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Lord of the Butterflies

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In Andrea Gibson's latest collection, they continue their artful and nuanced looks at gender, romance, loss, and family. Each emotion here is deft and delicate, resting inside of imagery heavy enough to sink the heart, while giving the body wings to soar. “[Andrea Gibson’s poetry] will change the way you think about gender.” —Buzzfeed “They seamlessly spin hopelessness into In Andrea Gibson's latest collection, they continue their artful and nuanced looks at gender, romance, loss, and family. Each emotion here is deft and delicate, resting inside of imagery heavy enough to sink the heart, while giving the body wings to soar. “[Andrea Gibson’s poetry] will change the way you think about gender.” —Buzzfeed “They seamlessly spin hopelessness into hope, fire back at social norms, and challenge what it means to be alive and to be human.” —THEM “Andrea Gibson is an amazing queer, spoken-word poet who can make you weep with a heart-wrenching love poem and then swiftly inspire you to action with a powerful political poem.” —Seventeen


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In Andrea Gibson's latest collection, they continue their artful and nuanced looks at gender, romance, loss, and family. Each emotion here is deft and delicate, resting inside of imagery heavy enough to sink the heart, while giving the body wings to soar. “[Andrea Gibson’s poetry] will change the way you think about gender.” —Buzzfeed “They seamlessly spin hopelessness into In Andrea Gibson's latest collection, they continue their artful and nuanced looks at gender, romance, loss, and family. Each emotion here is deft and delicate, resting inside of imagery heavy enough to sink the heart, while giving the body wings to soar. “[Andrea Gibson’s poetry] will change the way you think about gender.” —Buzzfeed “They seamlessly spin hopelessness into hope, fire back at social norms, and challenge what it means to be alive and to be human.” —THEM “Andrea Gibson is an amazing queer, spoken-word poet who can make you weep with a heart-wrenching love poem and then swiftly inspire you to action with a powerful political poem.” —Seventeen

30 review for Lord of the Butterflies

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ari

    5 stars Chills. I had bloody chills reading this book. Oh dear god, Andrea Gibson can do nothing wrong. As my favorite poet I wasn't expecting any thing less from her, but those freaking goosebumps were even better than I had anticipated! ARC provided in exchange of an honest review via Netgalley

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    Having read and absolutely loved The Madness Vase (2011) in October, I couldn’t wait to pick up Andrea Gibson’s newest collection of poems. Some bits were already familiar as they’d been playfully paired with beautiful drawings by Sarah J. Coleman for the 2018 Take Me with You illustrated volume published earlier this year. Also, thanks to Button Poetry’s amazing social media presence, I’m always in awe to watch videos of Gibson performing their poems on stage. In this case, it was “Ode to t Having read and absolutely loved The Madness Vase (2011) in October, I couldn’t wait to pick up Andrea Gibson’s newest collection of poems. Some bits were already familiar as they’d been playfully paired with beautiful drawings by Sarah J. Coleman for the 2018 Take Me with You illustrated volume published earlier this year. Also, thanks to Button Poetry’s amazing social media presence, I’m always in awe to watch videos of Gibson performing their poems on stage. In this case, it was “Ode to the Public Panic Attack.” But a collection of poems is something you can experience as a whole only from cover to cover, in the order the author intended you to read them. Of course, you could always choose your own way through, read and re-read them however you fancy! If in Take Me With You , Gibson experiments with text and illustration, here we have poems in various forms: from strings of two or three liners, like “Your Life,” “First Love,” and “Baby Teeth in a Landfill,” to prose poems, like “What Do You Think about This Weather?” and “Tincture,” plus a few unexpected dictionary-entry-type poems on “Depression [verb],” “Resentment [verb],” or “White Feminism [noun].” They are queer love poems, mental health poems, and social justice poems, sometimes a subtly layered combination of all these themes and images in their signature passionate style. It was heartbreaking to read “Orlando” and “America, Reloading,” yet sometimes it takes just a couple of lines to have that powerful, hard-hitting effect: “imagine choosing nothing at all. imagine something hurting that bad” (“The Day You Died Because You Wanted To”), or a closing line: “Tell us again about goosebumps. Tell us again about pain.” (“Tincture”). “But no one heals what they refuse to look at. So when asked if I think you’re a good person, I say, I don’t believe in good people. I believe in people who are committed to knowing their own wounds intimately.” ("Daytime, Somewhere") Needless to say, Andrea Gibson is currently my favourite poet, I’m still not over “Ashes,” and I’m quite jealous of those who discovered them years and years ago! *Thanks to NetGalley & Button Poetry for the opportunity to read a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review. Lord of the Butterflies RELEASED NOVEMBER 27, 2018.*

