will be the toughest yet most important review I write on my blog...will need to sleep on it for now

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Craswell

    Before I get into talking about my thoughts on this book I would just like to give a HUGE content warning for child abuse and violent homophobia in this book. This is a very emotionally intense book, this is a difficult book to read at times, but I think it does a really good job of exploring what it’s like to be in the situation that Evan is in. He’s from a very religious Greek family and his mother is so concerned that he has some kind of evil inside him, that he’s going to be gay, that she is Before I get into talking about my thoughts on this book I would just like to give a HUGE content warning for child abuse and violent homophobia in this book. This is a very emotionally intense book, this is a difficult book to read at times, but I think it does a really good job of exploring what it’s like to be in the situation that Evan is in. He’s from a very religious Greek family and his mother is so concerned that he has some kind of evil inside him, that he’s going to be gay, that she is abusive; and all while dealing with his difficult home life he’s figuring out who he is and how he identifies and how he feels about his best friend. The author says in an authors note at the end of the book that he was writing his from his own experience. I think having these stories showing these experiences and helping people going through similar experiences is so important. (I’m about to talk about the tone in relation to the ending, just a warning if you’re super careful about spoilers but I think it’s important enough that it needs to be talked about, I’ll be vague). I think one of the best things about this book is that it isn’t a tragedy. Yes it tackles some really difficult, heavy subjects but the moments of light and happiness in this book shine so bright and showing that abuse survivors can have their happy endings is, in my opinion, one of this books best attributes. I’ve read far too many tragic stories of queer people being hurt and abused and killed, I’m so very glad we’re starting to see more and more books that refuse to bury their gays.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lu

    - own voices!! - LGBTQ!! - there was a LOT of homophobia in the book that the MC had to deal with and it was heartbreaking. I was sobbing throughout the end, when it got so so much worse. - parental abuse rep!! -- SO HEARTBREAKING. I CANNOT DEAL WITH THIS BOOK. - about finding your own voice + accepting who you are!! - romance was cute!! I liked the LGBTQ rep. Henry wanted to help him, BUT it wasn’t like,,, IM GOING TO SAVE YOU FROM ALL YOUR PROBLEMS. He didn’t try and solve everything for Evan, - own voices!! - LGBTQ!! - there was a LOT of homophobia in the book that the MC had to deal with and it was heartbreaking. I was sobbing throughout the end, when it got so so much worse. - parental abuse rep!! -- SO HEARTBREAKING. I CANNOT DEAL WITH THIS BOOK. - about finding your own voice + accepting who you are!! - romance was cute!! I liked the LGBTQ rep. Henry wanted to help him, BUT it wasn’t like,,, IM GOING TO SAVE YOU FROM ALL YOUR PROBLEMS. He didn’t try and solve everything for Evan, he knew whatever he did would make it WORSE and he was just THERE FOR HIM. - EVAN WAS CUTE OK. Like,,, he had 0% self worth and ALL BECAUSE OF HIS MOTHER. She was AWFUL. The parental abuse makes this book SO heartbreaking and emotional and I was horrified the entire way through. - IT WAS SLOW. BUT I COULDN’T PUT IT DOWN OK. I read it in a few HOURS. So,,, ITS GOOD. -MINI QUIBBLES: Felt that the mc was rather childish sometimes when dealing w/ relationship stuff, but it was only minor. Also, there was nothing said about what happened to his abusive mother, and I feel like there should have been something?? I just feel like that was a little unfinished?? I JUST WANTED TO KNOW WHAG HAPPENED ALL IN ALL: this. Book. Tore. My. Heart. Out.

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