kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Daughter of the Sun

Availability: Ready to download

Orsina of Melidrie is a paladin of the Order of the Sun, sworn to drive out corruption and chaos wherever she finds it. She has been ordered to leave her home and travel around Vesolda in search of a great evil she is supposedly destined to destroy. But after two years of fighting monsters and demons and evil gods, she does not seem to be any closer to her goal—or ever ret Orsina of Melidrie is a paladin of the Order of the Sun, sworn to drive out corruption and chaos wherever she finds it. She has been ordered to leave her home and travel around Vesolda in search of a great evil she is supposedly destined to destroy. But after two years of fighting monsters and demons and evil gods, she does not seem to be any closer to her goal—or ever returning home. Aelia is the Goddess of Caprice, the personification of poor decision-making. The Order of the Sun has classified her as a chaos goddess, meaning that her worship has been outlawed. During a run-in with Orsina, she is trapped in a mortal body, rendering her unable to leave Inthya. Aelia is found by Orsina again, but this time Orsina does not recognize her in her new body. So Aelia pretends to be a mortal woman who is fleeing an abusive family. Aelia plans to use Orsina as protection as she hunts down the magical relic that will free her from her mortal body. As Aelia and Orsina grow closer to one another, Aelia wrestles with her own desire to tell Orsina the truth about who she is, and her fear that Orsina will turn on her if she does. But the decision might not be hers after all, because their actions have not gone unnoticed by Aelia’s siblings. Cover Artist: Natasha Snow Category: Romance Genre: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Word Count: 71900 Book Length: Novel Sex Content: N/A Pairing: FF Orientation: Pansexual Identity: Cisgender


Compare
kode adsense disini

Orsina of Melidrie is a paladin of the Order of the Sun, sworn to drive out corruption and chaos wherever she finds it. She has been ordered to leave her home and travel around Vesolda in search of a great evil she is supposedly destined to destroy. But after two years of fighting monsters and demons and evil gods, she does not seem to be any closer to her goal—or ever ret Orsina of Melidrie is a paladin of the Order of the Sun, sworn to drive out corruption and chaos wherever she finds it. She has been ordered to leave her home and travel around Vesolda in search of a great evil she is supposedly destined to destroy. But after two years of fighting monsters and demons and evil gods, she does not seem to be any closer to her goal—or ever returning home. Aelia is the Goddess of Caprice, the personification of poor decision-making. The Order of the Sun has classified her as a chaos goddess, meaning that her worship has been outlawed. During a run-in with Orsina, she is trapped in a mortal body, rendering her unable to leave Inthya. Aelia is found by Orsina again, but this time Orsina does not recognize her in her new body. So Aelia pretends to be a mortal woman who is fleeing an abusive family. Aelia plans to use Orsina as protection as she hunts down the magical relic that will free her from her mortal body. As Aelia and Orsina grow closer to one another, Aelia wrestles with her own desire to tell Orsina the truth about who she is, and her fear that Orsina will turn on her if she does. But the decision might not be hers after all, because their actions have not gone unnoticed by Aelia’s siblings. Cover Artist: Natasha Snow Category: Romance Genre: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Word Count: 71900 Book Length: Novel Sex Content: N/A Pairing: FF Orientation: Pansexual Identity: Cisgender

