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Sherlock Holmes and the Sussex Sea-Devils

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The stunning new novel from the New York Times bestselling author of The Age of Odin, in which the worlds of Arthur Conan Doyle and H.P. Lovecraft collide. Now retired from detective work, Sherlock Holmes is called on once again to do battle with occult forces. Unrest in Europe is threatening to turn into all-out war, and there are certain parties who would seek to gain f The stunning new novel from the New York Times bestselling author of The Age of Odin, in which the worlds of Arthur Conan Doyle and H.P. Lovecraft collide. Now retired from detective work, Sherlock Holmes is called on once again to do battle with occult forces. Unrest in Europe is threatening to turn into all-out war, and there are certain parties who would seek to gain from the mass slaughter. When his brother, Mycroft, is found dead on a lonely stretch of beach in Sussex, the body covered in slime and hideously mutilated, Holmes unearths a plot against members of the Diogenes Club that has far-reaching, apocalyptic consequences. With trusty Watson once more at his side, Holmes sallies forth one last time to defy the nameless, unspeakable entities from beyond who would wish to conquer the earth and make every human their slave.


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The stunning new novel from the New York Times bestselling author of The Age of Odin, in which the worlds of Arthur Conan Doyle and H.P. Lovecraft collide. Now retired from detective work, Sherlock Holmes is called on once again to do battle with occult forces. Unrest in Europe is threatening to turn into all-out war, and there are certain parties who would seek to gain f The stunning new novel from the New York Times bestselling author of The Age of Odin, in which the worlds of Arthur Conan Doyle and H.P. Lovecraft collide. Now retired from detective work, Sherlock Holmes is called on once again to do battle with occult forces. Unrest in Europe is threatening to turn into all-out war, and there are certain parties who would seek to gain from the mass slaughter. When his brother, Mycroft, is found dead on a lonely stretch of beach in Sussex, the body covered in slime and hideously mutilated, Holmes unearths a plot against members of the Diogenes Club that has far-reaching, apocalyptic consequences. With trusty Watson once more at his side, Holmes sallies forth one last time to defy the nameless, unspeakable entities from beyond who would wish to conquer the earth and make every human their slave.

48 review for Sherlock Holmes and the Sussex Sea-Devils

  1. 5 out of 5

    The Tattooed Book Geek (Drew).

