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On the planet of Lobos, the Doctor halts a violent war between the native Loba and human colonists. Job done, the TARDIS crew departs – only for Ryan to discover he’s left his phone behind. Again. Upon returning, the Doctor finds that the TARDIS has slipped hundreds of years into the future – and that something has gone badly wrong. The Loba are now slaves, serving human ze On the planet of Lobos, the Doctor halts a violent war between the native Loba and human colonists. Job done, the TARDIS crew departs – only for Ryan to discover he’s left his phone behind. Again. Upon returning, the Doctor finds that the TARDIS has slipped hundreds of years into the future – and that something has gone badly wrong. The Loba are now slaves, serving human zealots who worship a godlike figure known as The Good Doctor. It's time for the Doctor to face up to the consequences of her last visit. With Lobos on the brink of catastrophe, will she be able to make things right? Featuring the Thirteenth Doctor, Yasmin, Ryan and Graham, as played by Jodie Whittaker, Mandip Gill, Tosin Cole and Bradley Walsh.


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On the planet of Lobos, the Doctor halts a violent war between the native Loba and human colonists. Job done, the TARDIS crew departs – only for Ryan to discover he’s left his phone behind. Again. Upon returning, the Doctor finds that the TARDIS has slipped hundreds of years into the future – and that something has gone badly wrong. The Loba are now slaves, serving human ze On the planet of Lobos, the Doctor halts a violent war between the native Loba and human colonists. Job done, the TARDIS crew departs – only for Ryan to discover he’s left his phone behind. Again. Upon returning, the Doctor finds that the TARDIS has slipped hundreds of years into the future – and that something has gone badly wrong. The Loba are now slaves, serving human zealots who worship a godlike figure known as The Good Doctor. It's time for the Doctor to face up to the consequences of her last visit. With Lobos on the brink of catastrophe, will she be able to make things right? Featuring the Thirteenth Doctor, Yasmin, Ryan and Graham, as played by Jodie Whittaker, Mandip Gill, Tosin Cole and Bradley Walsh.

30 review for Doctor Who: The Good Doctor

  1. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Robert Collins

    This the first outing in book form for The 13th because we have already had comments like the Tardis took us to other places before Rosa (a brilliant story ) this is easy to fit in. This is lot like Dodo in the William Hartnell's story The Ark in that Dodo sneezing changed history. In this we have Ryan leaving his phone behind on Lobas. Like Ark we have the Tardis moves in time yet plot comparison is very similar but Not lot people, except the hard core fans get it. Specially as the Ark was not This the first outing in book form for The 13th because we have already had comments like the Tardis took us to other places before Rosa (a brilliant story ) this is easy to fit in. This is lot like Dodo in the William Hartnell's story The Ark in that Dodo sneezing changed history. In this we have Ryan leaving his phone behind on Lobas. Like Ark we have the Tardis moves in time yet plot comparison is very similar but Not lot people, except the hard core fans get it. Specially as the Ark was not a popular story. It was more two different stories in one. This old saying of how dangerous time traveling is, or as Doctor McCoy in Star Trek knows the Prime Directive this Ryan 's Dodo moment. I knew some body would have to do the chase joke but Didn't exception it in the first pages of the first book. You will laugh out loud with 'dog' jokes lot Stewi Griffin & Brian From Family Guy & lot of sexist jokes. But The biggest joke is who the Good Doctor is. It isn't who you think. This Pointless read it to score no points.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    I’ve always enjoyed stories that explores the impact that The Doctor has on other people’s lives, the series has touched on it a few times. Returning to Lobos hundreds of years late, The Doctor soon realises just how much of an impact she has made from her previous visit. This is the first novel to feature the Thirteenth Doctor, I was really impressed on how Juno Dawson really captured the mannerisms of this crew. It must be really difficult to write a tie in novel to be realised soon after the ser I’ve always enjoyed stories that explores the impact that The Doctor has on other people’s lives, the series has touched on it a few times. Returning to Lobos hundreds of years late, The Doctor soon realises just how much of an impact she has made from her previous visit. This is the first novel to feature the Thirteenth Doctor, I was really impressed on how Juno Dawson really captured the mannerisms of this crew. It must be really difficult to write a tie in novel to be realised soon after the series aires. This really did feel like an extension to the TV series. A really engaging story that tackles the impact of religion on a culture. It’s a highly impressive Who debut by Dawson. I hope she gets a chance to write more novels for this TARDIS team.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bill Lynas

