kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Beyoncé in Formation: Remixing Black Feminism

Availability: Ready to download

Making headlines when it was launched in 2015, Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley's undergraduate course "Beyoncé Feminism, Rihanna Womanism" has inspired students from all walks of life. In Beyoncé in Formation, Tinsley now takes her rich observations beyond the classroom, using the blockbuster album and video Lemonade as a soundtrack for vital next-millennium narratives. Woven wit Making headlines when it was launched in 2015, Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley's undergraduate course "Beyoncé Feminism, Rihanna Womanism" has inspired students from all walks of life. In Beyoncé in Formation, Tinsley now takes her rich observations beyond the classroom, using the blockbuster album and video Lemonade as a soundtrack for vital next-millennium narratives. Woven with candid observations about her life as a feminist scholar of African studies and a cisgender femme married to a trans spouse, Tinsley's "Femme-onade" mixtape explores myriad facets of black women's sexuality and gender. Turning to Beyoncé's "Don't Hurt Yourself," Tinsley assesses black feminist critiques of marriage and then considers the models of motherhood offered in "Daddy Lessons," interspersing these passages with memories from Tinsley's multiracial family history. Her chapters on nontraditional bonds culminate in a discussion of contemporary LGBT politics through the lens of the internet-breaking video "Formation," underscoring why Beyoncé's black femme-inism isn't only for ciswomen. From pleasure politics and the struggle for black women's reproductive justice to the subtext of blues and country music traditions, the landscape in this tour is populated by activists and artists (including Loretta Lynn) and infused with vibrant interpretations of Queen Bey's provocative, peerless imagery and lyrics. In the tradition of Roxanne Gay's Bad Feminist and Jill Lepore's bestselling cultural histories, Beyoncé in Formation is the work of a daring intellectual who is poised to spark a new conversation about freedom and identity in America.


Compare
kode adsense disini

Making headlines when it was launched in 2015, Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley's undergraduate course "Beyoncé Feminism, Rihanna Womanism" has inspired students from all walks of life. In Beyoncé in Formation, Tinsley now takes her rich observations beyond the classroom, using the blockbuster album and video Lemonade as a soundtrack for vital next-millennium narratives. Woven wit Making headlines when it was launched in 2015, Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley's undergraduate course "Beyoncé Feminism, Rihanna Womanism" has inspired students from all walks of life. In Beyoncé in Formation, Tinsley now takes her rich observations beyond the classroom, using the blockbuster album and video Lemonade as a soundtrack for vital next-millennium narratives. Woven with candid observations about her life as a feminist scholar of African studies and a cisgender femme married to a trans spouse, Tinsley's "Femme-onade" mixtape explores myriad facets of black women's sexuality and gender. Turning to Beyoncé's "Don't Hurt Yourself," Tinsley assesses black feminist critiques of marriage and then considers the models of motherhood offered in "Daddy Lessons," interspersing these passages with memories from Tinsley's multiracial family history. Her chapters on nontraditional bonds culminate in a discussion of contemporary LGBT politics through the lens of the internet-breaking video "Formation," underscoring why Beyoncé's black femme-inism isn't only for ciswomen. From pleasure politics and the struggle for black women's reproductive justice to the subtext of blues and country music traditions, the landscape in this tour is populated by activists and artists (including Loretta Lynn) and infused with vibrant interpretations of Queen Bey's provocative, peerless imagery and lyrics. In the tradition of Roxanne Gay's Bad Feminist and Jill Lepore's bestselling cultural histories, Beyoncé in Formation is the work of a daring intellectual who is poised to spark a new conversation about freedom and identity in America.