  3. 4 out of 5

    Skirmish

    Book Reaction: http://neverhollowed.tumblr.com/tagge... Rating: 5 Stars - absolutely perfect I received a copy of Lord of Butterflies from Button Poetry via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Emma Scott

    that we are not truly alone in this that our veins are absolutely strings tied to other people’s kites, that our lives are that connected. That my butterflies are never gone. I don’t have anything better to say that the poet’s own words.

  5. 5 out of 5

    BadassCmd

    “Do you remember the first record Where we didn’t have to change the pronouns to sing along? We’d gone so many years without music that knew us.” I didn’t know any poem by Andrea Gibson before starting to read this collection, but I’m really happy I found this and got the chance to read it. The cover is also really beautiful, which adds to my urge to get the paperback and have collection on my shelf to skip through from time to time. I originally was interested in this because of the poems from the “Do you remember the first record Where we didn’t have to change the pronouns to sing along? We’d gone so many years without music that knew us.” I didn’t know any poem by Andrea Gibson before starting to read this collection, but I’m really happy I found this and got the chance to read it. The cover is also really beautiful, which adds to my urge to get the paperback and have collection on my shelf to skip through from time to time. I originally was interested in this because of the poems from the queer perspective. And I loved those poems, they were very heartfelt and tender in some ways but also raw and unapologetic. Especially ‘Orlando’ really got to me, made my heart beat faster and ache in sorrow. But this is definitely not ‘just’ a poetry collection about queerness, as one might think. There’s a variation of other subjects and issues made focus in the different poems that might or might not be related to the queer identity but can stand for themselves. There are very personal insights on therapy and suicidal thoughts and panic attacks, but also on politics, the Trump administration and more. “I got so low I had to look up To see rock bottom” I think this is a pretty well rounded collection and I’ll definitely read more of this author. ARC provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. [Review on Tumblr]

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kales

    I didn't believe Andrea's poetry could get any better but it has. I loved being able to read some of the poems they read allowed when I saw them live back in February. I heard the poems in their voice and could easily recall the performances like they were yesterday. This is a beautiful, heartbreaking collection with Andrea's signature style, wit, intelligence, and passion woven throughout. It is intoxicating and hard to put down -- save for those moments when you need a breather because you jus I didn't believe Andrea's poetry could get any better but it has. I loved being able to read some of the poems they read allowed when I saw them live back in February. I heard the poems in their voice and could easily recall the performances like they were yesterday. This is a beautiful, heartbreaking collection with Andrea's signature style, wit, intelligence, and passion woven throughout. It is intoxicating and hard to put down -- save for those moments when you need a breather because you just read a line and forgot how much of a punch the English language could pack when organized correctly. I'm also obsessed with the title of the collection. I know it is a nickname for Andrea from their girlfriend but I love the whole meaning behind it. I also love the tie in with butterflies, especially from one of the most memorable poems at the end of the collection. I cannot wait to see Andrea perform again in November when they come to Denver and this collection is released. It will kick you in the heart, and hold your breath hostage. Conclusion: Hating that I promised this copy to a friend already because I want to reread it and highlight it

  7. 4 out of 5

    Raven Black

    The ones without them as a main character are stronger, for my tastes, but all are relatable to someone