30 review for Daughter of the Sun

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lex Kent

    I enjoyed this read. This is the second book in the Tales of Inthya series. I actually liked this better than the first book. As you might be able to guess by the series title Tales of Inthya, this book was quite different than the first with new characters. Also, this was an adult fantasy book, not YA like the first. Because of the differences, you could actually start the series here if you really wanted to. The two main characters are Orsina a Paladin warrior and Aelia a chaos goddess. A Palad I enjoyed this read. This is the second book in the Tales of Inthya series. I actually liked this better than the first book. As you might be able to guess by the series title Tales of Inthya, this book was quite different than the first with new characters. Also, this was an adult fantasy book, not YA like the first. Because of the differences, you could actually start the series here if you really wanted to. The two main characters are Orsina a Paladin warrior and Aelia a chaos goddess. A Paladin’s main job is to root out evil, demons and chaos gods and goddess. These two are sworn enemies, but while Aelia is able to keep her true self hidden from Orsina, she can’t help but fall for the honorable Paladin. But what will happen if her secret is discovered? This book dealt with more of the supernatural side of Inthya; lots of gods, goddesses, monsters and other beings. We had seen the importance that certain people placed on the gods in the first book, but it was a lot of fun actually getting to see them this time around. This book had this good mythological feeling that I had a lot of fun with. Calvin has a wonderful imagination. This book does take a little bit to get comfortable with. A lot of names and places had my head spinning a bit in the beginning. But don’t give up. Eventually everything seems to click and the book just turns into a lot of fun. There is another wlw romance in this book. It is very PG, but I thought it was sweet. I found myself really enjoying both characters; the innocence at times of a thousand year old goddess, and the brave warrior woman. I just really enjoyed them as a possible couple. This book also touched on a side story of another princess. I’m hoping the next book might jump a few years in the future and pick up on her story. It seems like it could be very exciting to say the least. I would also love to see Orsina and Aelia make an appearance. While I did like the first book, I thought it had some bumps. This book is not perfect either, but it was just more fun. I really enjoyed it and it makes me more excited about future books in this series. An ARC was given to me for a honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tara

    Well, this was a totally lovely surprise. A friend recommended I read it, even though fantasy isn't typically my thing, and I'm really glad I did. The story is interesting, the romance is very cute, but the absolute best element was Aelia's transformation. Well worth the time and now I'm excited to go back and read the first book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Myri

    Here’s hoping this his a sequel!!! But if it’s another story set in the same world I’d still be happy!!!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dannica Zulestin

    This is a good book! I mean, I kind of expected that bc The Queen of Ieflaria is one of my fave queer SFF books. But. This is a good book! First off, my favorite part of The Queen of Ieflaria was the fantasy religion, even though it was not central to the plot. Here, though, we get the gods of Inthya front and center. Aelia, one of the MCs, is a goddess herself (though a minor chaos deity), and Orsina, the other, is a paladin devoted to the sort-of head god, Iolar. And the majority of the plot rev This is a good book! I mean, I kind of expected that bc The Queen of Ieflaria is one of my fave queer SFF books. But. This is a good book! First off, my favorite part of The Queen of Ieflaria was the fantasy religion, even though it was not central to the plot. Here, though, we get the gods of Inthya front and center. Aelia, one of the MCs, is a goddess herself (though a minor chaos deity), and Orsina, the other, is a paladin devoted to the sort-of head god, Iolar. And the majority of the plot revolves around Orsina and Aelia running into various gods, fighting them or talking to them, etc. So we get to see a lot more of how the gods work in this world. Apparently this is a world where gods get power from their worshippers. I'm always kind of iffy on that, because shouldn't gods already be powerful in order to merit worshippers? but lols I still enjoy it as a plot device bc it basically means gods gain power thru influence, which is similar to how ppl get power in the real world, and it is a good reason for the gods to pay attention to worshippers and to be constantly fighting with each other for dominance. You see that here a lot, first with Aelia trying to get followers by putting them under thrall, later with the desperation of other chaos gods, and finally with the larger rivalries of Iolar with some of his more dangerous siblings. So that's all very cool. On the other hand, the idea that some gods are inherently chaotic is odd, especially since apparently their natures can change but generally don't. I dislike Iolar's policy of denying them worship and generally banning them from Inthya, and it's kind of annoying that apart from Aelia, none of the chaos gods we see in this book appear worthy of sympathy for their dilemma. Is Aelia just Not Like Other Chaos Deities? Is this because of her choices or because of something inherent about these other gods? Is there any chance that the other chaos gods can ever be redeemed or become better people? aaaaaagh, the questions. (I just really like hashing out how fantasy religions/magic systems work.) Aaaaaanyways. The other major element of the plot of this book is the relationship between Aelia and Orsina. I liked both characters very much separately: I love Orsina's devotion to Iolar (dutiful characters always do it for me) and I was equally fond of Aelia's impulsive but more or less good-natured character. I can see why they get along; they complement each other well, in an "opposites attract" kind of way. I was not shipping it as hard as I shipped Esofi and Adale, perhaps, but mostly because I think the romance is less central to this book than it was to The Queen of Ieflaria. Overall, a good book. I received an ARC through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    F.