41 review for Beyoncé in Formation: Remixing Black Feminism

  1. 5 out of 5

    Scarlett

    This is a seriously misleading title and I wish this book was just a half of what I needed it to be and what it promised. Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley decided that it was a good idea to ride the wave and hide her thesis under a famous name of Beyonce and lure people into her queer propaganda. In no way I am saying that I have something against LGBT community and I root for good writers to dedicate time to write quality books that explore those subjects, but this… this is a smoke curtain for a perso This is a seriously misleading title and I wish this book was just a half of what I needed it to be and what it promised. Omise'eke Natasha Tinsley decided that it was a good idea to ride the wave and hide her thesis under a famous name of Beyonce and lure people into her queer propaganda. In no way I am saying that I have something against LGBT community and I root for good writers to dedicate time to write quality books that explore those subjects, but this… this is a smoke curtain for a personal agenda and I am so disappointed in this author. I would suggest a change of title before publication to "Being queer and listening to Beyonce". University of Texas is the chosen publisher. This was enough for me to see this book as a relevant material to read AND learn from, about what this last Beyonce’s album "Lemonade" meant for women and especially, black women (note: all terms that I am using in my review are the terms that author herself uses in the book). The biggest plus was that, supposedly, Omise’eke is an expert in teaching literature and being a self-expressed feminist. She fell right in the trap of giving too much of her own personal information and creating a memoir-like book. Not a lot of non-fiction writers can escape this, but this was beyond any decent measure. Whether you like it or not, Beyonce’s visual album "Lemonade" created a huge impact on the world when it was released. It came just in time to be related to Black lives matter movement and the mass shootings happening in the South, while also staying relevant to the ever-existing issue of female empowerment and the position of a black woman in American culture. Never before has Beyonce presented herself as a true Texas-born black woman, not in this amount, so her embracing her roots made a point all across country, music industry and the world. The lyrics and her videos all had deeper meaning behind them and for me, it was difficult to understand all the bits and pieces of African-American culture, it was so foreign to me. That being said, imagine my happiness when I saw a title, using one of the most powerful songs from that album - Formation, that promises to explain all about black feminism. Sign me up right away! I am still struggling to understand in what amount am I a feminist and what does that all mean in my community, let alone get inside the head of a black women in USA. So, that’s what I wanted to know and here’s what I learned from this book. The author is married to a transgender Matt and she has a daughter. Together, they live as a happy family in Texas. But, this is not just a mere information, we get a detailed odyssey of a queer person (that is the only term Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley uses, never calling herself lesbian or gay, so I’m just going to follow that) that gets to live and love in America, how the society comments on them having children, how her parents raised her, how her grandparents met and fell in love, what clothes does she wear, how she went to a twerk class and so on. For me, this is unwanted information, considering the title, but the author is very aware of what she’s doing. She repeatedly stays off topic and describes her own life. I kept reading even though I got the general idea of what this story is going to be about right at the beginning. I finished the book even after reaching the boiling point that was the Blac Chyna - Kardashians reference. Apparently, Blac Chyna (who knows why this made it to the book) is a symbol for feminism here. I had to read this part twice to make sure that I understood what I read. I tried to justify even mentioning these people here, by thinking - OK, this is a book related to a celebrity, maybe she wants to make a point? No, actually, the author just wanted to tell us that the Kardashians are a filthy clan appropriating black culture and stealing black guys, while poor Blac Chyna, a talented stripper who embraced her career as an exotic dancer, served as a pillar of empowered women. So, just reading this part, for laughs, is enough recommendation. This is were all credibility went through the window. At some point, the author mentions that Beyonce actually never stood for LGBT people because she never officially supported any of their movements, her songs are celebrating a straight man and woman union, motherhood and many values deemed "traditional". Nevertheless, Omise’eke Natasha Tinsley continues to interpret the songs and lyrics according to her own interests. There are so many Black Femme terms that I had to keep up to understand them and remember the difference between the real feminism and the meaning of fem(me)inine - everything related to a feminine lesbian. In her last chapter, author finally reaches the song Formation and tries to explain it, again in terms that suit her: As I watch and try to connect, I always wonder: are there any black trans women dancing in the parking lot as Beyonce declares "We slay"? None of the dancers have identified themselves as trans, to my knowledge, and probably none are. But there needs to be a black transwoman dancing to "I slay" to make good on the promise of black trans - and cisfeminine collaboration. It’s time to listen… it’s time to fight… This just went on and on. I didn’t like it at all, but I can’t deny that the writing style was very good and easy to read. It was difficult to separate personal agenda from some new ideas about feminism, but still it was empowering to some point. I want to thank to University of Texas Press for this reading opportunity, I got my edition through Edelweiss.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hanna

