kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Song of the Damned: A Musically-Inspired Mystery

Availability: Ready to download

A macabre liturgy. A mysterious carving. An intriguing 200-year-old mystery for music researcher Phineas Fox to solve. The headmistress of Cresacre Abbey School has asked Phineas Fox to establish whether an opera, to be performed as part of the school's bicentenary celebrations, plagiarises an earlier work. During the course of his investigations, Phin discovers that curi A macabre liturgy. A mysterious carving. An intriguing 200-year-old mystery for music researcher Phineas Fox to solve. The headmistress of Cresacre Abbey School has asked Phineas Fox to establish whether an opera, to be performed as part of the school's bicentenary celebrations, plagiarises an earlier work. During the course of his investigations, Phin discovers that curious legends about the school's past still linger, including the fate of a group of nuns who disappeared without trace more than 200 years before. What exactly happened to them? And who is the mysterious Ginevra, the shadowy figure whose true identity has never been known ...? As he delves further, Phin begins to unravel a series of interlocking secrets, each one more puzzling - and sinister - than the last.


Compare
kode adsense disini

A macabre liturgy. A mysterious carving. An intriguing 200-year-old mystery for music researcher Phineas Fox to solve. The headmistress of Cresacre Abbey School has asked Phineas Fox to establish whether an opera, to be performed as part of the school's bicentenary celebrations, plagiarises an earlier work. During the course of his investigations, Phin discovers that curi A macabre liturgy. A mysterious carving. An intriguing 200-year-old mystery for music researcher Phineas Fox to solve. The headmistress of Cresacre Abbey School has asked Phineas Fox to establish whether an opera, to be performed as part of the school's bicentenary celebrations, plagiarises an earlier work. During the course of his investigations, Phin discovers that curious legends about the school's past still linger, including the fate of a group of nuns who disappeared without trace more than 200 years before. What exactly happened to them? And who is the mysterious Ginevra, the shadowy figure whose true identity has never been known ...? As he delves further, Phin begins to unravel a series of interlocking secrets, each one more puzzling - and sinister - than the last.

47 review for Song of the Damned: A Musically-Inspired Mystery

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    This book is the latest in the Phineas Fox series from Sarah Raynes, where the stories all center on a mystery surrounding some aspect of music. Fox is a music researcher whose interests are broad and who is open to the “ghosts” of the past. In this outing, he accompanies a close friend, Arabella, on a visit to her old school. But his will be a working visit as he has been asked to assess an opera written by a former professor. And the school is known to be the center of an old mystery dating to This book is the latest in the Phineas Fox series from Sarah Raynes, where the stories all center on a mystery surrounding some aspect of music. Fox is a music researcher whose interests are broad and who is open to the “ghosts” of the past. In this outing, he accompanies a close friend, Arabella, on a visit to her old school. But his will be a working visit as he has been asked to assess an opera written by a former professor. And the school is known to be the center of an old mystery dating to the days of the French Revolution. What happened to the nuns of this house at the end of the 18th century? A touch of mystery makes the trip even more appealing. The story is told in more than one timeline . The distant past events occur in the late 18th c. in the area of the Convent and Chandos estate. Another past timeline occurs roughly 10 to 15 years in the past from the present day. While much of this was very effective story-telling, at times it felt to me that it went on just a bit too long in the distant past. The timelines/narratives did not seem as well integrated as in past books in the series. Raynes is really expert at bringing her plot points and characters together by the end of the book and she did this well here, throwing a touch of the gothic into the mix and keeping music central to the plot. My rating is 3.5*, not quite 4. A copy of this book was provided by the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    4 stars--I really liked it. This book is a combination mystery and gothic, with the tiniest dash of a possible haunting. My favorite genres in one! Every time I thought I had the plot figured out, it would twist and turn, leaving me frantically reading to find out what would happen next. It's almost a dual-timeline novel, but most of the plot set in the past is uncovered through letters, books, and diary entries. I enjoy epistolary novels so really enjoyed the format--and I especially liked the p 4 stars--I really liked it. This book is a combination mystery and gothic, with the tiniest dash of a possible haunting. My favorite genres in one! Every time I thought I had the plot figured out, it would twist and turn, leaving me frantically reading to find out what would happen next. It's almost a dual-timeline novel, but most of the plot set in the past is uncovered through letters, books, and diary entries. I enjoy epistolary novels so really enjoyed the format--and I especially liked the plot set in the past, involving a group of nuns who go mysteriously missing during the French Revolution. Part of Sarah Rayne's "Phineas Fox" series, this book contains a musical mystery (a really spooky one, in this case, about a death song). I enjoyed the characters and will pick up the other Fox books in the series. I can't believe it's taken me this long to read a Sarah Rayne novel. I intend to read more! I received this review copy from the publisher on NetGalley. Thanks for the opportunity to read and review; I appreciate it!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