    I loved this book - the second in the Tales of Inthya series. It is set in the same world as the first book, but in a different part of the world, and we don't meet any of the characters from the first book here. I am a bit sad about that, because I loved the first book and would have enjoyed catching up with them. Then again, we get another glimpse of this world and two brand new characters I absolutely fell in love with. I am hoping that their paths will cross at some point in the future. You I loved this book - the second in the Tales of Inthya series. It is set in the same world as the first book, but in a different part of the world, and we don't meet any of the characters from the first book here. I am a bit sad about that, because I loved the first book and would have enjoyed catching up with them. Then again, we get another glimpse of this world and two brand new characters I absolutely fell in love with. I am hoping that their paths will cross at some point in the future. You don't have to read the first book in the series. But there's no reason not to. Not since reading Terry Pratchett's Small Gods have I enjoyed the road trip of a deity and a mortal quite so much. Aelia is a 14 billion years old deity, but that age has brought her no wisdom or understanding of love, humanity, or happiness. She learns all these things on her journey with her sworn and mortal enemy Orsina, who is not aware of her true identity. Orsina is brave, noble, kind, caring, and has a great sense of dry humour. As Aelia falls in love with Orsina, we know that we/ they will have to overcome the whole hidden identity, sworn enemy, immortal and mortal points. Plus some rather irritating family on the deity's side. And if that wasn't enough, Orsina's heart belongs to someone else who does neither want it not deserve it. The other gods are not taking kindly to what Aelia is doing, and that doesn't bode well. Throw in some nasty demons, childish gods, fun fights along the way, and you have a great fantasy novel, in which the paladin serving the god of light looks a lot more noble than the god himself. The book has fun dialogue, great fights, conflicts that you know will have to happen (so no dumped in angst), and a really touching love story (which doesn't go beyond kissing). The whole series is set in the lovely world Calvin has created in which sexism and homophobia are just not a thing. I'm sorry to be leaving Inthya behind for now, and will definitely be back for book 3.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alexa

    I want this book SO MUCH. The Queen of Ieflaria was great and I can't wait to see the sequel!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Asha Hartland-Asbury