    For all things black, queer, and femme found in the epic production that is Lemonade, look no further! Part memoir, part critical analysis of what Tinsley argues is the "most widely distributed black feminist text of the current moment." Tinsley breaks it down by focusing on a handful of key parts of Lemonade (lucky for me, she touched on my exact favorite songs from the album). This was another book that I found myself spending a lot of time highlighting because there were SO many informative b For all things black, queer, and femme found in the epic production that is Lemonade, look no further! Part memoir, part critical analysis of what Tinsley argues is the "most widely distributed black feminist text of the current moment." Tinsley breaks it down by focusing on a handful of key parts of Lemonade (lucky for me, she touched on my exact favorite songs from the album). This was another book that I found myself spending a lot of time highlighting because there were SO many informative bits & pieces. I definitely recommend for any member of the Bey Hive as well as anyone looking to learn more about black feminism through the context of Lemonade. 💛🖤

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jay Gabler

    Definitely expanded my appreciation of Lemonade and helped me see the album's many layers. I reviewed Beyoncé in Formation for The Current.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sierra

    3.5. Interesting read that I'll definitely have to come back to after repeatedly watching Lemonade again.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Asia

  6. 5 out of 5

    Walker Iversen

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sarah (A French Girl)

    I'm NOT planning to read this book, but I felt like I needed to comment. What nonsense is that? From reviews I've read , this is essentially a personal memoir masquerading as academia. It's disturbing. What is even more disturbing is that there are people who seriously believes that Beyonce is a feminist icon. The question isn't what has Beyonce done for black women or the black community, but would Beyonce produce Afro-American centric art if she couldn't make money AND praise out of it? However I'm NOT planning to read this book, but I felt like I needed to comment. What nonsense is that? From reviews I've read , this is essentially a personal memoir masquerading as academia. It's disturbing. What is even more disturbing is that there are people who seriously believes that Beyonce is a feminist icon. The question isn't what has Beyonce done for black women or the black community, but would Beyonce produce Afro-American centric art if she couldn't make money AND praise out of it? However, to be perfectly honest, I don't think Lemonade or any of Beyonce's live performances brought any kind of benefit to the black community or were of any significance whatsoever. To me, it was just an entertainer doing her job: entertaining. Beyonce and her husband are a corporation and at the moment social activism is a hot commodity. It's business as usual for these people and I wish more people would catch that.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Doyin

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gianna

  10. 5 out of 5

    Demi

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cristina

  12. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Chesak

  13. 5 out of 5

    Phyll

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kendall Smith

  17. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kerry Rubenstein

  19. 4 out of 5

    BMR, MSW, LSW

  20. 4 out of 5

    Christina Cathcart

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bence

  22. 5 out of 5

    Karena

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lady

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Stepp

  25. 4 out of 5

    Allison

  26. 5 out of 5

    Naori

  27. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jess

  29. 5 out of 5

    Megan (Best of Fates)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Hannah

  31. 5 out of 5

    Manda

  32. 4 out of 5

    Justyn Rampa

  33. 5 out of 5

    beatriz perini

  34. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

  35. 4 out of 5

    Allison Jacobs

  36. 5 out of 5

    Katie B.

  37. 4 out of 5

    Alexander

  38. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  39. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

  40. 4 out of 5

    Blessing Ananti

  41. 4 out of 5

    Lorianna

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.