    5 stars I read the Kindle edition. This book goes back and forth between the 1970’s and the present day, with a couple of side trips to a few years earlier than the present day. Phineas “Phin” Fox gets an invitation to the Cresacre Abby School to solve a rather thorny problem the two mistresses of the school are having. It seems the niece of one Gustav Tulliver named Olivia is holding the school’s scholarship program hostage in order to guarantee that the school will play her uncle’s opera titles 5 stars I read the Kindle edition. This book goes back and forth between the 1970’s and the present day, with a couple of side trips to a few years earlier than the present day. Phineas “Phin” Fox gets an invitation to the Cresacre Abby School to solve a rather thorny problem the two mistresses of the school are having. It seems the niece of one Gustav Tulliver named Olivia is holding the school’s scholarship program hostage in order to guarantee that the school will play her uncle’s opera titles “The Martyrs” at the school’s bicentenary celebrations. They are asking Phin to determine if the opera plagiarizes an earlier work. The music is very dark and almost torturous. Mr. Tulliver was asked to retire from his position as teacher and music instructor at the school. Also involved in the story is a group of nuns who used to live at the school when it was a convent back in the 1790’s. No one knows what happened to the nuns and there are several theories. Also questioned is the odd story of Ginevra. Was she real? Who was she? What happened to her? There is much background information given in this story. It is very interesting and very essential to the drama as illustrated in the book. This is an excellent novel. While there might be one or two typos, they do not detract from the flow of the words on the page. I rate this book right up there along with the two previous Sarah Rayne’s Phin Fox books. The book reaches a very satisfying conclusion. I want to thank NetGalley and Severn House for forwarding to me a copy of this great book for me to read, enjoy and review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alyson Rhodes

    ‘Song of the Damned’ is the latest psychological, supernatural historical thriller from the pen of Saran Rayne or perhaps she writes with a quill and ink, in an attic under owl-light- as she so convincingly recreates the settings and voices of different eras in her stories. This is the third novel starring music researcher Phineas Fox (isn’t that a fabulous name?) and as is often the case with Rayne’s plots, music, ancient, lost and cryptic, is an important thread which serves as a lasso holding ‘Song of the Damned’ is the latest psychological, supernatural historical thriller from the pen of Saran Rayne or perhaps she writes with a quill and ink, in an attic under owl-light- as she so convincingly recreates the settings and voices of different eras in her stories. This is the third novel starring music researcher Phineas Fox (isn’t that a fabulous name?) and as is often the case with Rayne’s plots, music, ancient, lost and cryptic, is an important thread which serves as a lasso holding together the past/present day narratives. For as always, the present day setting (in this case, a girls’ school, Cresacre Abbey) is the backdrop for past crimes committed, whose shadowy tentacles reach out to entrap the living. Rayne’s plots remind me of a set of Russian Dolls, so detailed in their execution, and each one when removed, revealing another precise tinier figure inside. You really have to keep up with the plot clues, the differing voices (often heard in diaries or letters) and the historical narrative switching. Take your readerly eye off the ball and you lose the thread; you’ve got to be at Theseus finding his way out of the labyrinth. Minotaurs abound in Rayne’s novels. I’m a huge fan of her thrillers, and have read them all, see Sarah’s blog http://www.sarahrayne.co.uk/ for a full list and the different pen names she has written under. Sarah is adept at ratcheting up the tension, and giving hints that all is not well – you start in the present and travel back to the C18th to when the school was a nunnery and via diary entries to France, just prior to the butchery of the French Revolution (which is given a larger role later on) in a touching scene at the Guillotine itself. Rayne is expert at capturing the nuances of the different historical periods, through language, clothing, food, and in this novel, the use of music. I suspect she is a whizz at research- for all her novels are rich in such details; much of the plot in ‘Song of the Damned’ revolves around the ancient practice of immurement (literally:- walliing-in alive) and Phineas begins to discover that this grisly ritual has not died out. The scenes set in Infanger Cottage, owned by a remnant of the Tulliver family, Olivia (a brilliant depiction by Rayne of an odd, isolated and ultimately tragic individual), are for me, the most disturbing, sinister and menacing of the whole novel. The denouement with Phin’s girlfriend, Arabella Tallis and Olivia, is a model in how to writing creeping terror brilliantly. You just want to shout, ‘Watch out, don’t go down the cellar stairs!’ There is a hefty amount of plot, minor and major, going on in this novel, with revelations scattered liberally along the way; literally never a quiet moment. Who is Ginevra? Where is the missing opera? Where and why and how did the nuns vanish to in the 1790’s? Why won’t Olivia sell Infanger cottage? The questions continue. To find out the answers and the full solution to this tricky, elaborate and clever puzzle-box of a novel- well I would strongly advise buying the book and sitting down for a weekend and only come up for a coffee.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Helen Carolan

