kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

My Sister, the Serial Killer

Availability: Ready to download

Satire meets slasher in this short, darkly funny hand grenade of a novel about a Nigerian woman whose younger sister has a very inconvenient habit of killing her boyfriends. "Femi makes three, you know. Three and they label you a serial killer." Korede is bitter. How could she not be? Her sister, Ayoola, is many things: the favorite child, the beautiful one, possibly sociopa Satire meets slasher in this short, darkly funny hand grenade of a novel about a Nigerian woman whose younger sister has a very inconvenient habit of killing her boyfriends. "Femi makes three, you know. Three and they label you a serial killer." Korede is bitter. How could she not be? Her sister, Ayoola, is many things: the favorite child, the beautiful one, possibly sociopathic. And now Ayoola's third boyfriend in a row is dead. Korede's practicality is the sisters' saving grace. She knows the best solutions for cleaning blood, the trunk of her car is big enough for a body, and she keeps Ayoola from posting pictures of her dinner to Instagram when she should be mourning her "missing" boyfriend. Not that she gets any credit. A kind, handsome doctor at the hospital where Korede works, is the bright spot in her life. She dreams of the day when he will realize they're perfect for each other. But one day Ayoola shows up to the hospital uninvited and he takes notice. When he asks Korede for Ayoola's phone number, she must reckon with what her sister has become and what she will do about it. Sharp as nails and full of deadpan wit, Oyinkan Braithwaite has written a deliciously deadly debut that's as fun as it is frightening.


Compare
kode adsense disini

Satire meets slasher in this short, darkly funny hand grenade of a novel about a Nigerian woman whose younger sister has a very inconvenient habit of killing her boyfriends. "Femi makes three, you know. Three and they label you a serial killer." Korede is bitter. How could she not be? Her sister, Ayoola, is many things: the favorite child, the beautiful one, possibly sociopa Satire meets slasher in this short, darkly funny hand grenade of a novel about a Nigerian woman whose younger sister has a very inconvenient habit of killing her boyfriends. "Femi makes three, you know. Three and they label you a serial killer." Korede is bitter. How could she not be? Her sister, Ayoola, is many things: the favorite child, the beautiful one, possibly sociopathic. And now Ayoola's third boyfriend in a row is dead. Korede's practicality is the sisters' saving grace. She knows the best solutions for cleaning blood, the trunk of her car is big enough for a body, and she keeps Ayoola from posting pictures of her dinner to Instagram when she should be mourning her "missing" boyfriend. Not that she gets any credit. A kind, handsome doctor at the hospital where Korede works, is the bright spot in her life. She dreams of the day when he will realize they're perfect for each other. But one day Ayoola shows up to the hospital uninvited and he takes notice. When he asks Korede for Ayoola's phone number, she must reckon with what her sister has become and what she will do about it. Sharp as nails and full of deadpan wit, Oyinkan Braithwaite has written a deliciously deadly debut that's as fun as it is frightening.

30 review for My Sister, the Serial Killer

  1. 4 out of 5

    Roxane

    Clever novel about two sisters, one of whom is a serial killer, the other the resentful, yearning enabler. The satirical bent works really well here because it walks that fine line of being, given the contretemps, entirely plausible. Interesting observations about social media, men and what they want, and women who see right through them. Well worth a read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Larry H

    "I can't pinpoint the exact moment I realized that Ayoola was beautiful and I was...not. But what I do know is that I was aware of my own inadequacies long before." Korede is a nurse in Nigeria, dedicated to her patients and well-respected by her superiors. But no matter what her achievements are, she knows she'll always play second fiddle to her younger sister, Ayoola. Ayoola is the pretty one, the favorite—and she's a psychotic murderer. One night Ayoola summons Korede to her boyfriend's house. "I can't pinpoint the exact moment I realized that Ayoola was beautiful and I was...not. But what I do know is that I was aware of my own inadequacies long before." Korede is a nurse in Nigeria, dedicated to her patients and well-respected by her superiors. But no matter what her achievements are, she knows she'll always play second fiddle to her younger sister, Ayoola. Ayoola is the pretty one, the favorite—and she's a psychotic murderer. One night Ayoola summons Korede to her boyfriend's house. Ayoola says he attacked her and in self-defense, she stabbed him. It doesn't matter what the facts really are—who would disbelieve Ayoola? Korede is the sensible one, the calm one, the logical one who takes charge of the situation. She knows how to clean up the blood so no traces are found. She knows how to get rid of the body. It seems she has had a great deal of practice with this sort of thing, since this is the third boyfriend Ayoola has killed. "Femi makes three, you know. Three and they label you a serial killer." Ayoola isn't the slightest bit remorseful about what happened. She's ready to move on, find another man to charm. Korede thinks she should lie low for a while, even though she knows it won't be long before Ayoola bats her eyes and more men will come running. But this time Ayoola sets her sights a bit closer to home, as she alights on Tade, a handsome, kind doctor Korede works with. He's also the doctor that Korede has been secretly in love with, but she knows she's no match for Ayoola's charms. As Korede watches Ayoola ensnare Tade, she feels powerless and frustrated. What she wants more than anything is just to reveal her sister's nefarious side, but she knows Ayoola will turn the evidence against her. She wishes she could just escape this life, but she has an obligation to protect her sister. With no one to turn to, she vents her anger and fears to the only person who will listen—a patient who has been in a comatose state for years. But she knows all too well what will happen if she doesn't stop it. "I am the older sister—I am responsible for Ayoola. That's how it has always been. Ayoola would break a glass, and I would receive the blame for giving her the drink. Ayoola would fail a class, and I would be blamed for not coaching her. Ayoola would take an apple and leave the store without paying for it, and I would be blamed for letting her get hungry." My Sister, the Serial Killer is a darkly funny yet disturbing story of familial obligation. It packs a powerful punch for a book that is less than 300 pages long, and that is because Oyinkan Braithwaite has created two complex, fascinating, not necessarily likable characters. You get glimpses of family history in order to understand where Ayoola developed her murderous tendencies. You both feel for Korede and want to shake her for allowing herself to be so fully manipulated. More than that, however, you'll want to know how this book ends. I had lots of suspicions and wasn't disappointed where Braithwaite took her story. It's certainly a troubling book about a woman so fully overshadowed by her sister that she's forced down a path she never would have taken, but it's also commentary on how unfairly women are compared to one another, with the most attractive one almost always winning out. I really enjoyed this, and read the entire book in a day. It certainly is a bit farcical, yet at the same time, you could believe this actually might happen, particularly in a society that treats women as second-class citizens. Braithwaite's storytelling was dead-on (no pun intended), and I look forward to seeing what comes next for her career. See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com, or check out my list of the best books I read in 2017 at https://itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com/2018/01/the-best-books-i-read-in-2017.html.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Navidad Thelamour