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Mifsud

    I have received an Advanced Review Copy from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. Andrea Gibson is a spoken-word poet and I was sceptical that text could capture the magic of epic performances—it does. Reflecting the nature of spoken-word poetry, most poems were longer than to what I’m used to reading in journals. It’s harder work to have a five-page poem (on Kindle) that is continuously, word by word, attention grabbing. In addition, Andrea has mastered the art of indentation and line-br I have received an Advanced Review Copy from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. Andrea Gibson is a spoken-word poet and I was sceptical that text could capture the magic of epic performances—it does. Reflecting the nature of spoken-word poetry, most poems were longer than to what I’m used to reading in journals. It’s harder work to have a five-page poem (on Kindle) that is continuously, word by word, attention grabbing. In addition, Andrea has mastered the art of indentation and line-breaks, each placed intentionally and adding meaning. (Side note: such indentation is even harder to pull off on e-books, but the copy sent to my Kindle was precisely formatted.) The poetry included several works on queer identity, personal relationships and mass shootings. From the first poem, I found myself highlighting verses because they’re the kind I’d want to read over and over again. In Orlando, which is a poem about queer safe spaces and the Pulse nightclub shooting, Andrea writes: “even life is like funeral practice: half of us already dead to our families before we die, half of us still on our knees trying to crawl into the family photo.” I could write a whole essay inspired by this verse, but still, the verse speaks best for itself. One thing I tend to do in reviews of poetry collections is mentioning my preferred piece. With Lord of the Butterflies, I realised this was going to be an impossible task. By the first third of the collection, I had marked the following: Photoshopping My Sister’s Mugshot, Ode to the Public Panic Attack, Gender in the Key of Lyme Disease. After that, I stopped noting down, for it felt pointless to provide an index list to all the poems. The raw honesty and vulnerability in the poetry made this collection an incredible experience. I was most touched by those pieces talking about her sister. I’m somewhat speechless, not having words in the English vocabulary that could explain; and perhaps the best way for me to convey this experience is to tell you: read Lord of the Butterflies. P.S. I’m listening to Andrea’s spoken-word album Hey Galaxy on Spotify while writing this review, and I’m beyond wowed—astonished of how well the poems are brought to life. If you haven’t heard of Andrea Gibson, do yourself a favour and look them up. Review was first published on my blog: https://poetrybyjeremy.wordpress.com/...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jessica | Booked J

    As a note, a copy of this novel was sent to me via NetGalley by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not effect my opinions in any way. Review also found here at Booked J. I know I've said it a hundred times over this year, last year, and several years before but: Lord of the Butterflies is a standout. Truly one of the best poetic releases of 2018. The thing that makes Lord of the Butterflies so poignant? Simple: Andrea Gibson. And Gibson's voice is very important to note. As a note, a copy of this novel was sent to me via NetGalley by the publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not effect my opinions in any way. Review also found here at Booked J. I know I've said it a hundred times over this year, last year, and several years before but: Lord of the Butterflies is a standout. Truly one of the best poetic releases of 2018. The thing that makes Lord of the Butterflies so poignant? Simple: Andrea Gibson. And Gibson's voice is very important to note. Because if there is one thing you should know about them before you read Lord of the Butterflies, it's that Gibson's prose has a presence that is potent and prone to getting under your skin in the way that only good poetry can. You'll feel. You'll cry. You'll smile. You'll be. Lord of the Butterflies treats you to any emotion imaginable. Which is to say: they know how to hit you right in the soul with their words and that's the sign of pure brilliance in poetry. Gibson takes you by your collar and leaves you reeling from their honesty. I was honestly dizzy with emotion the moment I finished this collection and then I did something I so rarely do upon finishing a book--I went back to the start and read it again. You can always tell when a poet is genuine in their words, and Gibson is at a certain point beyond genuine. You can't label their work, because it's in a league of its own. Right now, Gibson is someone you should be listening to. They are unforgettable as they come. I always find it so difficult to review poetry because poetry is all about feeling something and to try and review it? It's nearly impossible without breaking down every single line, from every single poem, and that would ruin the experience of reading Lord of the Butterflies for the first time. So here's what I will say: Lord of the Butterflies is a breathtaking exploration of Gibson. You don't want to miss this.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kirsten Tattersall