    Here is the first novel featuring the 13th Doctor, as played by Jodie Whittaker in the BBC TV series. There are a huge amount of Doctor Who novels and audio adventures and I have been reading them since the old Target novels from the 1970s. The problem is finding the few good ones among the vast amount of badly written ones. Having loved the first four new TV episodes featuring Jodie Whittaker I thought I would take a risk on this book. Did it pay off ? Well, it certainly started off well, with dec Here is the first novel featuring the 13th Doctor, as played by Jodie Whittaker in the BBC TV series. There are a huge amount of Doctor Who novels and audio adventures and I have been reading them since the old Target novels from the 1970s. The problem is finding the few good ones among the vast amount of badly written ones. Having loved the first four new TV episodes featuring Jodie Whittaker I thought I would take a risk on this book. Did it pay off ? Well, it certainly started off well, with decent characterisation of the Doctor and her new companions. This was no easy task when they have barely been established in the TV series yet. The plot is nicely handled, with the Doctor returning to a planet after a previous visit to find that her earlier interference has changed history -and not for the better! In some ways it is quite an old fashioned Who tale, with the Doctor and her companions being split up and facing difficulties separately. What I enjoyed most about the novel was the way Juno Dawson judged the humour perfectly and how it added to the story rather than retracted from it. This was her first Doctor Who novel-I hope it won't be her last.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael Cook

    With every new season of Doctor Who comes a new set of tie-in novels featuring the current Doctor. As season 11, the first season to feature Jodie Whittaker as the Thirteenth Doctor, just recently premiered, it's time for the tie-in books to be released. The first of these, The Good Doctor, was released October 26 and was written by the New-to-Who author, Juno Dawson. It's a novel that explores the impact the Doctor's visits can have on a world and how religions might spring forth from them. It' With every new season of Doctor Who comes a new set of tie-in novels featuring the current Doctor. As season 11, the first season to feature Jodie Whittaker as the Thirteenth Doctor, just recently premiered, it's time for the tie-in books to be released. The first of these, The Good Doctor, was released October 26 and was written by the New-to-Who author, Juno Dawson. It's a novel that explores the impact the Doctor's visits can have on a world and how religions might spring forth from them. It's a pretty darn good book. I love the idea of the Doctor inadvertently being the central figure of a religion. It only makes sense that someone who gets involved in the affairs of so many different civilizations would end up being a part of a religion or two. Former showrunner, Steven Moffat, briefly flirted with this idea during the Matt Smith Era (as it's hinted that the Doctor has become a legendary, mythological figure in lots of cultures and also basically ended up being a central figure in the creation of the Church of the Silence - a church literally created to make sure he never says his name to the Time Lords on Trenzalore), but there's never really been any meaningful exploration of the idea - in New-Who, at least - until now. Juno Dawson's novel is a remarkable exploration of how the Doctor's actions could influence a society to create a religion based around her, and then for that religion to get several facets of the Doctor completely wrong. I don't want to go into any real detail as to just how this religion gets these facets of the Doctor wrong, but let's just say that they get a lot of it pretty majorly wrong and that ends up fueling much of the conflict of the book. The other major part of the book is a pretty typical Doctor Who plotline where there are two groups of people with differing ideologies for how their society should be run fighting against each other and the Doctor has to step in and sort it all out. The Temple, the main religious rulers who were inspired by the Doctor's acts on the planet six hundred years earlier, is in charge and rule with a pretty big authoritarian fist while an underground group of rebels, made up of Lobos (anthropomorphic dog-like beings) and humans who don't agree with the Temple's rules, are plotting ways to take down the Temple and give equality to all beings of the planet. Naturally, the Doctor, Ryan, and Graham end up getting captured by the Temple while Yaz is captured by the rebels and this separation of our core group is what ultimately brings these two warring sides together in a climactic clash. Juno Dawson does a remarkable job at capturing the feel of Jodie Whittaker's Doctor and this new era of Doctor Who. This whole story feels like an episode we could see in this season and the Doctor and the companions all sound and feel exactly like they do in the series. Dawson perfectly captures and replicates the voices of the characters while also exploring and developing them some. We get a glimpse in this novel at how much Graham does care about Yaz, something we haven't really seen in the show as of yet. We get a sense that the four of them have been traveling for a while, so it's likely set some time after Arachnids in the UK. The novel trods along at a nice pace, never dawdling too much but also spending a good amount of time on each scene and allowing the story the room to breathe sometimes. I love the idea of the Doctor influencing a planet so much that they develop a religion around her. I love the idea of that planet's religion getting much of the Doctor fundamentally wrong. I love how Dawson explores this idea. I love how this horrible religion based around the Doctor has ended up being a terrible thing for many of the inhabitants of the planet. I love how the Doctor reacts to this religion and how it propels her through the novel to set things right. So much of this book was definitely great. My one complaint would be its length. I wish it was longer and had a bit more time to explore the Doctor's relationship to religion and show us more of how the idea of her being the central figure of a religion actually impacts her on an emotional level. That's a very small complaint, though, as these novels aren't designed to be all that long and the authors who write them just don't have the room in the novels to explore themes like this as much as I'd like. For what it's meant to be, this novel is great. It explores this central idea in a really interesting and impactful way. It captures the spirit of this new Doctor and her companions perfectly and it gives the audience a new, interesting story that feels right at home with what they're watching on TV. It's great reading for anyone who loves this new Doctor! 4.5 out of 5 wands