    Femi makes three, you know. Three, and they label you a serial killer. In case you haven't noticed, Oyinkan Braithwaite’s My Sister, the Serial Killer has been taking the social media scene by storm the past few weeks. And I get it; the cover art is (pardon my pun) killer and the title exudes a certain titillation that will make a reader quickly reach for the book on the shelf. For me, My Sister, the Serial Killer, was an easy, brisk read that I mostly read in one sitting. And I was additionally Femi makes three, you know. Three, and they label you a serial killer. In case you haven't noticed, Oyinkan Braithwaite’s My Sister, the Serial Killer has been taking the social media scene by storm the past few weeks. And I get it; the cover art is (pardon my pun) killer and the title exudes a certain titillation that will make a reader quickly reach for the book on the shelf. For me, My Sister, the Serial Killer, was an easy, brisk read that I mostly read in one sitting. And I was additionally excited to read it when I realized that the author and I graduated from the same university in England and likely had the same creative writing instructors! The short chapters (some only a few sentences long) created the effect of breezing through the novel at record speed, which is a plus, but it also created a few issues for this narrative. Oyinkan Braithwaite’s debut novel follows sisters Ayoola and Korede – Ayoola kills ‘em and Korede cleans ‘em up. But this isn’t just a novel about the boyfriends falling like flies; it’s a novel about the trials and bonds of sisterhood, an exploration of childhood abuse and a would-be love story all wrapped up tightly in the culture of Lagos, Nigeria. Now, that’s a lot to try to cram into 240 (not even full) pages, but it can be done; I’ve even seen it done well. Here, I wasn’t mind-blowingly impressed by the execution (again, couldn’t resist!) of My Sister, the Serial Killer. If you’re a reader who puts a lot of weight on pace, you might find that you’re in for a rather jerky ride with this novel. It flowed neither at a lyrically smooth pace nor at a heart-pounding thriller pace. It just sort of jerked from scene to scene with very little, if any, narrative connective tissue to sew the chapters seamlessly together. In short, while it a had a great plot and an ending that did manage to surprise me, it was not written with a lot of finesse. It read, to me, like a very first draft, not quite filled in enough to give us readers an entire picture. It was like a well-done sketch of artistry that hasn’t yet been filled in with color, like the structure of a building that has not yet been painted and offered windows and balconies. Now, ONWARD to the pros that you’ll find within these pages, because there are several of those. For one, it was a plus that this novel read so fast. While the plotting was jerky, the pace was quick, and that pulls you in to the story fast as you realize that you’re already so deep into it with so little time spent on it. And one of the real gems of My Sister was how Braithwaite interlaced the heart-pounding narrative of the killings themselves with the humor of said serial killer’s indifference and feigned naiveté: There is music blasting from Ayoola’s room. She is listening to Whitney Houston’s “I Wanna Dance with Somebody.” It would be more appropriate to play Brymo or Lourde, something solemn or yearning, rather than the musical equivalent of a pack of M&Ms. This novel is fully current, with narrative tools and chapter titles like “Instagram.” Ayoola is addicted to SnapChat and Instagram, often being scolded by Korede for posting frivolous updates for her followers when she’s supposed to be mourning her missing boyfriend, whom she herself has killed. Ayoola has forgotten, just that quickly about the fallen men and goes on with her life in a way that baffles her sister – enter The Comedy. So, while I wished that My Sister, the Serial Killer was better built out as a narrative, there is merit to it as a quick, amusing little read. It all comes down to what you’re looking for on your TBR. If you’re interested in a narrative set in Nigeria, this may be a great pick for you. If you’re looking for lightness and humor, a read you can breeze through easily that still offers some suspense, then you’ve absolutely come to the right place. But, if you’re more in the market for a side of intellectual stimulation with your killer thriller, then you may want to side step this one; you want find a lot of that here. 3 stars. *** I received an advance-read copy of this book from the publisher, Doubleday, via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. FOLLOW ME AT: The Navi Review Blog | Twitter | Instagram

