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Green Lanterns Vol. 7: Superhuman Trafficking

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When Green Lanterns Simon Baz and Jessica Cruz discover that a number of superheroes have vanished from Earth without a trace, their investigation leads them to a lawless planet where a ring of slavers are forcing super-beings to do their bidding! But the slavers are connected to a powerful religion protected from Green Lantern Corps authority, so Jessica and Simon must bec When Green Lanterns Simon Baz and Jessica Cruz discover that a number of superheroes have vanished from Earth without a trace, their investigation leads them to a lawless planet where a ring of slavers are forcing super-beings to do their bidding! But the slavers are connected to a powerful religion protected from Green Lantern Corps authority, so Jessica and Simon must become converts to infiltrate their sacred space. How will they defeat the church known as the Order of the Steed when the religion's leader has total control over an interplanetary army of superheroes, among them Simon's occasional companion, Night Pilot? Plus, Simon and Jessica are chosen to represent Earth at a once-in-a-millennium ceremony honoring an ancient hero of the Corps, but while there, they uncover a shocking and dangerous secret that's been buried for more than a thousand years! Writers Tim Seeley (Batman Eternal) and Andy Diggle (The Losers) join artists Barnaby Bagenda (The Omega Men), V Ken Marion (Trinity) and more in Green Lanterns Vol. 7: Superhuman Trafficking, collecting Green Lanterns #40-43 and Annual #1!


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When Green Lanterns Simon Baz and Jessica Cruz discover that a number of superheroes have vanished from Earth without a trace, their investigation leads them to a lawless planet where a ring of slavers are forcing super-beings to do their bidding! But the slavers are connected to a powerful religion protected from Green Lantern Corps authority, so Jessica and Simon must bec When Green Lanterns Simon Baz and Jessica Cruz discover that a number of superheroes have vanished from Earth without a trace, their investigation leads them to a lawless planet where a ring of slavers are forcing super-beings to do their bidding! But the slavers are connected to a powerful religion protected from Green Lantern Corps authority, so Jessica and Simon must become converts to infiltrate their sacred space. How will they defeat the church known as the Order of the Steed when the religion's leader has total control over an interplanetary army of superheroes, among them Simon's occasional companion, Night Pilot? Plus, Simon and Jessica are chosen to represent Earth at a once-in-a-millennium ceremony honoring an ancient hero of the Corps, but while there, they uncover a shocking and dangerous secret that's been buried for more than a thousand years! Writers Tim Seeley (Batman Eternal) and Andy Diggle (The Losers) join artists Barnaby Bagenda (The Omega Men), V Ken Marion (Trinity) and more in Green Lanterns Vol. 7: Superhuman Trafficking, collecting Green Lanterns #40-43 and Annual #1!

30 review for Green Lanterns Vol. 7: Superhuman Trafficking

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    I have to say Tim Seeley's writing on this book is not very good. While the idea of a dating app is funny, the story quickly shifts into slave rings and religion. Seeley really hammers us over the head on his thoughts on religion and how they are all created by charlatans as a way to control people. A religion based on literally taking over people's minds doesn't make much sense. The whole subplot of Jessica pining for Simon just because a dating app told her to is hackneyed and a throwback to t I have to say Tim Seeley's writing on this book is not very good. While the idea of a dating app is funny, the story quickly shifts into slave rings and religion. Seeley really hammers us over the head on his thoughts on religion and how they are all created by charlatans as a way to control people. A religion based on literally taking over people's minds doesn't make much sense. The whole subplot of Jessica pining for Simon just because a dating app told her to is hackneyed and a throwback to the 50's. This is such backwards way of thinking. Contrary to Seeley's beliefs men and women can be friends and colleagues without it going further. DC please don't go down the road of making Jessica and Simon a couple. Andy Diggle's story of a lantern lost eons ago was much more interesting. I like how he explored how other cultures and their societies would be constructed. It reminded me of when Alan Moore would write a Tales of the Green Lantern Corps story in the 80's. Maybe DC should hand the book over to him.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Malum