    As always this review can also be found on my blog The Tattooed Book Geek: https://thetattooedbookgeek.wordpress... Sherlock Holmes and the Sussex Sea-Devils is the third and final book in The Cthulu Casebooks trilogy by Lovegrove following on from the previous two releases the Shadwell Shadows and the Miskatonic Monstrosities. Both of those are fantastic books (you definitely need to read them both before tackling this one) that are well worth a read and the trilogy, on the whole, pays homage to As always this review can also be found on my blog The Tattooed Book Geek: https://thetattooedbookgeek.wordpress... Sherlock Holmes and the Sussex Sea-Devils is the third and final book in The Cthulu Casebooks trilogy by Lovegrove following on from the previous two releases the Shadwell Shadows and the Miskatonic Monstrosities. Both of those are fantastic books (you definitely need to read them both before tackling this one) that are well worth a read and the trilogy, on the whole, pays homage to and honours the originals while creating a wonderfully unique read. The Cthulu Casebooks merge together Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic literary characters of Sherlock Holmes, Dr John Watson and Professor James Moriarty with H. P Lovecraft’s Cthulu mythos. On the surface, the pairing is a rather weird mix. You have the world’s colliding, the rational and the irrational. On one side, Holmes with his intellect, his analytical thinking and his skills of deduction and on the other, the strange otherworldy supernatural element of the Cthulu mythology. They are two polar opposites but the merging of the two canon’s works. In fact, it works extremely well and when you factor in that Lovegrove is a tremendous storyteller, well then, you have a marvellous mash-up, something that is bizarre yet brilliant, wholly imaginative and a winner on your hands. The tale behind the trilogy goes that Lovegrove is a distant relative to H. P. Lovecraft and he inherited a trio of manuscripts that had been given to Lovecraft by Dr. John Watson. Watson wrote the manuscripts later in his life, near the end of his time, attempting to purge his soul, pulling back the veil and finally revealing the truth behind Holmes many investigations. Previously, when writing up his accounts of Holmes and his investigations Watson had ignored the supernatural that had plagued Holmes career. Either removing anything eldritch from the investigation or changing it to something that while fitting with the narrative (for example a man in a mask as opposed to a creature) kept it in the realms of the believable. Turning those crime-solving exploits into fiction and the stories that are beloved by millions worldwide. The Shadwell Shadows, The Miskatonic Monstrosities and The Sussex Sea-Devils are the three manuscripts. Now, in the hands of Lovegrove and with minimal editing those manuscripts have become The Cthulu Casebooks trilogy. After a lifetime of battling R’luhlloig and his evil forces Sherlock Holmes, now, in his fifties has retired to a small homestead on the Sussex Downs. Trading in the majority of investigations (though he still dabbles, particularly in those cases of an eldritch nature and when needed keeping up the fight against R’luhlloig and his minions) for beekeeping. Watson remains in London at his medical practice and the start of the Sussex Sea-Devils sees him visiting Holmes in Sussex and falling straight into an investigation that Holmes is currently undertaking. Later in the day, after the investigation is concluded, Holmes and Watson return to the small farm that Holmes owns to catch-up on their lives. For Holmes, it is also a chance to explain to Watson what had just transpired with the investigation, to elaborate on what was going on and to tell him what he had unexpectedly stumbled into. Later, Watson is awakened from his slumber by the telephone ringing. It is Mycroft Holmes, Sherlock’s older brother, incoherently babbling nonsense down the line. With Watson, devoted and ever faithful by his side, he rushes to London as quick as humanly possible to find out what has befallen Mycroft and to hopefully discern the cause behind his insensate state. Holmes, sadly, is too late to save his older brother and Mycroft is already dead by the time the duo arrive at his house. Mycroft, however, isn’t the only person to be found dead. The rest of the Dagon Club, a secret group comprised of renowned members of the Diogenes Club have also all perished during the night. The subsequent investigation inevitably leads Holmes back to R’luhlloig who is attempting to bring to fruition a nefarious plan, years in the making. Holmes and Watson manage to escape and then evade the clutches and the grasp of the long arm of The Hidden Mind. Returning to Sussex where they wait, hiding, recuperating and biding their time before R’luhlloig strikes once again. During the quiet period, the calm before the storm and the lull in activity from R’luhlloig Holmes takes on a new case. There are reports of a trio of women going missing in the nearby village of Newford. Old folklore tales of the area abound, every couple of hundred years humanoid creatures (the Sea-Devils of the title) come from out of the sea, the sea churns, the mist rolls down covering the entire village in a fog and women are taken, never to be seen again. Once more the game is afoot as Holmes and Watson investigate, delving into the mystery and revealing the truth behind the Sea-Devils. The influence of R’luhlloig can be felt and his plan is heading towards its culmination. Leading us to R’lyeh, the resting place of Cthulu and the ultimate tentacled showdown between the Great Old Ones, the Outer Gods, Holmes and R’luhlloig. I love the whole presentation (the image doesn’t do it justice, in real-life the book cover is stunning) and Lovegrove, from the beginning to the end shows a dedication to his craft going all-in with his pretence. Exuding a sense of Kayfabe and keeping up the charade that he has crafted throughout the duration of the entire trilogy. There are prefaces by Lovegrove, forewords by Watson, epilogues by Watson and, for The Sussex Sea-Devils an additional afterword by Lovegrove and then a publisher’s note by Titan Books to close the tale that all add to the sense of kayfabe and the blurring of the lines of reality. The Sussex Sea-Devils isn’t a story to take too seriously. However, it is a dark story that has some deep moments included and it is filled with twists, turns and tension. It is a story to lose yourself in, a story whereby you switch off, enjoy the ride and just have some fun reading. This isn’t a detriment to the book. Far from it, I loved it (like I have loved the whole trilogy) and it is that fun aspect that keeps the pages turning, the reader engaged and makes both The Sussex Sea-Devils and The Cthulu Casebooks so damn enjoyable and entertaining to read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Is it really three years since I started to read this series? With Sherlock Holmes and the Sussex Sea-Devils we get to the third, and I believe final, book in this mashup of HP Lovecraft’s imagination and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s most famous creation. This third book is set in 1910, about seven years after the last novel (Sherlock Holmes and the Miskatonic Monstrocities). As in the original Conan Doyle stories, Sherlock Holmes, to all intents and purposes, has retired from sleuthing and moved to Is it really three years since I started to read this series? With Sherlock Holmes and the Sussex Sea-Devils we get to the third, and I believe final, book in this mashup of HP Lovecraft’s imagination and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s most famous creation. This third book is set in 1910, about seven years after the last novel (Sherlock Holmes and the Miskatonic Monstrocities). As in the original Conan Doyle stories, Sherlock Holmes, to all intents and purposes, has retired from sleuthing and moved to Eastbourne, to take up beekeeping. Doctor Watson has stayed in London to carry on with his doctor’s practice and at the beginning of the novel it is clear that the two do not spend much time in each other’s company. Unbeknown to the general public, Sherlock has actually continued to spend time fighting Cthulhu and in particular has had a number of ‘interactions’ with R’luhlloig, the god formally known as Professor James Moriarty.  When members of the Diogenes Club all die in one night, including someone close to Holmes, it appears that another plan may be coming to fruition. Following an attack on Holmes & Watson by the snake men (last seen in Sherlock Holmes and the Miskatonic Monstrocities), they retreat to Holmes’ cottage on the Sussex coast. A local businessman approaches Holmes there and asks for his help. Three young women, seemingly unconnected to each other, have disappeared from the nearby town of Newford. On further investigation Holmes and Watson are surprised to find that the locals are all too willing to accept the situation and blame the local legend of strange amphibian creatures, known as the Sussex Sea Devils, appearing from the sea to take women captive. The world also seems to be heading to war, something which may or may not involve the unseen work of R’luhlloig. Holmes and Watson are captured by R’luhlloig, who in the guise of German ambassador Baron von Herling, has designs on a more sinister purpose. The end of the novel deals with a clash between the Outer Gods and the Old Ones as R’luhlloig dares to take on the sleeping god Cthulhu. As the third book in a trilogy, it is clear that we are nearing the end here. Sherlock is in his later years in both his fictional life (created by Watson) and his ‘real’ life, shown here. Holmes and Watson reflect this winding down into old age and are showing the aches and pains associated with old age. They are less physically mobile, though Holmes’ intellect remains intact. If I had a minor quibble, I would suggest that Holmes has less sleuthing to do in this last volume than previous. I guess that this reflects the approach of physical old age, though there is no sign of senility here. He spends a lot of time being transported rather than taking action himself, though there are also times when he steps up to the mark. The highlight of the book though is the battle at R’lyeh between R’luhlloig, representing the Outer Gods, and Old One Cthulhu, which doesn’t disappoint. James channels Lovecraft’s At the Mountains of Madness with ancient ruins, slimy frog-like henchmen and monstrous evil. There’s an appropriate Postscript, which brings the story up to date and gives an acceptable ending. So: it is an unlikely pairing, but the combination of Conan Doyle and Lovecraft is an endearing one and for me works surprisingly well with its combination of Edwardian gloom and ethereal malice. Sherlock Holmes and the Sussex Sea-Devils is the culmination of this series and if you’ve liked the previous two novels you’ll like this one. Overall, the series has been a pleasant surprise, and is recommended.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Susan Gitchell