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cendaquenta

    3.5? Mayyybe 4? Might come back and alter rating later. Was good fun.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Doug

    This novel continues the current season of Doctor Who's examination of the "human factor" in the Doctor's travels, though while the television show seems to look largely at how the Doctor impacts her companions, this one is about literal god-building. There have been a few stories in the past that have dealt with the Doctor's mythologizing factor - The Face of Evil being perhaps the first, though it was a fairly common theme in the Eleventh Doctor years - but not many, if any, have focused on it This novel continues the current season of Doctor Who's examination of the "human factor" in the Doctor's travels, though while the television show seems to look largely at how the Doctor impacts her companions, this one is about literal god-building. There have been a few stories in the past that have dealt with the Doctor's mythologizing factor - The Face of Evil being perhaps the first, though it was a fairly common theme in the Eleventh Doctor years - but not many, if any, have focused on it quite so directly as here. The Doctor and her companions - Graham, Ryan, and Yaz - broker a peace treaty between human settlers and a canine-like species (the Loba) on a distant planet. When they return to that planet 600-years-later (a TARDIS-whoopsy just trying to get Ryan back his dropped cell-phone), they find the TARDIS (now known as the Tordis) and the "Good Doctor" have become central figures in a religion that is gripping the planet and driving the enslavement of the Loba and the punishment of heretics. Graham, a retired bus driver, is the one proclaimed to be the "Good Doctor" and a throwaway line about dogs being a man's best friend are cited as proof that Loba are meant to be human servants. From this point, the story progresses in much the way any Doctor Who story will: there are capturings and misunderstandings and bad people and good people and allies and enemies and scrambles through tunnels/sewers/hallways and chase scenes and cliffhangers. There is virtually nothing new from the action of the plot and either you like the handful of shapes that Who story takes or you don't, and if you don't, then you probably won't be picking this book up. However, the book's primary injection into the Whoniverse is a detailed focus on the question of, "What comes after?" How many times has the Doctor saved the day and left without a word? And how many times does that victory hold? Does that no-longer-doomed colony keep up the good work, that no-longer-doomed wo/man stay on the path of righteousness? The greatest fantasy of Who is that, more often than not, a single visit from the Doctor is enough to alter the course of history to the positive, but considering that the bulk of the Doctor's adventures have been on Earth (and the Terrestrial Disasopora), and that s/he has to keep coming back to save the day and right wrongs, clearly that is not the case. A colony barely surviving an invasion/plague/dictator is still going to have to hard-scrabble for maybe generations (and at least years) to fix all the damage done. Times of empty are a hard thing to overcome, even for the hopeful. Surely, some of those colonies turned to strong-but-amoral leaders or to barbarianism or to treaties with other potential invaders just to survive. This is general an important slice of Whovian philosophy. Juno Dawson is doing good work getting there. The flaw of her storytelling, perhaps, is two-fold. First, the religion of the "Good Doctor" tries not at all to be any