    3.5 stars. This was a pretty standard Green Lanterns volume. They do play around with the idea of Jessica being in love with Simon, but it doesn't really go anywhere here. I do give it half a star extra, however, because the art was really good.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    0.5. I love Green Lantern but wow this is just really bad. World: The art is solid, it's what I expect from this series, the colors pop and the visuals are solid. The world building here is where everything starts to fall apart. We have a clever little fun humorous idea of the App and I enjoyed that aspect of it, it was rather meta and made me giggle a bit and then the wheels just fall off as we fall into religious and gender stereotypes for the world building. With the way the religion was writt 0.5. I love Green Lantern but wow this is just really bad. World: The art is solid, it's what I expect from this series, the colors pop and the visuals are solid. The world building here is where everything starts to fall apart. We have a clever little fun humorous idea of the App and I enjoyed that aspect of it, it was rather meta and made me giggle a bit and then the wheels just fall off as we fall into religious and gender stereotypes for the world building. With the way the religion was written, portrayed and so easily used as a negative force for the sake of the story with little or no objective writing I found it rather irksome and annoying. Add to that the nonchalant way Seeley writes about Baz's belief system which is rather not entirely consistent with his character. Then there's the issue with Simon and Jess but I'll get to that below. The world building with the trafficking and the church was rather contrived and really did not follow logic at all making this world and therefore the story itself rather ridiculous. Story: Wow the pacing was bad, the dialog was bad the info dumping to talk about literally what the art was already displaying was bad, the writing was just bad. The story was uninspired, stereotyped religion easily as a way to justify one set of beliefs being right and another being wrong without any discussion or objectivity at all was rather irksome, it's not 1990 comics are different now. Then there's the dating app which started off as an interesting idea and of course I knew the match would be what it was but wow the direction that this book took with Jess and Simon is not what I want to see and a step backwards for these characters (I'll talk about it below). The end result was a rather ho hum destroy the evil cult story and an annual that was also rather ho hum and retreads a lot of Jess for the series (is there any other story than to tell her overcoming her anxiety?). Characters: Okay, why do we need the partners to be something? Why can they just simply be partners are we back in the stone age thinking a male female friendship can only end up in one place? Also why is it that we have the female pining over the male AGAIN? What kind of characterization is this? I don't like how these characters are written under Seeley, he's a great writer (Revival had wonderful female and real characters) why are we getting old cliche and gender stereotypes for this series? Can't we get better characters than this? This is ridiculous, this is not 1990 where all female partners will eventually fall in love with their male counterparts, that's so big a step backwards it's making me angry. Can we also not continue the trend of only writing stories where the only thing that Jess has for an arc is to overcome her anxiety? Is this all there is to her character? Can we not give her more depth? Can we also give Simon more depth than a dude bro? Terrible character choices and a flat and stereotypical story makes this one of the worst arcs for this run since this series started. Onward to the next book! *read individual issues*

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    [Read as single issues] Simon’s attempts at online dating end in the worst way possible when his potential match is kidnapped, and only Simon and Jessica can rescue her from an intergalactic slave trade that specializes in superheroes! Plus, an extra-sized adventure that pits the duo against an entire planet when a long forgotten Lantern makes a terrifying reappearance. This is one of those volumes that is solicited to hold a certain amount of issues, but I feel like it’s going to have a lot more [Read as single issues] Simon’s attempts at online dating end in the worst way possible when his potential match is kidnapped, and only Simon and Jessica can rescue her from an intergalactic slave trade that specializes in superheroes! Plus, an extra-sized adventure that pits the duo against an entire planet when a long forgotten Lantern makes a terrifying reappearance. This is one of those volumes that is solicited to hold a certain amount of issues, but I feel like it’s going to have a lot more in it when it actually comes out. But for now I’ll just stick to the solicited issues, which are #40-43, and Annual #1 of the series, which would make it the penultimate Tim Seeley volume. Seeley’s first few stories on this series didn’t land particularly well. This one’s not a lot better, but it’s definitely an improvement. He draws on the subplots that both he and previous writer Sam Humphries laid out to throw Simon and Jess across the universe into the midst of a cross between a slavery ring and the Universal Church Of Truth from the Guardians of the Galaxy comics, with varying degrees of success. The idea is sound, although the execution is a bit haphazard, with a lot of throwaway characters involved for only a few pages. I did appreciate the re-emergence of one of the Omega Men, characters I thought would go neglected unless Tom King decided he wanted to do a follow-up series to his critically acclaimed run. The annual suffers from having enough story for a normal sized issue and about 10 pages where nothing happens as a result. This is another one where the idea is sound (long lost Lantern returns, doesn’t realise that things are different because he’s been gone for so long, misunderstandings ensue) but the execution falls flat because it takes too long to get anywhere. This is Andy Diggle’s first DC work in years I believe, after his ill-fated Action Comics run (of one issue), so it’s nice to see him again, but he doesn’t really get the best hand to work with. On the art front, Barnaby Bagenda and V. Ken Marion share the main issues, so we don’t see any of the usual Green Lanterns suspects like Ronan Cliquet, while Mike Perkins draws the annual. Perkins’ dark and dreary style is a good fit for the underground and isolated aspects of the story, but the bigger meetings of the Green Lanterns aren’t really his forté. “Good on paper but not in actuality” is probably a good way to round up this volume; lots of ideas that sound great, but aren’t executed quite as well as they could be, both from the main series and the extra-sized annual. I have to say that Tim Seeley’s run is definitely improving though (and the next volume is much better once again, actually), so the future is bright.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    Minor superheroes are missing! Most of them we've never heard of (with the exception of Night Pilot, though we only know her because Simon dated her), but enough have gone missing that Cyborg tasks our two Green Lanterns to search out what is going on. Turns out that a superhero dating app called Caper is connected to all the missing people. The app was created by an alien church called the Order of the Steed and they are using it to gather superhuman slaves. Going in undercover merely as Simon a Minor superheroes are missing! Most of them we've never heard of (with the exception of Night Pilot, though we only know her because Simon dated her), but enough have gone missing that Cyborg tasks our two Green Lanterns to search out what is going on. Turns out that a superhero dating app called Caper is connected to all the missing people. The app was created by an alien church called the Order of the Steed and they are using it to gather superhuman slaves. Going in undercover merely as Simon and Jessica, they are able to gather enough evidence for the GLC to demand they stop their slave trade. But when they begin to make arrests, they find that the majority of the Order members are being mind controlled by a creature called a Durlan... honestly, the story is good, but a little hard to keep straight. I still enjoy this series, but I'd really love to see the stakes of everything Lantern really be shook up like back when Geoff Johns was writing it. Perhaps with the coming of the "Ultraviolet Lanterns"...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kim Dyer