    Best of the three Cthulhu Case Books. I completely recommend reading the trilogy.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ary

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steve Grayston

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Riches

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cyber

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kaduya

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kim Shoemaker

  11. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Conlon

  12. 5 out of 5

    Els

  13. 4 out of 5

    Pawprints

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bill Martin

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michael Segal

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rene

  17. 5 out of 5

    Robert L Targosz

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tom Pheister

  19. 4 out of 5

    Charlie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Laura Blackledge

  21. 5 out of 5

    Don Haney

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Robert Collins

  23. 4 out of 5

    BookLever

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Buckley

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cor Heijboer

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ivana

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Bradshaw

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Flores

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chris Huntley

  30. 4 out of 5

    KiekerJan

  31. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Centorcelli

  32. 4 out of 5

    Jon Schafle

  33. 4 out of 5

    Fergus

  34. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

  35. 4 out of 5

    Devin Oates

  36. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Hinck

  37. 4 out of 5

    Selle

  38. 4 out of 5

    Anastasia Miramontes

  39. 4 out of 5

    Aika

  40. 5 out of 5

    Michal

  41. 5 out of 5

    Cindy McWilliams

  42. 5 out of 5

    Loretta Grant

  43. 5 out of 5

    Haley

  44. 4 out of 5

    Pete

  45. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  46. 5 out of 5

    Pardis Ahmadi

  47. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  48. 5 out of 5

    moonlight ☾

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