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This book is a complete gem and I enjoyed every moment I spent with Korede and Ayoola! Firstly, I have never read a book that took place in Africa...Lagos Nigeria to be precise and it made this book much more interesting for me. Korede and Ayoola are sisters. Korede is the sensible one that makes her living as a nurse and also cleaning up after her sister Ayoola. Ayoola is flighty, addicted to social media, but mostly Ayoola is beautiful. No man can seem to resist her charm. Or, better yet, her This book is a complete gem and I enjoyed every moment I spent with Korede and Ayoola! Firstly, I have never read a book that took place in Africa...Lagos Nigeria to be precise and it made this book much more interesting for me. Korede and Ayoola are sisters. Korede is the sensible one that makes her living as a nurse and also cleaning up after her sister Ayoola. Ayoola is flighty, addicted to social media, but mostly Ayoola is beautiful. No man can seem to resist her charm. Or, better yet, her appearance. The thing is that Ayoola bores of her men quickly and when she's done with you she is DONE with you and she may even get a little stabby to prove her point. When Ayoola has these moments of murderous intentions it is Korede to who she calls to help. The always efficient Korede comes to save her time and time again. But what happens when Ayoola sets her sights on the doctor that Korede is infatuated with? You'll have to read it to find out. Oyinkan Braithwaite, I adore you and your humor. You made these characters come alive. And THAT COVER is perfection! I'd like to frame it and hang it in my house. My only gripe is the ending. It was very abrupt and I'm going to spoiler tag this (view spoiler)[WHO IS THE GUY AT THE VERY END? Another of Ayoola's conquests? Was it Muhtar? I wasn't quite clear on this. (hide spoiler)] 4 stab worthy stars! Thank you to NetGalley and Doubleday Books for proving me with a digital ARC in exchange for my honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    j e w e l s [Books Bejeweled]

    FIVE STARS I LOVE THIS!! “Femi makes three, you know. Three and they label you a serial killer.” Ok, truth here--this is not a suspenseful thriller, despite the enticing title. It IS a novel about family dynamics, love between sisters and loyalty to the ones that matter in your life. The minute I started this short, richly dark and funny book, I was HOOKED! It is elegant and lovely, all gorgeous words on a page. Set in Nigeria, very up-to-the-minute contemporary, and oh so addictive! The story cen FIVE STARS I LOVE THIS!! “Femi makes three, you know. Three and they label you a serial killer.” Ok, truth here--this is not a suspenseful thriller, despite the enticing title. It IS a novel about family dynamics, love between sisters and loyalty to the ones that matter in your life. The minute I started this short, richly dark and funny book, I was HOOKED! It is elegant and lovely, all gorgeous words on a page. Set in Nigeria, very up-to-the-minute contemporary, and oh so addictive! The story centers around a beautiful 20-something that is so alluring, every man falls in love with her at first sight. Unfortunately for them, our pretty girl tends to murder the man after she grows tired of him. Her older sister is the slightly bitter one, responsible with a full time job and a neatnik cleaning fetish. This comes in handy since her little sis calls her after every murder to help clean up and dispose of the body. DOES THIS SOUND CRAZY???? Yes, it is. And like I said, I love it!! I don't think it is for everyone, but if you are open-minded and adventurous in your reading, I highly recommend it! It is actually a very sweet story with just a bit of a sting. The audio version is superb. I could listen to that gorgeous Nigerian accent all day long!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kendall

    "On their one month anniversary, she stabbed him in the bathroom of his apartment. She didn't mean to, of course." Braithwaite has written an exquisite dark tale about murder that bind two sisters together. I loved Braithwaite's sense of humor and sass in this mix of murder! Korede has always come to her younger sister Ayoola's side when she needs her even when it involves dead bodies upon dead bodies. The story starts out with a bang.... as we see already a murder that is being covered up by Ay "On their one month anniversary, she stabbed him in the bathroom of his apartment. She didn't mean to, of course." Braithwaite has written an exquisite dark tale about murder that bind two sisters together. I loved Braithwaite's sense of humor and sass in this mix of murder! Korede has always come to her younger sister Ayoola's side when she needs her even when it involves dead bodies upon dead bodies. The story starts out with a bang.... as we see already a murder that is being covered up by Ayoola and Korede. Talk about a kicker to this start of a novel! This story definitely packs a punch in this 180 page book! I would definitely recommend this novel to anyone that has an interest in human psyche, murder, and crazy characters! Overall, 4 stars for this unique and dark tale. Huge thank you to Doubleday and Netgalley for a copy of this arc in exchange for my honest thoughts. Publication date: 11/20/18 Published to GR: 10/15/18

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rincey

    4.5 stars This was so much better than I expected. See me talk about it briefly in my May wrap up: https://youtu.be/ymb11Zcb248?t=4m36s

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kelly (and the Book Boar)

    Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ “Three, and they label you a serial killer.” Korede has always felt it was her responsibility to look after her younger sister Ayoola. Not only is Korede older, but she’s also the sensible one, the one with the good job. And while she may not be the “pretty” one – at least she doesn’t have a habit of murdering her boyfriends. Thus is the plot behind this compact little slice of fun. If you enjoy the stabby stabby over the bump and gri Find all of my reviews at: http://52bookminimum.blogspot.com/ “Three, and they label you a serial killer.” Korede has always felt it was her responsibility to look after her younger sister Ayoola. Not only is Korede older, but she’s also the sensible one, the one with the good job. And while she may not be the “pretty” one – at least she doesn’t have a habit of murdering her boyfriends. Thus is the plot behind this compact little slice of fun. If you enjoy the stabby stabby over the bump and grind while sitting poolside, My Sister the Serial Killer might be right up your alley for a fun little time killer. 3.5 Stars because that cover deserves at least a half star all on its own . . . . ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you, NetGalley!