    Another excellent read in the Phineas Fox series. Here the music historian is asked to take a look at an opera written by a music teacher at a boarding school. His niece wishes for the opera to be performed but the school are worried he may have used pieces from other opera's. While researching Phineas discovers strange music within the opera which may be ancient and was preformed in ancient times when nuns were walled up for sexual transgressions. Added to the mysterious disappearance of a grou Another excellent read in the Phineas Fox series. Here the music historian is asked to take a look at an opera written by a music teacher at a boarding school. His niece wishes for the opera to be performed but the school are worried he may have used pieces from other opera's. While researching Phineas discovers strange music within the opera which may be ancient and was preformed in ancient times when nuns were walled up for sexual transgressions. Added to the mysterious disappearance of a group of nuns during the French revolution and Fox has his hands full.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lizzie Hayes

    This is the third book in the series featuring Phineas Fox, a professional music researcher. Phinn is surprised and pleased to receive a letter from Harriet Madely, the headmistress of Cresacre Abbey School making flattering reference to Phinn’s work and recent book, and who hopes he might be able to help her with a rather delicate and unusual matter in relation to their bicentenary celebration’s. However, mention of the irrepressible Arabella Tallis reminds him that she had off-handily mentione This is the third book in the series featuring Phineas Fox, a professional music researcher. Phinn is surprised and pleased to receive a letter from Harriet Madely, the headmistress of Cresacre Abbey School making flattering reference to Phinn’s work and recent book, and who hopes he might be able to help her with a rather delicate and unusual matter in relation to their bicentenary celebration’s. However, mention of the irrepressible Arabella Tallis reminds him that she had off-handily mentioned a couple of events she would like him to accompany her to that called for black tie and dinner jacket, and all became clear. Mention of a fee rather clinched the matter as Phinn’s quarterly service charge was due. The request is of course not that straight forward. Historically a member of the Tulliver family is entitled to a seat on the school board. The current Tulliver is Olivia who sees it as her life’s work to get an opera written by her uncle Gustav included in the bicentenary programme. None of the other members agree, but Olivia is implying that if her request is not granted the funds for the Tulliver Scholarship may be reduced. All Phinn has to do is assess the opera, and as Phinn’s is highly regarded in his field, convince Olivia that it’s not a good idea. Well as Phinn discovers it has already been turned down by everyone of note – so simple. Then we meet Olivia who is definitely on the odd side and who still lives at Infanger Cottage, inherited from her uncle, a strange and eerie place only accessible along a narrow footpath that is both dark and gloomy and to which sunlight never reaches – so maybe not so simple! Phinn is immediately fascinated by the school’s former incarnation and the odd legends relating to a group of nuns who disappeared over night more than 200 years ago. What happened to them has never been discovered and many myths have grown up as to their fate. On a visit to the old church Phinn sees a carving that disturbs him greatly as it depicts a macabre ritual. The modern narration is interspersed with diary extracts from the 1790’s by a first-person unnamed narrator. And so, as Phinn delves into the history so slowly the plight of the missing nuns is revealed. But there are more sinister secrets closer to home to be discovered. And who was Ginevra, a shadowy figure about whom legend abounds? Dark and atmospheric in this intriguing story there is mystery upon mystery. Although a sinister spine-chilling tale of medieval rituals, there are some wonderful light-hearted touches, and some marvellously well-developed characters. I loved it. And it is of course highly recommended. ------ Reviewer: Lizzie Sirett