    I received a copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. "But heat rises for the same reason people rise-because they have to. I think the heat would like to rest sometime, don't you?" Before this book I had never heard any of Andrea Gibson's poetry but I feel I need to go back and read the rest of their works because this book was so emotionally effecting to me. I don't think there was a moment reading this collection that I wasn't crying or on the verge of tears. I loved th I received a copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. "But heat rises for the same reason people rise-because they have to. I think the heat would like to rest sometime, don't you?" Before this book I had never heard any of Andrea Gibson's poetry but I feel I need to go back and read the rest of their works because this book was so emotionally effecting to me. I don't think there was a moment reading this collection that I wasn't crying or on the verge of tears. I loved the mix of topics in this collection, no real rhyme or reason to how they seem to be arranged. It's exactly the kind of thing I love in a collection of poetry. “Do you remember the first record Where we didn’t have to change the pronouns to sing along? We’d gone so many years without music that knew us.”

  11. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    A collection of poems with very powerful messages and a gorgeous cover. I was first drawn to this book because it was tagged as LGBT poetry, but the collection touches on several other topics that are just as interesting and important. Some of the poems were not my cup of tea, but some were beautiful, thought-provoking, heartbreaking, and even difficult to read. *I received a free copy of this book in an exchange for an honest review.*

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anne Oftedahl

    The ARC of this book was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. There are so many amazing poems in this collection! "Orlando" made me cry, "Good Lights" made me feel things, and "Ode to the Public Panic Attack" was so relatable! Incredible imagery in most of the poems, and all of them manage to stir emotions with seemingly no effort. Only thing is that I tend to prefer shorter poems, and a lot of these were quite long, but the quality more than made up for it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    I guess not all poetry is for me. Some of these poems really hit me hard in the chest, a big punch in the feels, but some others, I just couldn't connect to them, especially for the longer ones. But they speak of something important, this constant battle around us, about us and it's something more people need to read/hear.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    It's official, Andrea Gibson is my favorite current poet. This book is just SO GOOD, so heartbreaking and lovely and angry and BRILLIANT. They are the real deal. *Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC, provided by the author and/or the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ronnie Stephens

    Andrea Gibson, author of Take Me With You and editor of We Will Be Shelter: Poems for Survival, continues to dominate the contemporary poetry scene with Lord of the Butterflies, a remarkable companion to Gibson’s most recent spoken word album, Hey Galaxy. The collection features several of the love poems which readers of the author’s work have come to expect, but its exploration of gender and identity is where Lord of the Butterflies shines brightest. Gibson walks the line between grief and hope Andrea Gibson, author of Take Me With You and editor of We Will Be Shelter: Poems for Survival, continues to dominate the contemporary poetry scene with Lord of the Butterflies, a remarkable companion to Gibson’s most recent spoken word album, Hey Galaxy. The collection features several of the love poems which readers of the author’s work have come to expect, but its exploration of gender and identity is where Lord of the Butterflies shines brightest. Gibson walks the line between grief and hope expertly, as only they can, giving readers a deeply layered, complex collection of poems that echo in the deepest parts of the body.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Big thank you to NetGalley for providing me with this excellent collection of poetry. I want to premise this by saying I was already familiar with Andrea Gibson's work and already found her poems appealing. However, I've never had the opportunity or urge to read a full collection until now, and I'm very glad I did because Lord of the Butterflies was an educational experience for me, in terms of how to write poetry well without it being incomprehensible to those who aren't seasoned poetry readers Big thank you to NetGalley for providing me with this excellent collection of poetry. I want to premise this by saying I was already familiar with Andrea Gibson's work and already found her poems appealing. However, I've never had the opportunity or urge to read a full collection until now, and I'm very glad I did because Lord of the Butterflies was an educational experience for me, in terms of how to write poetry well without it being incomprehensible to those who aren't seasoned poetry readers. What I mean by this is, Gibson's poetry is well done but not extremely ambiguous or complicated, like much of what I read and have studied in school. Poets like her represent a balance between popularity and quality. As I've mentioned before, most of the bestsellers one can find at chain stores like Target or Barnes and Noble are unbearable for readers who have actually learned how to write poetry, who write poetry in their spare time and get feedback on it or even study literature and/or creative writing. These works of poetry are simplistic, vague, unmusical, uncreative but unapologetic. These popular chapbooks--the R.H. Sin books, for example--contain many quotes one could find literally anywhere on social media and therefore lack originality. Andrea Gibson doesn't write this kind of poetry. Although her poetry is digestible and fairly mainstream, it is also experimental, clever and rhythmic. I can pick out many lines that felt entirely new to me and few that felt cliche. Although a couple poems sounded a bit too preachy for my taste, her point of view and the way she writes about her terrible experiences is powerful, meaningful and necessary. In general, as a poet this one has a ton of integrity--even if you don't think she has talent, you have to admit she has more integrity than many of writers who sell Instagram captions as poetry. The only thing I don't like about Gibson's work is her darkness; at times I find that she attempts to write an uplifting message, but regardless I don't feel uplifted. In fact, I often feel hopeless after reading her poems even if they aren't meant to make me feel this way.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Monika