  9. 5 out of 5

    megs_bookrack

    **3.5-stars rounded up** My Sister, the Serial Killer is a unique novella following the perspective of a young woman, Korede, living in Lagos, Nigeria. Korede is a nurse and seems to lead a fairly normal life; she is on the straight and narrow, if you will. 'Normal' until you discover that Korede's younger sister, Ayoola, kills all of her boyfriends and then calls on Korede to help clean up the mess! "You're a big sister now, Korede. And big sisters look after little sisters." Apparently, this is **3.5-stars rounded up** My Sister, the Serial Killer is a unique novella following the perspective of a young woman, Korede, living in Lagos, Nigeria. Korede is a nurse and seems to lead a fairly normal life; she is on the straight and narrow, if you will. 'Normal' until you discover that Korede's younger sister, Ayoola, kills all of her boyfriends and then calls on Korede to help clean up the mess! "You're a big sister now, Korede. And big sisters look after little sisters." Apparently, this is the sentiment that Korede was raised with and now, no matter what her sister does, she feels obligated to PROTECT HER from everything. Protect her?!? The witch is crazy. She shows no remorse or empathy for the things she does. At one point, Korede muses, "I am more haunted by her actions than she is." Yeah! No kidding! I did fluctuate throughout the story between feeling bad for Korede for all the bullshit she had to put up with and being angry at her for not standing up to her damn sister. It was like every other chapter, like a seesaw. Ultimately I wish it would have gone a different way. I really was hoping Korede would make more growth as a character and fight back against the treatments and judgments laid on her. This is a novella though, very short, and I just don't think there was enough time for her character to get there. Overall, I felt the story was compelling, it definitely kept me interested and was unique. Thank you to the publisher, Doubleday Books, for providing me with a copy to read and review. I always appreciate the opportunity and I know a lot of people will enjoy this little tale. I look forward to seeing what comes next from Braithwaite. I like her style!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sana

    'Let's not just assume that a woman isn't capable of doing certain things, because perhaps she is, and perhaps we should watch out for her.' THAT'S IT, THAT'S THE BOOK. (Also that whole article by the author is all kinds of amazing and you should read it. Preferably after you've read the book.) LIKE I CAN'T BELIEVE I READ A 228 PAGES LONG BOOK, A DEBUT, AND FUCKING LOVED IT My Sister, the Serial Killer is a bit of a mindfuck of a book with the only person who's really having any fund at all (while, 'Let's not just assume that a woman isn't capable of doing certain things, because perhaps she is, and perhaps we should watch out for her.' THAT'S IT, THAT'S THE BOOK. (Also that whole article by the author is all kinds of amazing and you should read it. Preferably after you've read the book.) LIKE I CAN'T BELIEVE I READ A 228 PAGES LONG BOOK, A DEBUT, AND FUCKING LOVED IT My Sister, the Serial Killer is a bit of a mindfuck of a book with the only person who's really having any fund at all (while, the others are all clearly distressed LOL) is the female serial killer. I really loved Braithwaite's take on the subject and how the book is definitely funny in a gory way and does such great satire. Moreover, the characters of the two sisters, Korede and Ayoola, (and really, all the cast) are all well-developed and it's very clear to see where they're coming and possibly where they're headed. The trauma that they both went through and how differently they came through it and what bonded them and what drove them apart. Ayoola is not really an unlikeable character but she's also not likeable and I loved that because at the end of the day, she's a murderer and then there's her sister, Korede the main character, who has to deal with that fact and how she deals with is quite something in itself. HONESTLY, WHAT A BOOK As for plot, it's a mix of old and new but not enough to make it predictable especially when it came to the actions of the character themselves. I loved all of the social commentary, the discourse on gender roles and physical appearances, navigating the world of social media and the relationship dynamic of Korede and Ayoola, which is the essence of the story. Also, then the fact that it's set in Nigeria and JUST ALL THE GOOD STUFF, 10/10 WOULD RECOMMEND Favorite quotes: 'It takes a whole lot longer to dispose of a body than to dispose of a soul, especially if you don't want to leave any evidence of foul play.' 'Who is to say that an object does not come with its own agenda? Or that the collective agenda of its previous owners does not direct its purpose still?' 'I wonder what the chances are that the death of a person in the company of a serial killer would come about by chance.' -------------- One sister murders, the other sister cleans up the mess. HELLO, I WANT

  11. 4 out of 5

    Valerity (Val)

    My Sister, the Serial Killer I thought I might try a change of pace and something new for me with this FICTIONAL  thriller titled, My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite. Set in Lagos, Nigeria... Ayoola keeps knocking off boyfriends and calling her sister Korede in the night for help. It’s totally getting out of hand and becoming a real problem. Korede is a great problem solver in this instance, because of her job working in a hospital cleaning, she knows how to clean up blood great. My Sister, the Serial Killer I thought I might try a change of pace and something new for me with this FICTIONAL  thriller titled, My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite. Set in Lagos, Nigeria... Ayoola keeps knocking off boyfriends and calling her sister Korede in the night for help. It’s totally getting out of hand and becoming a real problem. Korede is a great problem solver in this instance, because of her job working in a hospital cleaning, she knows how to clean up blood great. And she’s also ace at moving bodies. They make a wonderful team but this has got to stop. Ayoola is a menace to the safety of the men of Nigeria. Despite being the older sister and feeling responsible for her, Korede is worried sick about the situation and is afraid they will both end up in prison. "Femi makes three you know. Three and they label you a serial killer." Actually, it’s since been changed to only two killings, but I don’t think many outside the authorities would know that. This was a good crime thriller, fast paced and didn’t take a long time to read. I quite enjoyed it. My thanks for the advance electronic copy that was provided by NetGalley, author Oyinkan Braithwaite, and the publisher for my fair review. My BookZone blog, full review here: https://wordpress.com/post/bookblog20...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Blair