different than Catholicism (blended with a few bits of other religions, but not too cleverly), especially the flavor Catholicism took a few centuries ago. This means, the main critique isn't necessarily on the Doctor and her general hubris and never-look-back attitude, her responsibility for violating the first rule of the Time Lords, but on a religious extremism: belief in a second coming and in Heaven and the religious justification of slavery and violence. These are things worth a poke and a prod and even an angry retort, sure, but it bruises the thoughtfulness of the tale by diluting it. By the time the Doctor faces her ghosts, the book only has a couple of pages to deal with the Doctor's feelings about this. It gets some points back by also critiquing the violence of the rebellion against the church, but the "easy" set-up of having virtually everyone be in the wrong and unable to help themselves without the Doctor's second intervention feels a bit of a cop-out. The second flaw is more minor, and that's the fact that very little of the religion is actually based on the Doctor and his/her mythos. Sure, there is the Tordis and the concept of flying through time and space, but outside of Graham's immensely misrepresented line, it is just old-school Catholicism created whole cloth and stapled around a couple of trappings. It would definitely been more "fun" had the religion been more a direct perversion of the Doctor's actions and words. Still, a good book and nice kick off of the new series of books. And it fits perfectly into the Chibnall era by hinting at other adventures unnamed (Moffat and Chibnall have both done a good job of seeding gaps in the storyline, of making us feel like we are only touching random bits of a much more epic story...and perhaps opening the door for Big Finish to come in). The companions are a little underdeveloped (as happens with novels written before the show even hits the screens) but that sometimes leads to us getting a slightly different take on them. Graham is a bit more...forceful, maybe...and the Doctor and Yazmin seem a bit more close. And to end this review on one of the highlights, let us take a look at the obvious element in the room. The religion of the Good Doctor is predicated on the Doctor being male, and holds that females are a weaker sex (and note, when the religion latches on to one of them being the Good Doctor, it is the older, white male and not the younger black man). While clearly this is a bit of irony and a shout out to Christianity's downplay of important females (in the Bible and beyond), it also makes a nice jab towards a lot of the pre-critique of Whitaker...that she is a pretender to the throne. Dawson directly attacks these claims with a very-nearly-fourth-wall-breaking section: "A woman?" "Indeed." "And how do you know she's lying? You said yourself the Good Doctor's return was foretold. Maybe the outward appearance -" "He would return as a man!"

  7. 4 out of 5

    Allen

    where everything you say takes it literally. The First Thirteenth Doctor Novel, and I enjoy very much. The Story is really well paced it didn't slow down nor sped up higher. The Doctor is such a cheerful Incarnation, She still has that Intimidating Nature. I would say this would be perfect for the Series 11 Episode.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tim Rideout

    Impressed by the breadth of this, the first novel to be published featuring Jodie Whittaker’s Doctor. Not only does it capture the new #TeamTARDIS perfectly, it engages deftly with big questions, including the nature of faith & religion.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Fantastic Alice Fox