    This book is just delightful! If you like high fantasy, sweet f/f romance, gods learning to embrace their flaws, or just a really good road trip, then this is a must read! Daughter of the Sun is the second book in the Tales of Inthya series, but it works perfectly as a standalone (though it did make me instantly buy the first book once I’d finished!). The world-building is perfect, and straddles that line between intriguing and familiar – we have a fairly standard faux-medieval setting, but it ne This book is just delightful! If you like high fantasy, sweet f/f romance, gods learning to embrace their flaws, or just a really good road trip, then this is a must read! Daughter of the Sun is the second book in the Tales of Inthya series, but it works perfectly as a standalone (though it did make me instantly buy the first book once I’d finished!). The world-building is perfect, and straddles that line between intriguing and familiar – we have a fairly standard faux-medieval setting, but it never feels derivative, just comfortable. There are hundreds, perhaps thousands, of gods of varying importance, who have different (and sometimes very niche) domains, and they interfere with the mortal world as they please. Some are benevolent, and some belong to chaos – and this is where it starts to get interesting. Our two main characters are Orsina, a knight who is on a god-given quest to oust evil from the land. She’s doing a great job of the ousting, but she just doesn’t seem to be any closer to that one job that will complete her questing so she can return home. Then you have Aelia, a chaos goddess whom Orsina has defeated and trapped in a mortal body. To free herself, she’ll need to find one of her divine siblings – so she persuades Orsina, who doesn’t recognise her mortal form, to escort her on her road trip. Hijinks, as you may expect, ensue. Oh, and the two women seem to find each other very intriguing… Honestly, this kind of felt like a grown-up Tamora Pierce novel. You’ve got a great lady knight who learns to warm up emotionally, gods who are far too invested in the mortal plains, and a whole lot of adventure and excitement along the way. Even though this is the first time I’ve ever read it, it felt like a cozy old favourite within just a few pages. I absolutely loved the quiet, gradual way that Orsina and Aelia began to feel for each other – it’s as slow-burning as a short novel can be, and felt wholly natural. I loved every bit of their interactions, whether they were comforting, protecting, or simply irritating each other. The story itself is kept moving by the road-trip element of the plot, so there’s never time to get bored before the next episode of adventure begins. One thing that struck me about this book was the wonderful attitudes to gender and sexuality. It’s so refreshing to read a book where a relationship between people of any gender is perfectly acceptable – it means that none of the obstacles in Orsina and Aelia’s relationship is drawn from their both being women. This leaves so much more space for the actual relationship! It’s also fully accepted that there are more than two genders, with neutroi characters using ‘they/them’ pronouns throughout the book – and characters actually asking for and offering their pronoun choices! Gender is never assumed, despite appearances. (There also seems to be something called ‘The Change’, which allows a couple of any gender to reproduce – this wasn’t particularly relevant to this plot, so wasn’t explained in depth. I’d be interested to see if it pops up more in any other books in this series as it sounds interesting.) The acceptance and warmth in this book was just so lovely to read. There’s no agenda or struggle in the representation – everyone can just be. Actually, I think ‘warm’ is the word I would use to describe this book. It just made me feel warm and fuzzy inside. I need more books like this. Books with heart, that make me smile, that are full of hope – and also, that have magic and knights and everything else I love about fantasy fiction. You never see this in adult fantasy, where the trend has been that to be modern, it’s got to be dark and gritty. Daughter of the Sun is the opposite of grimdark, and I am HERE for it. I’ll be buying everything Effie Calvin ever writes. Give me fluffy, exciting fantasy forever! Five out of five cats!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I received a free review copy from NetGalley. This was really good! I enjoyed it quite a lot. I admit, I haven't yet read the first book in this series, though I do have a copy waiting for me (I accidentally thought this was the first book in the series). But this book very much felt like a stand-alone; at no point was I confused about the world the characters inhabited. + The Characters: The book primarily focuses on the two characters of Orsina and Aelia. I was especially drawn to Aelia, since I I received a free review copy from NetGalley. This was really good! I enjoyed it quite a lot. I admit, I haven't yet read the first book in this series, though I do have a copy waiting for me (I accidentally thought this was the first book in the series). But this book very much felt like a stand-alone; at no point was I confused about the world the characters inhabited. + The Characters: The book primarily focuses on the two characters of Orsina and Aelia. I was especially drawn to Aelia, since I found her personal journey to be the most interesting. Both Orsina and Aelia would fit right at home as heroines in a Tamora Pierce novel, which made them utterly delightful to me. + The Plot: The plot is rather straightforward, which, again, reminded me of Pierce's books. Orsina and Aelia meet and decide to travel together, though they both have their own goals in mind for the end of the journey. This isn't a particularly dark book; there's a bit of violence, but that's practically it. It's just a cute little story, light on the action, heavy on the fantasy and romance. I actually would have liked it to be a little longer, because it did feel like a lot was left unresolved ... + The Writing: Not much to say here (which is a good thing). It's technically sound, the different POVs are unique, and the story flowed nicely. The conversations felt natural. + The Romance: The crux of the story lies squarely on the developing romance between Orsina and Aelia, and it's truly a lovely thing to read. It's not rushed and it's structured with care. Although Aelia is a morally gray character, she still has strict boundaries for what she considers acceptable behavior. Despite her feelings for Orsina, she's still deceiving her; this causes her to worry deeply about the issues of trust and consent, and it was actually quite refreshing to read. (view spoiler)[Such as when Aelia refused to have sex with Orsina, knowing that Orsina would (probably) not willingly choose to sleep with her if she knew the truth. (hide spoiler)] + The Representation: There's a lot of it. Obviously, the plot focuses on the romance between two women, though in this world, queerness exists quite presently and is universally accepted. People of the same gender are allowed to get married and there's even a term for the non-binary people of this world. So yeah, it's good. All in all, this was a very fun and enjoyable read for me. To be honest, I was a bit disappointed when I finished this book and realized a) it was not actually the first in the series, and, b) that the third book won't be focused on Orsina/Aelia, because I just loved their romance so much and I want to find out what happened to them.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Colleen Corgel