  7. 4 out of 5

    Debra

    I have read several books in the Phineas Fox series and found them all to be good reads. This book is no exception. Phin is invited by the headmistress of Cresacre School to investiagte an opera which has been put forward by a school patron for performance. There are concerns over its quality and possible plagarism. Phin finds that there is a lot more to this piece of music than meets the eye and finds mysteries in the school's distant and not so distant past. This is a well structured and well wr I have read several books in the Phineas Fox series and found them all to be good reads. This book is no exception. Phin is invited by the headmistress of Cresacre School to investiagte an opera which has been put forward by a school patron for performance. There are concerns over its quality and possible plagarism. Phin finds that there is a lot more to this piece of music than meets the eye and finds mysteries in the school's distant and not so distant past. This is a well structured and well written book which sits on the lighter side of the detective genre of books. It is fascinating as well as being light and easy to read. The plot is well constructed but doesn't have the intensity or complex plot twists of the deeper detective or murder/mystery books. This is not a complaint but merely explained to help people understand where this sits in the genre. Alsough there are several books in this series it is not essential to read them all in order. Any of them could be read as a stand alone book. Phin does have a "friend" Arabella who is included in the book but it is very easy to pick up where their relationship is at without having read the previous work. This isn't integral to the plot but does provide an extra element. The characters in this book are not exceptionally complex. However the character of Olivia deserves a special mention as I felt that she was particularly well written. This book is written in two time periods. The present day & the past of 200 years previously. The past is seen through various letters, diaries and documents - a plot device which I like. The book does concentrate more on the past than the present to such a point that I wondered if it would have been a good stand alone book without the modern day inclusion of Phin. A good solid read. Not exceptionally gruesome but perhaps not the ideal book for those with extreme claustophobia! I received a free copy of this book via Netgalley.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Hannelore Cheney

    Thank you NetGalley and Severn House for the eARC. Phineas Fox and his friend Arabella are visiting Cresacre Abbey School after Phin was contacted by the headmistress to help research an opera,The Martyrs, which they may be forced to stage at the Bicentennial celebrations of the school. The niece of a former headmaster, living in a cottage he left her nearby, is determined it should be performed or, as a member of the school's board, she will vote to cut their scholarship fund. Perusing the manusc Thank you NetGalley and Severn House for the eARC. Phineas Fox and his friend Arabella are visiting Cresacre Abbey School after Phin was contacted by the headmistress to help research an opera,The Martyrs, which they may be forced to stage at the Bicentennial celebrations of the school. The niece of a former headmaster, living in a cottage he left her nearby, is determined it should be performed or, as a member of the school's board, she will vote to cut their scholarship fund. Perusing the manuscript he's not impressed, it's discordant and reminds him of other works, but it kindles his curiosity. The mysteries of a woman called Ginevra and the collective disappearances of the nuns at the nearby Abbey 200 years ago are still whispered about and ominous carvings leave Phin uneasy, but very curious to delve into them. It seems the carvings depict an ancient practice called the Lemurrer, where a sinner was bricked up alive. I must say that the descriptions of the practice made me very uncomfortable and I was happy to read about the antics of Arabella to lighten my mood! This is a good 3rd in the series, perhaps a little darker than the previous 2, it gave me goosebumps at times, but that made it more of a page turner. An enjoyable, gothic read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Romero

    Phineas Fox is one of my favorite characters, as is the lovely Arabella. When Phin is asked to authenticate an opera by the head of Cresacre Abbey School, Arabella is excited as she was once a student there and has heard all of the theories of the missing nuns. The more Phin digs into the opera and the men who wrote it, he finds that the events that happened centuries ago may still be deadly today. As Arabella tries to visit one of her old classmates, Olivia Tolliver, she feels something is off. W Phineas Fox is one of my favorite characters, as is the lovely Arabella. When Phin is asked to authenticate an opera by the head of Cresacre Abbey School, Arabella is excited as she was once a student there and has heard all of the theories of the missing nuns. The more Phin digs into the opera and the men who wrote it, he finds that the events that happened centuries ago may still be deadly today. As Arabella tries to visit one of her old classmates, Olivia Tolliver, she feels something is off. Why has Olivia become reclusive and maybe a bit nuts? Does it have anything to do with what is hidden in the basement? This was told in present time as well as the 1790's through the diaries of a Sister Cecilia, one of the nuns who supposedly disappeared and a man who is a mystery to all of them. Historical Mystery Fiction or whatever genre you would like to put on this one, this author never disappoints. I would highly recommend this one! Netgalley Reviews/ November 1st 2018 by Severn House Publishers

