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Abraham Lincoln

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America was at a crossroads in 1939 as they debated whether to join the Allies in their battle against Hitler's relentless march across Europe. As European immigrants the d'Aulaires felt keenly the importance of standing against injustice, and saw in Lincoln the archetypal American hero as he stood against the injustice of slavery. It was this spirit they hoped to exemplif America was at a crossroads in 1939 as they debated whether to join the Allies in their battle against Hitler's relentless march across Europe. As European immigrants the d'Aulaires felt keenly the importance of standing against injustice, and saw in Lincoln the archetypal American hero as he stood against the injustice of slavery. It was this spirit they hoped to exemplify in their biography of young Abe as he grew into manhood against the backdrop of the wilderness of Kentucky, the deep woods of Indiana, and the prairies of Illinois. Camping for weeks in Lincoln country, the d'Aulaires imbibed the spirit of the man Lincoln as well as his humor and good will. From his days as a clerk, teaching himself law reading Blackstone, practicing law in Springfield, running unsuccessfully for office, debating Stephen Douglas over the issue of slavery, and ultimately becoming President of the United States, the d'Aulaires have written and beautifully illustrated the life of one of America's most remarkable citizens. This book was awarded the Caldecott Medal in 1940.


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America was at a crossroads in 1939 as they debated whether to join the Allies in their battle against Hitler's relentless march across Europe. As European immigrants the d'Aulaires felt keenly the importance of standing against injustice, and saw in Lincoln the archetypal American hero as he stood against the injustice of slavery. It was this spirit they hoped to exemplif America was at a crossroads in 1939 as they debated whether to join the Allies in their battle against Hitler's relentless march across Europe. As European immigrants the d'Aulaires felt keenly the importance of standing against injustice, and saw in Lincoln the archetypal American hero as he stood against the injustice of slavery. It was this spirit they hoped to exemplify in their biography of young Abe as he grew into manhood against the backdrop of the wilderness of Kentucky, the deep woods of Indiana, and the prairies of Illinois. Camping for weeks in Lincoln country, the d'Aulaires imbibed the spirit of the man Lincoln as well as his humor and good will. From his days as a clerk, teaching himself law reading Blackstone, practicing law in Springfield, running unsuccessfully for office, debating Stephen Douglas over the issue of slavery, and ultimately becoming President of the United States, the d'Aulaires have written and beautifully illustrated the life of one of America's most remarkable citizens. This book was awarded the Caldecott Medal in 1940.

30 review for Abraham Lincoln

  1. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    I think the art in this book is good, nice colors. It is warm and rich. I think there is too much story here and it should have been made into a regular bedtime story. There is a whole page of text next to a picture. It is a long read. Much too long for a bedtime story. I read this to the kids and we needed to bookmark our place and go to bed as it was taking so long. Both kids did not want to continue the story and asked to simply Not finish. I finished the story, but the kids did not. It took v I think the art in this book is good, nice colors. It is warm and rich. I think there is too much story here and it should have been made into a regular bedtime story. There is a whole page of text next to a picture. It is a long read. Much too long for a bedtime story. I read this to the kids and we needed to bookmark our place and go to bed as it was taking so long. Both kids did not want to continue the story and asked to simply Not finish. I finished the story, but the kids did not. It took very complex issues of that time and made a sweeping simple statement about them. I don't think they did a good job picking parts of the story. The parts of Abe's childhood are good and it should have focused solely on that part for the whole book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Book Concierge

    This Caldecott-winner is a biography for young children. There is a fair amount of text, but also many detailed illustrations. It follows Lincoln from his birth to the end of the Civil War, though it does not mention his assassination. I like the focus on his early life; he is shown to have a strong work ethic and a great desire to learn. There are several scenes depicting his efforts to get educated, including reading on his own. He is depicted as a man of strong moral courage, as well as a lov This Caldecott-winner is a biography for young children. There is a fair amount of text, but also many detailed illustrations. It follows Lincoln from his birth to the end of the Civil War, though it does not mention his assassination. I like the focus on his early life; he is shown to have a strong work ethic and a great desire to learn. There are several scenes depicting his efforts to get educated, including reading on his own. He is depicted as a man of strong moral courage, as well as a loving father. If I have any complaint, it is the depiction of the Blacks and Indians. I understand that this was first published in 1939, but I cringed at those illustrations. The d’Aulaires were immigrants to America, and when the book was written the world was anxiously watching the events in Germany that would lead to a world war. They may have erred on the side of hero-worship in their portrayal of Lincoln, but I like that they portrayed a man willing to stand up against injustice. All told, it’s a fine introduction to American history and particularly to the life of possibly the best President this nation has ever had.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah W