    Right then! Bloody Brilliant In a mixture that starts with Sylvester McCoy, whirls into a soup reminiscent of angry indignant Tom and of course Jon Pertwee this is everything a new book should be. I constantly thought of the Killorans but in many ways I found that having a new race of dog folk worked better. And there's even a reference to a Big Finish story about Laika. I think Juno was the perfect person to tell a story like this. It gets into the complexity of prejudice on just about every leve Right then! Bloody Brilliant In a mixture that starts with Sylvester McCoy, whirls into a soup reminiscent of angry indignant Tom and of course Jon Pertwee this is everything a new book should be. I constantly thought of the Killorans but in many ways I found that having a new race of dog folk worked better. And there's even a reference to a Big Finish story about Laika. I think Juno was the perfect person to tell a story like this. It gets into the complexity of prejudice on just about every level and manages to tell a moving heartfelt story that shows you why the Doctor does not travel alone. What is equally amazing is that this is the Doctor. It's not a "female Doctor Who" She's just the Doctor. Indeed I find she reminds me the most of Jon Pertwee, who with his venusian Aikido and James Bonds style stories would likely be classed as a very masculine Doctor. But he had many a gentle side as well. There is something truly amazing about reading such a well developed character and recognizing the 13 other "hims" in her. It makes her far more accessible than a lot of other female action heroes and I don't care what anyone says I am tired of being forced to find myself in a male hero. There is a unique joy I feel when I find myself relating to a male character not because I have no choice but because there are woman and men I can choose from. I continually am drawn to Ryan Sinclair for this reason. For the first time I really feel like I have a place at the table. Both as the hero and as the companion. When there are multiple heroic men and women I am not desperately latching on to the one female character to find some way of relatin to the tale. I latch on to the person I have the most in common with. And it's often Ryan. I had my foot cutoff 4 years ago(it's been reattached, albeit without my ankle) and his dyspraxia is something I relate to. In "Class" I related to Ram for the same reasons. But in regards to the Doctor I see someone I can be. I've been a whovian since 1982 and have grown to love and appreciate every Doctor in their own way. But seeing someone like me as the Doctor and seeing her still be the same character makes her accessible in a way that most female heroes are not. She's not damseled, she's not written to be some uber female stereotype she is still written like the Doctor. The same Doctor who calmed the Monster of Peladon, the Doctor who almost drowned, the Doctor who wiped out their own people to save the universe, the Doctor who was helpless as countless companions and friends met fates that the Doctor could not always save them from. I also continually see classic Doctors in her. This book reminds me most of Sylvester and Jon and then there is something that's just distinctly Jodie as well. The characterisation is solid. The story itself, which also references 1963: Space Race(Big Finish) in a cheeky way is a solid piece of science fiction.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chris Wing