    Korede is a nurse whose beautiful sister, Ayoola, has an unfortunate habit of getting bored of her boyfriends and dispatching them with a large knife. Korede acts as her one-woman cleanup team. Whenever she questions Ayoola's explanations, she buries her doubts – blood is thicker than water, after all. But the stakes change when Ayoola starts dating Tade, the doctor Korede is infatuated with. My Sister, the Serial Killer is a fast, fun novel; it tells a dark story but keeps the tone light. Kored Korede is a nurse whose beautiful sister, Ayoola, has an unfortunate habit of getting bored of her boyfriends and dispatching them with a large knife. Korede acts as her one-woman cleanup team. Whenever she questions Ayoola's explanations, she buries her doubts – blood is thicker than water, after all. But the stakes change when Ayoola starts dating Tade, the doctor Korede is infatuated with. My Sister, the Serial Killer is a fast, fun novel; it tells a dark story but keeps the tone light. Korede is sympathetic; Ayoola is palpably charismatic. (Usually, I can't stand the trope of a character everyone falls head over heels in love with, but here Braithwaite made me believe it.) The sisters have a complicated family background, and this keeps things consistently intriguing. The setting of contemporary Lagos is an added bonus. If anything, I'd have liked more of everything. More of Ayoola's antics (perhaps some chapters told from her point of view?), more of Korede's day-to-day life at the hospital, more of the sisters' past, a better ending for Korede. Whether she revisits these characters or not, I'll definitely read more from Oyinkan Braithwaite. (If you enjoy this, you'll probably also like CJ Skuse's Sweetpea, and vice versa.) I received an advance review copy of My Sister, the Serial Killer from the publisher through Edelweiss. TinyLetter | Twitter | Instagram | Tumblr

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nadia

    As soon as I saw the intriguing title of the book and the beautiful cover, I knew i had to read it. And I'm so glad I did! Korede and Ayoola are sisters. Korede is the older, sensible one and Ayoola is the pretty and reckless one. Sounds pretty ordinary so far, doesn't it. Except...Ayoola is a serial killer who likes killing her boyfriends and then calling her sister to come and help cleaning up. "On their one-month anniversary, she stabbed him in the bathroom of his apartment. She didn't mean to As soon as I saw the intriguing title of the book and the beautiful cover, I knew i had to read it. And I'm so glad I did! Korede and Ayoola are sisters. Korede is the older, sensible one and Ayoola is the pretty and reckless one. Sounds pretty ordinary so far, doesn't it. Except...Ayoola is a serial killer who likes killing her boyfriends and then calling her sister to come and help cleaning up. "On their one-month anniversary, she stabbed him in the bathroom of his apartment. She didn't mean to, of course." This was an entertaining read that I would describe as a black comedy. I think the book might appeal to a wide range of readers due its wit and great punch lines. "How was your trip? It was fine...except...he died." Many thanks to NetGalley and Atlantic Books for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Woodbury

    A slim, slow-burn of a suspense novel. It took me a little while to get into it, but once I did it moves quickly and you can read it in a day without much trouble. This is one of those crime novels that starts with the clean up, but the big question isn't whether the sisters will get caught. It's not even whether beautiful, careless Ayoola will kill again. The question is why Korede cleans up after her. Of course, the book considers these other questions and most of the plot is built around them A slim, slow-burn of a suspense novel. It took me a little while to get into it, but once I did it moves quickly and you can read it in a day without much trouble. This is one of those crime novels that starts with the clean up, but the big question isn't whether the sisters will get caught. It's not even whether beautiful, careless Ayoola will kill again. The question is why Korede cleans up after her. Of course, the book considers these other questions and most of the plot is built around them. But what I was really there for were the occasional flashbacks, the glimpses at the family and history that brought these women to the drastically different places they are. I could have used a little more of that, but this is still a smart and satisfying book.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Roman Clodia

    On their one-month anniversary, she stabbed him in the bathroom of his apartment. She didn't mean to, of course. Braithwaite has written a dazzlingly dark novel that pitches the blood of murders against the blood that binds two sisters, sometimes reluctantly together. With perfect pitch, she unrolls a story set in modern-day Lagos as nurse Korede is alarmed to find her serial-killer sister dating the handsome doctor with whom Korede herself has long been in love... One of the things I like about On their one-month anniversary, she stabbed him in the bathroom of his apartment. She didn't mean to, of course. Braithwaite has written a dazzlingly dark novel that pitches the blood of murders against the blood that binds two sisters, sometimes reluctantly together. With perfect pitch, she unrolls a story set in modern-day Lagos as nurse Korede is alarmed to find her serial-killer sister dating the handsome doctor with whom Korede herself has long been in love... One of the things I like about this is that Braithwaite doesn't hang around: when so many novels are padded full of waffle, this one gets to the heart of the matter from page 1. Not that that means this lacks depth: on the contrary, we're kept enthralled by both the 'present' story of what's going to happen in this oh-so unconventional love triangle, even while we're also intrigued by Ayoola's psyche and her complicated, layered relationship with her sister. Buoyant and generous, with a welcome dose of humour and some sharp points about gender and power, this is refreshing and intelligent, with a hint of Ottessa Moshfegh's trademark off-kilter storytelling - definitely a writer to watch. Many thanks to Atlantic Books for an ARC via NetGalley