    Lord of the Butterflies is described in the About the Author section as “a book of protests, panic attacks, and pride parades. These poems riot against gun violence, homophobia, and white supremacy, while jubilating gender expansion, queer love, and the will to stay alive.” It also says Gibson is “known for pulling hearts out of chests to either wrench or kiss”. Yes, hundred times over, yes. I’m quoting because I honestly couldn’t sum it up any better than that. Some of these poems make you want Lord of the Butterflies is described in the About the Author section as “a book of protests, panic attacks, and pride parades. These poems riot against gun violence, homophobia, and white supremacy, while jubilating gender expansion, queer love, and the will to stay alive.” It also says Gibson is “known for pulling hearts out of chests to either wrench or kiss”. Yes, hundred times over, yes. I’m quoting because I honestly couldn’t sum it up any better than that. Some of these poems make you want to stop reading and go share them with a friend, now. Others feel like private messages, meant just for you. Some need to be posted on billboards and played over the airwaves for all to see and hear. I thought it was interesting that “Until We Act” was placed right after “Dear Trump Voter”. I know people who refuse to keep up with what’s going on around us, claiming “it’s too hard” because they “care too much.” They practically boast about the fact that they don’t know what’s happening in the world. While “Dear Trump Voter” is a direct message to a very particular group of people, “Until We Act” serves as a pointed rallying cry to moderates and armchair liberals. That being said, having an open heart—for oneself and for others—and learning to open your heart, seems to be a common thread throughout this collection. Everything I felt about Gibson’s writing in Pole Dancing to Gospel Hymns holds true here: I love the descriptiveness, the rhythms and cadences, the statements! The writing is empowering and cathartic, even in the toughest of moments. Gibson's poetry is perfection, really and truly. But most importantly, Andrea Gibson makes me feel like poetry is for everyone to read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Renee Pinkston

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Poetry is perhaps one of the most significant forms of writing that I read.  Stories, for me, usually take time to develop and by the end, I usually have gotten the main point.  Why I love reading poetry collections is similar but more concise; poetry delivers a direct idea and then leaves me thinking about it more after I'm finished.  While stories are nice to read and a break from reality, poetry allows me to connect with something more directly.  For me, I know its good poetry when I read it Poetry is perhaps one of the most significant forms of writing that I read.  Stories, for me, usually take time to develop and by the end, I usually have gotten the main point.  Why I love reading poetry collections is similar but more concise; poetry delivers a direct idea and then leaves me thinking about it more after I'm finished.  While stories are nice to read and a break from reality, poetry allows me to connect with something more directly.  For me, I know its good poetry when I read it and it makes something in me click and I can't stop thinking about it.     Andrea Gibson's words were so true and raw and packed with emotion for me.  It's amazing to connect with a collection of poetry so much.  While reading it, I was so taken with them and the stories they crafts through their poetry that I immediately found them and Instagram and started following.  At times, some of the poems just create such a surge of emotion and pure feelings that I had to re-read them to make sure I didn't miss anything.  And sometimes, a poem just left me reeling at how close to home it seems and how affected by a written word that I could be.  Their work is so beautiful.  This collection of poetry delves artfully into relevant topics such as gender, identity, loss, and family issues.  Each poem is beautifully written and draws attention to these topics in ways that are so touching and personal.  I honestly cannot say enough about how perfect this collection is.  It's a five-star book, hands down.   