    This is the first trade of this series that I have felt just completely apathetic towards. While the idea of a dating app for heroes is amusing, the plot arc quickly shifts from this. It instead focus on the slave trade and the negative effect of religion, and does so in an incredibly heavy-handed way. The story moves in fits and starts, filled with heavy exposition and unnatural feeling blocks of text. Worse still, it starts to set up Simon and Jessica as a couple. Why? Why is this a necessity i This is the first trade of this series that I have felt just completely apathetic towards. While the idea of a dating app for heroes is amusing, the plot arc quickly shifts from this. It instead focus on the slave trade and the negative effect of religion, and does so in an incredibly heavy-handed way. The story moves in fits and starts, filled with heavy exposition and unnatural feeling blocks of text. Worse still, it starts to set up Simon and Jessica as a couple. Why? Why is this a necessity in this day and age. I loved them being friends and partners. Why do writers still think that a man and woman can't be friends without it going further than that? I seriously hope that the series is not going to pursue this further. Yet, gripes aside, the art of this series is still nice and clean, and I did enjoy the final stand-alone issue a lot more than the main story. Hopefully, the Superhuman Trafficking arc was just a blip and the series will get better again from here.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Liz (Quirky Cat)

    I read Green Lanterns Vol. 7 as single issues. Individual Issues: Forty, Forty-one, Forty-two, Forty-three For more reviews, check out Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    Seeley is a good writer, so rating this low hurts and in no way reflects my thoughts on his other work. But this story had "Editorial Mandates" written all over it. (I hope, at least.) Dialogue was perfectly fine. Forcing a love interest where there never needed to be one really bothered me. Thinking that "Superhero Tinder" wasn't immediately suspicious as a villainous trap was just insulting to a reader. Tasteless use of religion was annoying. Just a very contrived and bland story. Here's hoping Seeley is a good writer, so rating this low hurts and in no way reflects my thoughts on his other work. But this story had "Editorial Mandates" written all over it. (I hope, at least.) Dialogue was perfectly fine. Forcing a love interest where there never needed to be one really bothered me. Thinking that "Superhero Tinder" wasn't immediately suspicious as a villainous trap was just insulting to a reader. Tasteless use of religion was annoying. Just a very contrived and bland story. Here's hoping Seeley gets back to some freedom with his work.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ido

    4.5 I do not know why so many people hate this book. I really like it! It's just a crazy book and I really really like it. True, there are some problems. And I got a bit bored at the Annual. But there are so many cool and fun things here that they just have to be here! And if you're so interested in what I've been enjoying so much here. So without spoilers: space, plot, art, battles and more! Very highly recommended!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Dinges

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kurt Lorenz

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Villwock

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alan Waltrip

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Kane

  17. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Nevish

  18. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Maluck

  19. 5 out of 5

    Andres Halden

  20. 4 out of 5

    Romain

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Lynch

  22. 4 out of 5

    AwH

  23. 5 out of 5

    Scott wachter

  24. 4 out of 5

    James Huston

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ross Buffa

  27. 4 out of 5

    Robert Greenberger

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jonathon

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Thomas

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