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Canaves

    It was even better than I wanted it to be! A deliciously wicked title for a deliciously wicked book that is equally smart in its tackling of women’s issues. Korede has always come to her younger sister Ayoola’s defense, even after Ayoola has left a trail of dead bodies behind her, but when both sisters set eyes on the same man, Korede’s defense of Ayoola’s murderous ways is going to get put to the test…Love future you and pre-order this title so you can soon thank past you for the awesomely thoug It was even better than I wanted it to be! A deliciously wicked title for a deliciously wicked book that is equally smart in its tackling of women’s issues. Korede has always come to her younger sister Ayoola’s defense, even after Ayoola has left a trail of dead bodies behind her, but when both sisters set eyes on the same man, Korede’s defense of Ayoola’s murderous ways is going to get put to the test…Love future you and pre-order this title so you can soon thank past you for the awesomely thoughtful gift.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Cleveland

    My thanks to Doubleday Books, and Netgalley for this arc. I really thought I'd love this book. It had some fantastic reviews on Goodreads. Turns out I hated it. I'm one of those people who have to have somebody to like and root for. I couldn't abide the sister's in this book. One bemoans her fate, and the other is a selfish, spoiled serial killer. One cleans up her sister's messes...ach! To hell with it. The book sucked. The writing was well done, and I'd read something else by this author. But, My thanks to Doubleday Books, and Netgalley for this arc. I really thought I'd love this book. It had some fantastic reviews on Goodreads. Turns out I hated it. I'm one of those people who have to have somebody to like and root for. I couldn't abide the sister's in this book. One bemoans her fate, and the other is a selfish, spoiled serial killer. One cleans up her sister's messes...ach! To hell with it. The book sucked. The writing was well done, and I'd read something else by this author. But, I need to like someone!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marchpane

    3.5 stars The premise is right there in the title: Ayoola keeps killing her boyfriends and her sister Korede gets roped in to clean up her messes, literally and figuratively. Drama ensues when they both set their sights on the same guy. Written in a breezy style with short punchy chapters, this is an even quicker read than the page count suggests. It’s fun, clever and engaging, but a bit too snack-sized to really satisfy.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    3.5 stars Korede and Ayoola are sisters yet they could not be any more different. Korede is a dedicated nurse who puts others needs before her own. "Ayoola lives in a world where things must go her way. It's a law as certain as the law of gravity." Her selfishness is only eclipsed by her beauty. But Ayoola has a problem. Despite her charming ways with men her last three boyfriends have died by her hand. She has only gotten away with it because Korede always cleans up her messes. Literally. She ge 3.5 stars Korede and Ayoola are sisters yet they could not be any more different. Korede is a dedicated nurse who puts others needs before her own. "Ayoola lives in a world where things must go her way. It's a law as certain as the law of gravity." Her selfishness is only eclipsed by her beauty. But Ayoola has a problem. Despite her charming ways with men her last three boyfriends have died by her hand. She has only gotten away with it because Korede always cleans up her messes. Literally. She gets rid of the body, wipes down surfaces to destroy forensic evidence and conjurs up excuses of plausible deniability. Korede feels bad but what is she to do. Is it not her responsibility as the big sister to take of and protect Ayoola even if it places unsuspecting men in harm's way? When the handsome doctor Tade that she has been pining for sets his eyes on Ayoola Korede must decide with whom does her loyalty reside. A darkly comic thrill, My Sister the Serial Killer is a pill that's easy to swallow.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I received a copy of this title via NetGalley. It does not impact my review. I always enjoy a good serial killer thriller. This one was a little different than others I have read before and from what I was expecting, but I enjoyed it just as much. I absolutely loved Oyinkan Braithwaite’s writing style. I love short chapters and she was able to really use them effectively. I flew right through this book because I was never able to say “just one more chapter” and actually mean it. Even though the pl I received a copy of this title via NetGalley. It does not impact my review. I always enjoy a good serial killer thriller. This one was a little different than others I have read before and from what I was expecting, but I enjoyed it just as much. I absolutely loved Oyinkan Braithwaite’s writing style. I love short chapters and she was able to really use them effectively. I flew right through this book because I was never able to say “just one more chapter” and actually mean it. Even though the plot was never exactly harrowing, there was definitely a tense atmosphere and I had to do know what would happen next. It also managed to not be a really heavy or somber read. It was just really entertaining. So how is this different than other serial killer stories? It’s told from the point of view of Korede, the sister of the killer, Ayoola. Korede is the older sister who has always taken care of Ayoola, even into adulthood. That includes cleaning up after her murders. Ayoola always claims self defense, but Korede has kind of stopped believing her. While no deep, psychological explanation is given for Ayoola’s behavior, we do explore the sisters’ childhood with their abusive father that we get to draw our own conclusions from. The story is really more about Korede’s relationship with her sister, who she both loves and resents and the choices she must make when the man she has feelings for falls into Ayoola’s web. Overall, I really enjoyed My Sister, the Serial Killer. I loved the writing, the short chapters, and the interesting characters. I enjoyed reading about a different culture, as well. The only thing I didn’t really like about it is that I felt it left a few more things open-ended than I like. While it wasn’t the kind of story I was expecting it to be, it was really enjoyable and I definitely recommend it. I look forward to reading more from Braithwaite in the future. Overall Rating (out of 5): 4 Stars