  19. 5 out of 5

    charlie shaw

    strangely, i'm finding that gibson's later work appeals less to me than their earlier collections, specifically the madness vase. perhaps it's a reflection of my own youth or immaturity. There are some lines which are more evocative of gibson's previous poetry: "Tell us again about goosebumps. Tell us again about pain " this entire poem stood out to me as evocative of 'i sing the body electric...' which made me more inclined towards it. gibson offers more love poems within this work: "Come tender a strangely, i'm finding that gibson's later work appeals less to me than their earlier collections, specifically the madness vase. perhaps it's a reflection of my own youth or immaturity. There are some lines which are more evocative of gibson's previous poetry: "Tell us again about goosebumps. Tell us again about pain " this entire poem stood out to me as evocative of 'i sing the body electric...' which made me more inclined towards it. gibson offers more love poems within this work: "Come tender as the trees / forgiving the books/ for asking to be made" while gibson succeeds with their many love poems, they also incorporates more politically charged pieces, which felt difficult to connect with, giving the reader only a few poetic gems: "in the dream / no one polled / the truth // no on polled / its teeth" the political pieces also suffered in their insensitivity towards jewish issues, especially in the wake of the pittsburg massacre. for those less aquanted with poetry or very interested in work about the current poltical climate, this book will likely be a success. personally, i will continue to prefer gibson's earlier work. "Your therapist says the shame is trying to take care of you. Says you blame yourself so you can believe the world is a safe place, or would be if only you had done things differently" [an e-arc of this book was provided to me by NetGalley]

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anisa

    Book obtained from NetGalley. Main topics: gender, america, love, suicide, self-love/self-acceptance. About the book itself: This is my first book by Andrea Gibson, and so, I had no previous knowledge of her writing style. It took me a couple of poems to really get into the book. I think this was because the poems are mixed: there is a poem on one topic, and then the next poem is about another topic. It might have been easier if the poems were organized by topic. The words used by the author are c Book obtained from NetGalley. Main topics: gender, america, love, suicide, self-love/self-acceptance. About the book itself: This is my first book by Andrea Gibson, and so, I had no previous knowledge of her writing style. It took me a couple of poems to really get into the book. I think this was because the poems are mixed: there is a poem on one topic, and then the next poem is about another topic. It might have been easier if the poems were organized by topic. The words used by the author are clear, and the poems have a nice flow and are easy to read even though the topics are far from superficial. About reading the book: Wow. This book fits in perfectly with what society is going through today. Several poems had me in tears, some brought a smile to my face and others made me stop and just stare blankly at the page. The descriptions of the author’s feelings as life happens around -as her sister spends time in jail, as her niece is growing up, as America deals with itself- are heartbreaking. The poems about love are sweet and realistic, but they are not sugar-coated, nor are the thoughts about self-acceptance. “What do you think about this weather?” is probably my favorite of this collection.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Danielle (Starry-Eyed Librarian)

    Disclaimer: I received a free Digital Advance Reader Copy (ARC) of Lord of the Butterflies from Button Poetry through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. My mother used to knit my mittens too big so they'd still fit me when I grew. I wore them and looked like who I wasn't yet. I feel that sometimes when I'm writing poems - like they don't yet fit. I've had mixed opinion on some of Andrea Gibson's past work. Their most recent book Take Me With You just didn't do it for me, but I've loved Disclaimer: I received a free Digital Advance Reader Copy (ARC) of Lord of the Butterflies from Button Poetry through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. My mother used to knit my mittens too big so they'd still fit me when I grew. I wore them and looked like who I wasn't yet. I feel that sometimes when I'm writing poems - like they don't yet fit. I've had mixed opinion on some of Andrea Gibson's past work. Their most recent book Take Me With You just didn't do it for me, but I've loved some of their past pieces so I decided to try this one out. I'm so glad I did! This book was full of emotional poems detailing Gibson's life and experiences with the world, as well as their reactions to recent tragedies. They touch on difficult topics like their response to their sister's addiction and the Pulse Nightclub Shooting. Their depiction of these events and how they shaped their life are absolutely heartbreaking and beautiful. Gibson also avoids the recent trend of insta-poetry (short poems with random spacing for The Aesthetic). Instead, these poems are long and thoughtful, a style that I personally love and appreciate in contemporary poetry. They also find a good balance between writing something interesting while still remaining relatable both in terms of emotion and actual phrasing. Reading this book felt like having an intimate conversation with a close friend. Gibson lets us into their world and shares both the dark and light in their life. And I really appreciated the vulnerability they showed here. I absolutely recommend this collection, but would suggest looking at the content warnings as they mention a lot of heavy topics. My favorite pieces from this collection are: Photoshopping My Sister's Mugshot, White Feminism [Noun], "What Do You Think About This Weather?", and Bad at Love. Content Warning for gun violence, death, addiction, mental illness (anxiety, depression), suicide, and references to self-harm.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lois (thecarrotstories)