    So, having read the first book of the series, and liked it, I was happily surprised when this second book showed up! Inthya is a really fun fantasy world that has the potential to be huge. This book is set in a different place on Inthya, following a wandering knight of the god of truth Iiola. Her name is Orsina, and she is almost ridiculously competent. So much so, that when she defeats a goddess of Chaos, named Aelia, she thinks she's seen the last of her. Aelia, despite her being the embodimen So, having read the first book of the series, and liked it, I was happily surprised when this second book showed up! Inthya is a really fun fantasy world that has the potential to be huge. This book is set in a different place on Inthya, following a wandering knight of the god of truth Iiola. Her name is Orsina, and she is almost ridiculously competent. So much so, that when she defeats a goddess of Chaos, named Aelia, she thinks she's seen the last of her. Aelia, despite her being the embodiment of poor decision making, is extremely clever and is able to trick Orsina into believing her to be gone for the time being. Aelia takes the form similar to Orsina's crush, and tricks her into believing she is a mortal running away from an abusive family. From there, Orsina and Aelia face off against more dangers that help bring them closer together. Unlike the first book, there's just enough exposition to understand the political and power dynamics in play, but it doesn't slow down the pacing. I think it also helps that most of the exposition is told through Aelia, who is quite the personality. She's flighty and shallow, entirely ignorant of the world of men - mostly because people don't worship her. But, even though she is the goddess of Caprice, she still has a good side to her (who said a chaotic being can't also be good). It also helps that Orsina is also just a plain old good person. Orsina could be a boring lead with her single mindedness, but when she meets Aelia, she gets to open up a little more and shows that she can be flexible with her mission. They're a great team, and it isn't a wonder why they'd start to fall for each other. Most of the conflict is from Aelia, as she had tricked and used Orsina at the beginning, but when she found out how fulfilling living with Orsina was, she slowly realizes that she can't keep her secret forever, especially with Orsina's faith. I liked that aspect of the book, as it did get to the heart of building a relationship on deceit without getting too far into angst territory. This is a huge improvement over the first book of the series. It gives you a new group of characters to enjoy- especially the gods, I like it when writer gives their pantheons personalities - to work with while setting up the potential for more stories within this universe. The magic is believable and consistent. With so few fantasy books in the lesfic sphere, I was hoping this could be a solid go to for my fantasy fix. This series is shaping up to being just that. I received this ARC from NineStar Press and Netgalley in exchange for my honest opinion

  10. 4 out of 5

    C.L. Ogilvie

    Orsina of Melidrie is a paladin of the Order of the Sun, divinely chosen to vanquish a great evil. Aelia is a chaos goddess, the personification of poor decision-making, whose worship has been outlawed by the Order. Trapped in Inthya and forced into hiding, Aelia convinces Orsina that she is a mortal woman fleeing her abusive family while she searches for the magical relic that will free her. But as Aelia and Orsina grow closer, an evil force is growing, one that threatens to destroy their bond Orsina of Melidrie is a paladin of the Order of the Sun, divinely chosen to vanquish a great evil. Aelia is a chaos goddess, the personification of poor decision-making, whose worship has been outlawed by the Order. Trapped in Inthya and forced into hiding, Aelia convinces Orsina that she is a mortal woman fleeing her abusive family while she searches for the magical relic that will free her. But as Aelia and Orsina grow closer, an evil force is growing, one that threatens to destroy their bond and change their fates forever. I loved this novel. I finished it in a single day. I had already read The Queen of Ieflaria, the first novel in the Tales of Inthya series, and Calvin’s follow-up definitely did not disappoint. Her playful prose and delightful romantic banter returns in full-force, as well as her skill for creating fully fleshed out characters and complex/morally grey situations. What’s most impressive is her ability to generate tension and conflict while still having her characters behave like mature adults. There’s a fun, slightly modern sense of humor that is very enjoyable without ever taking away from the fantasy elements or medieval setting. I loved how Orsina sense of duty and honor, and Aelia’s impulsive nature both complimented and challenged the other. A fun, sweet romance set in an impressively complex and expanding fantasy world. (I received a free ARC copy from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Stevens

    I know some were disappointed when they learned Daughter of the Sun was not a continuation of Esofi and Adale’s story, and instead an all new story set in the same universe. While I adore Esofi and Adale and would gladly read more of their story, I think I love Orsina and Aelia even more, particularly Aelia. Her struggles and growth felt very real to me. Daughter of the Sun delves deeper into the mythology that was just touched upon in The Queen of Ieflaria, and showcases how much world building I know some were disappointed when they learned Daughter of the Sun was not a continuation of Esofi and Adale’s story, and instead an all new story set in the same universe. While I adore Esofi and Adale and would gladly read more of their story, I think I love Orsina and Aelia even more, particularly Aelia. Her struggles and growth felt very real to me. Daughter of the Sun delves deeper into the mythology that was just touched upon in The Queen of Ieflaria, and showcases how much world building has gone into the series thus far. I would highly recommend Daughter of the Sun for anyone looking for more LGBT+ representation in the Fantasy genre. The series is very inclusive. ❤️🧡💛💚💙💜