    This is the first Doctor Who novel to feature the 13th Doctor, as played on TV by Jodie Whittaker. I was quite looking forward to this one (as I usually am for Doctor Who books in general), but for a few reasons this time. Firstly, it's the first (full) in print appearance of a Doctor (which is always exciting!) and also, it's part of a batch where two thirds of the writers are women. I think it's nice that we're starting to get more female writers, especially timely considering the gender of this This is the first Doctor Who novel to feature the 13th Doctor, as played on TV by Jodie Whittaker. I was quite looking forward to this one (as I usually am for Doctor Who books in general), but for a few reasons this time. Firstly, it's the first (full) in print appearance of a Doctor (which is always exciting!) and also, it's part of a batch where two thirds of the writers are women. I think it's nice that we're starting to get more female writers, especially timely considering the gender of this regeneration. BBC Books have really made a big push celebrating women this year in Doctor Who and hopefully, this will be more of a 'new normal' as opposed to something that is appears a bit 'special', if that makes sense. So, in that sense, I'm not sure if it's a good or a bad thing that this book feels less than an occasion, or event, and more like business as usual. As it happens, I would give this more book a 3.5 stars, but I wished I could have given it more! So, let's get the elephant out in the open: This book starts off quite blatantly as a cross etween The Ark and The Aztecs. The blurb pretty much says as much. I guess th adage about 'no new ideas' is alive and well here... As the story continues, it veers away from both those ealrier stories, and it does raise the issue of the Doctor's gender being slightly more tricky a subject in worlds when there's a clear patriacrchy and women are second-rate citizens, but it doesn't really go into any detail, and just glosses over it. Is this a good thing or not? I'm not sure. Myself, I think it's a very interesting aspect that is, from time to time, going to be an extra barrier, like not having her sonic from time to time, or the 6th Doctor's coat. The other thing that struck me was that the notion of how it's fine that the Doctor is now female is quite strongly rammed home in a few places, by way of the baddies saying how the Good Doctor couldn't possibly be female and the Doctor rallying against it. Not sure if this was deliberate, but it felt a bit forced, really. But apart from these issues, I found it a really well paced and enjoyable read. The Doctor and companions were characterised very well (and pass the 'capture their voices' test). I found myself whizzing through it, so it really was quite unputdownable. So, yeah, I'm all for more stories from Juno Dawson.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Zack Khan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I wish this had been an actual episode. In Episode 3 of Season 11, Yazmin mentions that there are other places the TARDIS crew have landed before reaching Montgomery, Alabama. The Good Doctor, the first novel starring the Thirteen Doctor, nicely fits in that gap & really helps to develop the relationships between the characters. I enjoyed the story, even though it felt heavy handed with its message in a few areas, but handled it better than some of the episodes have. Having a more in-depth look I wish this had been an actual episode. In Episode 3 of Season 11, Yazmin mentions that there are other places the TARDIS crew have landed before reaching Montgomery, Alabama. The Good Doctor, the first novel starring the Thirteen Doctor, nicely fits in that gap & really helps to develop the relationships between the characters. I enjoyed the story, even though it felt heavy handed with its message in a few areas, but handled it better than some of the episodes have. Having a more in-depth look at religion was something nice to explore in Doctor Who, something that hasn’t been done much of in the show. Also exploring the idea of legacy was refreshing. Seeing The Doctor deal with the aftermath of her adventures was a very interesting route to take & I’m glad Juno Dawson took that route with Doctor Who, which, once again, tends not to do so that much. Overall, a fun, enjoyable & interesting read, which tackles some very heavy topics such as religion & slavery, with great moments pf characters having to deal with the situation around them, i.e. Seeing Bradley Walsh’s Graham react to being considered a God. Some relationships & character interactions would have been interesting to explore more of, like Tomos & Ryan. But overall, if you’re a fan of Doctor Who & especially Jodie Whittaker’s incarnation, then definitely recommend giving this book a try, as it definitely makes me want to read the other books that have come out.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jon Mackley

    A relatively easy read, this is the story of the 13th Doctor brokering a peace treaty between an indigenous population and the human settlers, but when she returns six centuries later, the doctor discovers that the natives have been enslaved and the humans have twisted the words of "the Good Doctor" to satisfy their own agenda. Like much of the new series, this story explores the idea of Empire, racism, sexism and prejudice. Throughout the metaphors are at best, thinly veiled and in many cases qu A relatively easy read, this is the story of the 13th Doctor brokering a peace treaty between an indigenous population and the human settlers, but when she returns six centuries later, the doctor discovers that the natives have been enslaved and the humans have twisted the words of "the Good Doctor" to satisfy their own agenda. Like much of the new series, this story explores the idea of Empire, racism, sexism and prejudice. Throughout the metaphors are at best, thinly veiled and in many cases quite overt. Sometimes the references to popular culture can be pretty jarring - Graham, apparently, looks like a game-show host. In all, it's a fun romp featuring the new doctor and her companions, but it's a by-the-numbers story that challenges prejudice in a way that isn't really challenging.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Luke Sims-Jenkins