    Thought provoking... Though I do not fully stand and support what the author writes, I admit that it is very thought provoking. Bringing issues about gender, America, politics, world peace, self love and many more, I could understand the thoughts from the author’s point of view. Since I could only relate to some of the poems, this book did not really speak to me and so it would be hard for me to comment much. I did enjoy those countering self love and social issues like panic attacks though. I thin Thought provoking... Though I do not fully stand and support what the author writes, I admit that it is very thought provoking. Bringing issues about gender, America, politics, world peace, self love and many more, I could understand the thoughts from the author’s point of view. Since I could only relate to some of the poems, this book did not really speak to me and so it would be hard for me to comment much. I did enjoy those countering self love and social issues like panic attacks though. I think this book will be much more appealing to the LGBTQ community as most of the poems were written in that perspective. Even so, I am grateful to experience this journey. Thank you Button Poetry for allowing me to review this book through NetGalley.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ramona Mead

    I expected to get through this 96 page collection in one sitting, instead it took four. The poems are so powerful and thought provoking, I had to take small bites and digest them fully before I could return for more. Gibson is obviously incredibly skilled with words and poetic form, yet it's much more than that at work here. Regardless of one's sexual orientation, love is love, and heartbreak is heartbreak-everyone knows it. Regardless of one's political views, when you're passionate about them, I expected to get through this 96 page collection in one sitting, instead it took four. The poems are so powerful and thought provoking, I had to take small bites and digest them fully before I could return for more. Gibson is obviously incredibly skilled with words and poetic form, yet it's much more than that at work here. Regardless of one's sexual orientation, love is love, and heartbreak is heartbreak-everyone knows it. Regardless of one's political views, when you're passionate about them, that's potent. These concepts are all universal, and she strikes each cord with vivid, carnal imagery, it's impossible to not feel overwhelmed with emotion. Many thanks to NetGalley for my advanced copy of this collection, in exchange for my honest review.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dora Yang