  21. 5 out of 5

    Melanie (Perpetually Reading)

    My Sister, the Serial Killer, was a fast-paced read that unexpectedly sucked me in. The story centers around two sisters, Korede (meticulous and calculating) and Ayoola (instinctive and a bit insane), and begins with Korede having to help Ayoola clean up yet another murder. We're left with finding out why Ayoola commits these murders, and how Korede copes with her resentment and jealously towards her sister. I particularly enjoyed this novel because every single character in the story hid who the My Sister, the Serial Killer, was a fast-paced read that unexpectedly sucked me in. The story centers around two sisters, Korede (meticulous and calculating) and Ayoola (instinctive and a bit insane), and begins with Korede having to help Ayoola clean up yet another murder. We're left with finding out why Ayoola commits these murders, and how Korede copes with her resentment and jealously towards her sister. I particularly enjoyed this novel because every single character in the story hid who they truly were from the other characters. Everyone is blinded by the show that they put on for one another, and the reader is left cursing each and every single one of them. Aggravating as it was to read this novel, it was definitely a page-turner, and it was oddly interesting watching the characters destroy/be destroyed by one another. This was a super quick read, and I'd definitely recommend this to anyone interested in the human psyche, crazy/irrational people, and murder.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    The black humor in Nigerian author Braithwaite’s novella focuses on the power women can achieve in a male-dominated society. For Ayoola, it is being beautiful. Her fashion-forward outfits draw attention to her physical attributes and men predictably fall in love with her. Her mother wants to gain power/prestige by having Ayoola marry well. While Ayoola likes men, she hasn’t found her soulmate and doesn’t want to be stuck with any of the boyfriends she has dated so far. So—how to avoid being smot The black humor in Nigerian author Braithwaite’s novella focuses on the power women can achieve in a male-dominated society. For Ayoola, it is being beautiful. Her fashion-forward outfits draw attention to her physical attributes and men predictably fall in love with her. Her mother wants to gain power/prestige by having Ayoola marry well. While Ayoola likes men, she hasn’t found her soulmate and doesn’t want to be stuck with any of the boyfriends she has dated so far. So—how to avoid being smothered or married off to them. Well, one handy way is to have them disappear—permanently. For Korede, her power comes from knowledge. She is a talented nurse and is doing well at the local hospital. She knows how to clean up after a murder and dispose of a body so that it won’t be found. She also knows how to keep her murderous sister off from social media for a respectful time afterwards. The blood bond between the sisters is strained when Tade, the doctor, swoons over Ayoola when she comes to visit Korede at the hospital. Korede is torn—she knows Tade is not someone Ayoola would be happy with—but how can she warn Tade without sharing incriminating details. And then there is the comatose patient that Korede has been confessing to. He suddenly wakes up and remembers everything she told him. Oh---that can’t be good. Enjoy this quick, fun read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sara➽ Ink Is My Sword

    This cover appeals so much to me, I don't even know why, but is so stunning!💚💚 Also that synopsis, WTF!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    A really interesting look at the lengths we would go to in order to protect our loved ones, even those addicted to murder. Would be a fascinating inclusion for the Tournament of Books final 16.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Sullivan

    This was a quick, dark, fun little read about two Nigerian sisters, one of whom can’t seem to stop murdering her boyfriends. It’s told from the first-person perspective of Korede, the bitter older sister who has always lived in the shadow of the beautiful Ayoola. Korede helps Ayoola cover her tracks whenever she kills, but now Ayoola has set her sights on Tade, the handsome doctor who Korede is secretly in love with. For the first time, Korede’s loyalty to her sister is tested, as she knows that This was a quick, dark, fun little read about two Nigerian sisters, one of whom can’t seem to stop murdering her boyfriends. It’s told from the first-person perspective of Korede, the bitter older sister who has always lived in the shadow of the beautiful Ayoola. Korede helps Ayoola cover her tracks whenever she kills, but now Ayoola has set her sights on Tade, the handsome doctor who Korede is secretly in love with. For the first time, Korede’s loyalty to her sister is tested, as she knows that she is the only one who can stop Ayoola. While the plot is often predicable—(example: Korede confides in a comatose patient at the hospital where she works whom we can easily guess will eventually wake up)—the clever and satirical undertones prevent that and the novel’s cursory narrative from feeling too much like flaws. What I found most compelling of all was Korede’s stake in all of it. Does her complicity make her any better or less dangerous than her sister? What motives drive her choices and actions? There are subtle hints of darkness inside her, too; they just manifest less dramatically.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)

    3.5 stars Ayoola's beauty and charm have made her spoiled.  She's used to getting everything she wants and that makes her sister Korede a little bitter.  Especially when Korede has to clean up her sister's murders. ...Wait, what? It's true.  Korede and Ayoola both suffered abuse at the hands of their father who is now thankfully dead.  So when Ayoola tells her sister that she was defending herself against a boyfriend, Korede rushes to help dispose of the body and all evidence to protect her. But t 3.5 stars Ayoola's beauty and charm have made her spoiled.  She's used to getting everything she wants and that makes her sister Korede a little bitter.  Especially when Korede has to clean up her sister's murders. ...Wait, what? It's true.  Korede and Ayoola both suffered abuse at the hands of their father who is now thankfully dead.  So when Ayoola tells her sister that she was defending herself against a boyfriend, Korede rushes to help dispose of the body and all evidence to protect her. But then more die at the hands of Ayoola who swears self defense and there are more boyfriends to dispose of and messes to clean up for Korede, who is growing not only tired but suspicious. When a handsome doctor at the hospital where Korede works as a nurse sets his eyes on Ayoola, Korede must deal with her jealousy and the fear of what her sister has become. This was a short book that packs a huge punch!  I would describe it as a slasher satire with heart.  The dark humor envelops the intense relationship between two sisters who have supported one another through childhood abuse at the hands of a parent.  Korede and Ayoola have extremely different personalities but are compelled to protect one another through some satirical situations, bringing the bond of sisterhood and abuse to the forefront of the story. I would've enjoyed more back story to further the character development but this was overall a wildly entertaining tale that takes readers to Nigeria with some brief cultural descriptions and dialogue that added to the setting I'm completely unfamiliar with. Many thanks to Doubleday Books and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review.  My Sister, the Serial Killer is scheduled for release on November 20, 2018. For more full reviews, visit www.rootsandreads.wordpress.com