  10. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    Song of the Damned is the third in the Phineas Fox series. Fox was introduced in Death Note, the first book in the series, which was then followed by Chord of Evil. This is my first foray in the Phineas Fox series. I have, however, read a few of Sarah Rayne's Haunted House books. The books I have read I thoroughly enjoyed. She does a sensational job of melding the mysteries of the past and present day without completely confounding the reader. Typically, the secrets are reviled along with some gr Song of the Damned is the third in the Phineas Fox series. Fox was introduced in Death Note, the first book in the series, which was then followed by Chord of Evil. This is my first foray in the Phineas Fox series. I have, however, read a few of Sarah Rayne's Haunted House books. The books I have read I thoroughly enjoyed. She does a sensational job of melding the mysteries of the past and present day without completely confounding the reader. Typically, the secrets are reviled along with some great supernatural heebie jeebies. Both series follow the jumping timeline to solve whatever mystery is placed in front of the reader. Little bits and pieces are carefully doled out in such a way that the reader feels they are solving the mystery alongside the MC. Song of the Damned is no exception. Read more at Cats Luv Coffee

  11. 4 out of 5

    Leeanne

    A Phineas Fox Mystery. Phineas Fox is a music historian and researcher. He was asked to visit Cresacre School and help authenticate an Opera that was written by Gustav Tulliver. As well as investigating the opera Phineas also investigated an old mystery about the Creasacre Convent that was previously the site of the Creasacre school and the disappearance of a group of nuns in 1790’s. This is a psychological murder mystery. About the Chandos family that previously owned the land where Cresacre Scho A Phineas Fox Mystery. Phineas Fox is a music historian and researcher. He was asked to visit Cresacre School and help authenticate an Opera that was written by Gustav Tulliver. As well as investigating the opera Phineas also investigated an old mystery about the Creasacre Convent that was previously the site of the Creasacre school and the disappearance of a group of nuns in 1790’s. This is a psychological murder mystery. About the Chandos family that previously owned the land where Cresacre School is located, the Convent at Creascre and an old cottage in the grounds of Creasacre School. An old diary reveals some of the history of the Chandos family. It is set mostly in the present time and 1790’s.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Gray

    A unique dual time line mystery that switches between the 1790s, when a group of nuns disappeared, and the present, when Phin Fox is investigating the authenticity of an opera. Not the usual, that's for sure. There's creepy stuff at Cresacre Abbey, now a school for girls. No spoilers but keep a protective eye on Phin's friend Arabella. There's more going on at this school than meets the eye. Thanks to Netgalley for the arc. This is twisty, dark, unusual, and a rewarding read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emma

  14. 4 out of 5

    Annarella

    What a wonderful dark and enjoyable read! The book is entertaining, atmospheric at part, and enthralling. I loved the dual timeline as well as the characters. The plot was full of twist and turns, never a boring moment, and kept me hooked till the last page. I look forward to reading other books by this writer. Highly recommended! Many thanks to Severn House and Netgalley for this ARC

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

  16. 4 out of 5

    Hayley Olsen

  17. 5 out of 5

    cheryl horne

  18. 5 out of 5

    Greg

  19. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Uttaro

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shelly

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael Blount

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alice

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cristie Underwood

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Mensing

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gemma

  27. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tammie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sarrah Deets

  30. 4 out of 5

    Anna Richey

  31. 5 out of 5

    Leslee

  32. 5 out of 5

    H

  33. 5 out of 5

    Penny Duhamel

  34. 4 out of 5

    Emma Shaw

  35. 5 out of 5

    Neer

  36. 5 out of 5

    Amanda McGeary

  37. 5 out of 5

    Sandra

  38. 5 out of 5

    Linda Kelly

  39. 5 out of 5

    Klaudia

  40. 5 out of 5

    Lizzy

  41. 5 out of 5

    Kim

  42. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  43. 5 out of 5

    Carlos

  44. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Sweeney

  45. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  46. 4 out of 5

    Donna

  47. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.