    Absolutely beautiful collection of poems by Andrea Gibson. I was originally interested in the book because of the interesting cover and the description of "queer poetry", and it totally exceeded my expectations (as I have not read Gibson's work before this). This collection of poems is so much more than just the queer perspective, its raw emotions and heartfelt voices create such a punch as I read it. Some of my favourite themes are America, self-acceptance/self-love, depression, romance. Truth k Absolutely beautiful collection of poems by Andrea Gibson. I was originally interested in the book because of the interesting cover and the description of "queer poetry", and it totally exceeded my expectations (as I have not read Gibson's work before this). This collection of poems is so much more than just the queer perspective, its raw emotions and heartfelt voices create such a punch as I read it. Some of my favourite themes are America, self-acceptance/self-love, depression, romance. Truth knows everybody's dark side / is daytime somewhere. Thanks to Netgalley and Button Poetry for allowing me to read the ARC!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Andrea Gibson has been my favorite poet for years, and I was anxiously awaiting this release. I was so happy to be approved for an ARC on netgalley. I absolutely was not in anyway disappointed. How incredible it is to read such raw and beautiful accounts of being queer, being chronically ill, being depressed, being in love, and all in one book. I expected to love this release but I didn't expect it to rock me to my core- there are many poems on the current state of our country that are so heartbr Andrea Gibson has been my favorite poet for years, and I was anxiously awaiting this release. I was so happy to be approved for an ARC on netgalley. I absolutely was not in anyway disappointed. How incredible it is to read such raw and beautiful accounts of being queer, being chronically ill, being depressed, being in love, and all in one book. I expected to love this release but I didn't expect it to rock me to my core- there are many poems on the current state of our country that are so heartbreaking and difficult to read, but they are poignant, well done, and necessary. If you like poetry even a little bit, please give Lord of the Butterflies your attention.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I received a copy of Lord of the Butterflies via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All words, thoughts, and opinions are my own God, I adore Andrea Gibson. They’re poetry is just so amazing and powerful, and always makes my heart feel so full. I don’t think I’ll ever be able to read ORLANDO without wanting to curl up and cry. DEAR TRUMP VOTER, is a super important piece and it hurt to read. On the other hand, FIGHT FOR LOVE is a wonderful love poem and I loved all the “definition” piece I received a copy of Lord of the Butterflies via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All words, thoughts, and opinions are my own God, I adore Andrea Gibson. They’re poetry is just so amazing and powerful, and always makes my heart feel so full. I don’t think I’ll ever be able to read ORLANDO without wanting to curl up and cry. DEAR TRUMP VOTER, is a super important piece and it hurt to read. On the other hand, FIGHT FOR LOVE is a wonderful love poem and I loved all the “definition” pieces for their shortness yet intense impact. Definitely a recommend!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    Passionate and powerful, this collection of poems is for anyone and everyone who feels confused by themselves or the world around them. With poems focusing on social issues, mental health, and sexuality, this collection put into words things that I think people, including me, struggle to find words for. Some poems were short, dictionary-like entries, while others were longer, but all of them hit hard, leaving me, the reader, nearly raw from the honesty and pure emotional value of them all. *I was Passionate and powerful, this collection of poems is for anyone and everyone who feels confused by themselves or the world around them. With poems focusing on social issues, mental health, and sexuality, this collection put into words things that I think people, including me, struggle to find words for. Some poems were short, dictionary-like entries, while others were longer, but all of them hit hard, leaving me, the reader, nearly raw from the honesty and pure emotional value of them all. *I was given this book as an e-book through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review*

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tatiera

    heart breaking poetry. This is my first time reading Andrea Gibson and I must say it was beautifull. Such a master piece... It's dificult to find words for such a incredible heart touching writing. If you are looking for poetry so intense that you can almost taste the anger, the sadness and the joy. this is your book. ORLANDO even life is like funeral practice: half of us already dead to our families before we die, half of us still on our knees trying to crawl. Do I recommend this book? I think that heart breaking poetry. This is my first time reading Andrea Gibson and I must say it was beautifull. Such a master piece... It's dificult to find words for such a incredible heart touching writing. If you are looking for poetry so intense that you can almost taste the anger, the sadness and the joy. this is your book. ORLANDO even life is like funeral practice: half of us already dead to our families before we die, half of us still on our knees trying to crawl. Do I recommend this book? I think that by now you should have read it

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chloe Natasha

    This is the first I've read of Andrea Gibson's work and I am honestly blown away by the delicacy of their words, along with the sheer honesty and rawness that radiates from each page. From politics, to gender, to social media, to sexuality, Gibson tackles numerous topics with such passion — Orlando especially broke my heart — and I absolutely look forward to reading more from this author! I cannot recommend this enough. With thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for granting me an ARC, in exchang This is the first I've read of Andrea Gibson's work and I am honestly blown away by the delicacy of their words, along with the sheer honesty and rawness that radiates from each page. From politics, to gender, to social media, to sexuality, Gibson tackles numerous topics with such passion — Orlando especially broke my heart — and I absolutely look forward to reading more from this author! I cannot recommend this enough. With thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for granting me an ARC, in exchange for an honest review.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Hira Chaudhary

    I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. These poems packed a punch and didn't ever hold back. I loved how true and honest and raw each and every one of these poems was and I loved reading this lovely collection of poetry. The only thing that has me docking stars is that the poems were longer than I'm used to, and sometimes the length would lose me along the way. Nothing against longer poems, I guess they just aren't for me, though.

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