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rachel (rachandbooks)

    "Femi makes three, you know. Three and they label you a serial killer." This book was amazing! Like, really, go ahead and preorder this one. Especially if you're interested in a tense modern noir full of murder and sisters and deadpan wit. It is such an impressive debut that will have you flipping pages as fast as you can. You won't regret it. My Sister, the Serial Killer, while on the shorter side, has SO MANY LAYERS to it. It's a sharp as nails and a darkly funny novel about a family going throu "Femi makes three, you know. Three and they label you a serial killer." This book was amazing! Like, really, go ahead and preorder this one. Especially if you're interested in a tense modern noir full of murder and sisters and deadpan wit. It is such an impressive debut that will have you flipping pages as fast as you can. You won't regret it. My Sister, the Serial Killer, while on the shorter side, has SO MANY LAYERS to it. It's a sharp as nails and a darkly funny novel about a family going through some stuff, to say the least. The eldest sister is Korede, a hardworking nurse who takes out her frustrations by cleaning everything in sight, and the younger sister, Ayoola, is beautiful, carefree, and has a tendency to... kill her boyfriends. While Korede, on the other hand, has a tendency to protect her sister and clean up her messes, bitter and resigned while doing so. When the doctor that Korede has a crush on shows interest in Ayoola, things get complicated quickly. What will Korede do? Who will she protect? The most interesting narrative throughout is the question most readers would have after reading the synopsis: why is Ayoola killing these men? And why does Korede keep helping her sister after it happens? Throughout the story, you learn their history together and come to understand some fundamental things about them individually and as a unit of codependent sisters. It's really a fun ride. You can absolutely feel the tension between the characters and it's fantastic. I was on the edge of my seat the whole way through the book and read it in nearly one sitting. I found it incredibly engaging and intriguing to the point where you just can't stop reading until you find out what's going to happen next. And the ending stuck the landing. I loved it. My ONLY complaint is that I wish there was more. I was struck when it was over--I wasn't ready even if I loved how it ended. These sisters are something else, and I won't forget them! Part of me wishes I could read another book about them. *crosses fingers* I LOVE MURDERESS STORIES. Oyinkan Braithwaite is a phenomenal writer. Her humor is outrageous in the best way. Her characterization and tone and atmospheric writing are dazzling. I truly admire this edgy, fun and deliciously dark book. I cannot wait to see this novel flourish. I'm already looking forward to her next project. Thank you to Doubleday Books for providing me with an ARC!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chandra Claypool (wherethereadergrows)

    The book community is fantastic. One of the many reasons is that your book friends will send you a book (thank you, Stacey) and then another will buddy read it with you (thank you, Robin)! This was the fastest buddy read ever! This book is packed full of goodness at just over 200 pages. I don't have any siblings but those that I consider family have my fullest loyalty - I could only imagine what I would do for an actual blood related sibling knowing how far I'd go for the others I consider family The book community is fantastic. One of the many reasons is that your book friends will send you a book (thank you, Stacey) and then another will buddy read it with you (thank you, Robin)! This was the fastest buddy read ever! This book is packed full of goodness at just over 200 pages. I don't have any siblings but those that I consider family have my fullest loyalty - I could only imagine what I would do for an actual blood related sibling knowing how far I'd go for the others I consider family. Here's the thing - this book reads fast - it's easily a one sit read even for those who normally don't read that voraciously. Two sisters. One killer. One clean up. Lots of craziness. And that ending. Look, I had to go back and reread it because I wanted to make sure I wasn't missing anything. Thank goodness for discussions! I'll just give you the same advice I received... don't overthink it. I highly recommend this book. Pick it up and don't plan to put it down until you're finished.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    I dare you to read the first chapter of this book and then put it down! The first chapter is only two sentences so I'll give it to you...."Ayoola summons me with these words...Korede, I killed him. I hoped I would never hear those words again." Now tell me you don't want to read it...lol. The hardback is the size of a trade paperback, only 226 pages long, the chapters are short, the prose is sparing and the story is riveting. It's basically a psychological study of the relationship between two sis I dare you to read the first chapter of this book and then put it down! The first chapter is only two sentences so I'll give it to you...."Ayoola summons me with these words...Korede, I killed him. I hoped I would never hear those words again." Now tell me you don't want to read it...lol. The hardback is the size of a trade paperback, only 226 pages long, the chapters are short, the prose is sparing and the story is riveting. It's basically a psychological study of the relationship between two sisters but there is enough plot (serial killings) to move things along. I can say this was truly a fun read. I hope this debut author has more stories to tell.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Adah Udechukwu

    My Sister, the serial killer is pretty cool. The novel is witty, fun and compelling.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.