    A slog. Stories about religious intolerance do little than to frustrate me so every time I put The Good Doctor down it was harder and harder to pick it back up. The saving graces were Dawson's wonderful characterization of the Doctor, Graham, Yaz and Ryan. Otherwise just pop the Arc into ya DVD player and watch that instead. Same kind of set up with the Doctor Steven and Dodo solving problems then turning up hundreds of years later to do the same again. Molten Heart was fun and quick, I'd pick th A slog. Stories about religious intolerance do little than to frustrate me so every time I put The Good Doctor down it was harder and harder to pick it back up. The saving graces were Dawson's wonderful characterization of the Doctor, Graham, Yaz and Ryan. Otherwise just pop the Arc into ya DVD player and watch that instead. Same kind of set up with the Doctor Steven and Dodo solving problems then turning up hundreds of years later to do the same again. Molten Heart was fun and quick, I'd pick that one up instead.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Fenny (wit.and.reading)

    3.5/5 I've had a small tradition going on for a while: whenever I'm really caught up in a TV show or a franchise, I'll read some of the "expanded universe" canon media, just to know a little bit more, and so far it's been a lot of fun! This book totally has some issues from a literary standpoint, but it was straight-up entertaining and fleshed out all of the characters really well, plus I got to see them a bit differently than on screen, so I'm pretty satisfied. I'm only wondering, why was it rel 3.5/5 I've had a small tradition going on for a while: whenever I'm really caught up in a TV show or a franchise, I'll read some of the "expanded universe" canon media, just to know a little bit more, and so far it's been a lot of fun! This book totally has some issues from a literary standpoint, but it was straight-up entertaining and fleshed out all of the characters really well, plus I got to see them a bit differently than on screen, so I'm pretty satisfied. I'm only wondering, why was it released so early in the season?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Garrett

    Does an excellent job of capturing 13 and her crew; but this is from someone who's only so far watched the 1st two episodes of our new Doctor. The plot is a bit of a re-hash of a First or Second Doctor story with a dodo, this one has dog people, slavery, patriarchy and some interesting religion-is-what-you-make-of-it elements, and that's fun. A quick read, goes down like an episode plus a little, which is what you want from these.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mel

    I have to say Juno didn't have the voices of the characters down as well as Una. But it was a wonderful plot and totally appropriate for the first novel of the 13th doctor. And like nearly all of thirteens stories I found myself tearing up at the end. Definitely recommended.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Domenico Sambuceto

    13th doctor story A story about the Jodie Whittaker’s doctor. Feels like the the sort of story we’d get in the show. Focuses on how religion and tradition can be used to oppress a group of people, and the doc teaches them just how wrong it is to oppress people.

  18. 5 out of 5

    David Rhodes

    The first novel to feature the new Tardis team and in this novel they are an established group who have been on multiple adventures together. This is no bad thing as it teases how they will be in the future TV episodes.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Smith

    Like a good episode Unfortunately, this story is an accurate satirical depiction of how people willfully misinterpret history and religion according to their own biases. It’s funny how obvious it is when it is a fictional world’s religion.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gruffen

    a good, fun read! (also bradley walsh is canon in the doctor who universe)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    Honestly. I love Thirteen so MUCH.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    An enjoyable read for a new Doctor. There are a few spelling/grammar mistakes throughout, and it's comparisons to real world ethnic struggles is a bit on the nose but it's fine nonetheless. :)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Josh Newhouse

    One of my favorite Doctor Who books as without an entrenched villain from the series... just a fun read with a message.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sally S

    I read this in one sitting! Great characterisation and a thought provoking storyline. I also liked the Doctor dealing with the consequences of her adventures :D

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lucy-May

    Rating: 4.5 I really wish I could read every book I pick up in one sitting like I did with the Good Doctor because it makes the stories so much better! Even if I hadn't read this in one sitting though I would've loved it. This novel tied in really well with the last episode of Doctor Who & has really helped to build up the character arcs of 13 & her companions. I massively recommend this. Extended Review: https://wp.me/p8MbIo-2E3

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lena

  27. 4 out of 5

    Zoë Margot

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joe

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey

  30. 4 out of 5

    Angela

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