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    What an utterly delightful romantic fantasy! A noble and honourable lady knight, sworn to defend humanity from chaos, ends up on an unwitting road trip w/an amoral chaos goddess disguised in human form. Of course, they fall in love along the way, which causes GREAT complications on both sides, & it is all so much fun to watch - like a 30s screwball romantic comedy in a high fantasy setting. <3 Totally delicious.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Reader Zero

    This book was a wonderful way to spend an afternoon. It is set in the same world as the first in the series, but isn’t a sequel. The world that was built in the first really came alive in this book so I am glad I read them in order. The pacing in the book is really great and towards the last 3rd I didn’t even want to put it down to eat I was so wrapped in how the story would resolve itself. Can’t wait for the next book!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    This book is a great example of anyone being capable of learning and growing. A fun journey despite the reasons for it and two ladies that just can't help but fall for eachother. Definitely worth a read especially if you enjoy adventure, a little intrigue, and lesbians.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bitterblue

    It was fun. I can't wait to read more stories in this series.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Very interesting story of a goddess finding love. Very interesting story. I just wish it was a little longer, but I look forward to the next book in the series.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lady_Starkov

    I did not realize that this was a sequel when I requested it. Regardless, the characters were new and followed Orsina (Paladin warrior) and Aelia (chaos goddess). A Paladin’s main job is to root out evil, demons and chaos gods and goddess. These two are sworn enemies, but while Aelia is able to keep her true self hidden from Orsina, she can’t help but fall for the Paladin. This book does take a little bit to get comfortable with. A lot of names and places had my head spinning a bit in the beginn I did not realize that this was a sequel when I requested it. Regardless, the characters were new and followed Orsina (Paladin warrior) and Aelia (chaos goddess). A Paladin’s main job is to root out evil, demons and chaos gods and goddess. These two are sworn enemies, but while Aelia is able to keep her true self hidden from Orsina, she can’t help but fall for the Paladin. This book does take a little bit to get comfortable with. A lot of names and places had my head spinning a bit in the beginning. But don’t give up. Eventually everything seems to click and the book just turns into a lot of fun. It is very PG, but I thought it was sweet. I found myself really enjoying both characters; the innocence at times of a thousand year old goddess, and the brave warrior woman.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Marta

  19. 5 out of 5

    JaimeL

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rahnuma Khan

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kari Marie

    I received a free copy from the publisher through NetGalley for an honest review. Disclaimer: I read this a month ago but holidays got in the way. This is the story of a woman, Orsina, who on a mission to destroy a great danger to her country but does not know what the danger is.. She destroys a minor chaos goddess, Aelia. Orsina later finds a woman and decides to help her unknowing that this is Aelia trapped in a mortal body. As the two travel together around the country will they find each other I received a free copy from the publisher through NetGalley for an honest review. Disclaimer: I read this a month ago but holidays got in the way. This is the story of a woman, Orsina, who on a mission to destroy a great danger to her country but does not know what the danger is.. She destroys a minor chaos goddess, Aelia. Orsina later finds a woman and decides to help her unknowing that this is Aelia trapped in a mortal body. As the two travel together around the country will they find each other or can they not overcome their differences. This is the second book in the series and I did not read the first book but I did not realize it at first. Feel free to dive in here. This was a different world sort of based on old mythologies like Egyptian myths as in that there are multiple gods and goddess who fight with eachother and all have a domain. This is a LGBTQ friendly novel but the description lets you know that. Interesting world but I did find Orsina annoying because she was so naïve about a past love. I did enjoy the growth in Aelia but even so this book did not have anything to really stand out. I give 3 stars for NetGalley because I maybe recommend it and 3 stars for Goodreads because it I liked.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adelina

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    I'm the lucky one who got to read an earlier draft of this, and it was awesome then - once I get the latest one, I'll do another read with all my excited thoughts! (PS - Aelia is awesome)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  25. 4 out of 5

    W B

  26. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin Yoo

  27. 5 out of 5

    cindy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Barron

  29. 4 out of 5

    audrey spoor

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.