    The pictures are the most enjoyable part of this book about Lincoln and why I'm giving this book two stars instead of one. My favorite picture came on page 18. Many of the anecdotes in this book were familiar to me, probably ingrained from visiting many Lincoln sites and reading other books. The text is written in dialect. As a former history major I was bothered by several things. I am probably looking at this book with too much of a modern viewpoint. This book doesn't contain any sources. Major The pictures are the most enjoyable part of this book about Lincoln and why I'm giving this book two stars instead of one. My favorite picture came on page 18. Many of the anecdotes in this book were familiar to me, probably ingrained from visiting many Lincoln sites and reading other books. The text is written in dialect. As a former history major I was bothered by several things. I am probably looking at this book with too much of a modern viewpoint. This book doesn't contain any sources. Major people in Lincoln's life receive no name at all, such as his stepmother and three of his four boys. The book also dodges any mention of death other than the death of his mother. That's a tricky feat given Lincoln. There's nothing in this book about his sister's death or the two of his own sons that died during Lincoln's life. The only boy who is named is the one who outlived him - Tad. Of Lincoln's assassination, there was also nothing.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    When I was banished to the library in Kindergarten because I already knew how to read, this was the book that started it all...my strange obsession with Abe Lincoln. This book had just come in. The PTA mom was putting the stickers and cover protector on it when I spotted it. I thought it would be so neat to be the first one to read a book, this book. Now as an adult this could be a contributing factor to my love of biographies and memoirs.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura5

    I could see how kids of the day would love the stories of Lincoln's pranks and "country ways" even after he became a man of the city. And the illustrations (color and B&W) would have engaged many children. However this book felt like larger than life folklore (almost tall tale like) trying to masquerade as biography. Also the book felt didactic in its portrayal of Lincoln protecting a "peaceful Indian" and feeling slavery was cruel. And I feel that it conveys a message (from the day) at those I could see how kids of the day would love the stories of Lincoln's pranks and "country ways" even after he became a man of the city. And the illustrations (color and B&W) would have engaged many children. However this book felt like larger than life folklore (almost tall tale like) trying to masquerade as biography. Also the book felt didactic in its portrayal of Lincoln protecting a "peaceful Indian" and feeling slavery was cruel. And I feel that it conveys a message (from the day) at those points that people of color are "less than" - needing a big white savior, and the illustration of "Negroes" thanking Lincoln bothers me with its strange look of overly happy people in blackface.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    1940 Caldecott Medal Winner Black and white illustrations alternate with color ones--I read for a children's lit class that this was often the case before color illustrations became less expensive to print. It looks like the drawings were done in pencil and color pencil. Pretty realistic depictions, although the black people look mostly the same and have goofy "blackface" faces--not exactly flattering. Abraham Lincoln grows up, beats up some pirates, studies law, and ultimately becomes president i 1940 Caldecott Medal Winner Black and white illustrations alternate with color ones--I read for a children's lit class that this was often the case before color illustrations became less expensive to print. It looks like the drawings were done in pencil and color pencil. Pretty realistic depictions, although the black people look mostly the same and have goofy "blackface" faces--not exactly flattering. Abraham Lincoln grows up, beats up some pirates, studies law, and ultimately becomes president in this wonderful book. I don't know much about Lincoln, so I can't comment on the historical accuracy--I couldn't help but wonder whether it was true that he actually never hunted any animals. I mean, come on... pioneers? I'd be surprised if that were true. It also used dated words like "Negro" to describe black people, but through Lincoln's actions it did depict them favorably, so I thought that kind of made up for the datedness in that area. Lincoln was against the cruelties of the slave trade. The illustrations of black people were pretty bad, though, as mentioned above. The Indian War was also dubiously justified: "...an Indian chief, Black Hawk, had come back to Illinois with his warriors. His tribe had sold the land to the 'paleface,' but Black Hawk said: 'Man-ee-do, the great spirit, gave us the land, it couldn't be sold.' 'Sold is sold,' said the people of Illinois, and went to war to chase the Indians out." Ouch. Maybe that's not overtly justifying it, but it doesn't pay much attention to the fact that the U. S. usually tricked the natives into signing over their land. To Lincoln's credit, though, he did defend an Indian against his own troops (depicted in the book). Other than the race issues, I really enjoyed this book. Lincoln was probably one of the best presidents we've ever had. He was an honest person with a big heart, but he also knew great sadness. This is an amazing story and it makes me want to read more in-depth about Lincoln. Not sure if kids would put up with the length of this book, but who knows?

  7. 4 out of 5

    Friend of Pixie (F.O.P.)

    As the summary says, "America was at a crossroads in 1939 as they debated whether to join the Allies in their battle against Hitler's relentless march across Europe. As European immigrants the d'Aulaires felt keenly the importance of standing against injustice, and saw in Lincoln the archetypal American hero as he stood against the injustice of slavery." While this book is dated and has a tendency to glorify Lincoln as a hero and a savior, we still enjoyed it. I guess I think that despite his de As the summary says, "America was at a crossroads in 1939 as they debated whether to join the Allies in their battle against Hitler's relentless march across Europe. As European immigrants the d'Aulaires felt keenly the importance of standing against injustice, and saw in Lincoln the archetypal American hero as he stood against the injustice of slavery." While this book is dated and has a tendency to glorify Lincoln as a hero and a savior, we still enjoyed it. I guess I think that despite his depression and his faults, Lincoln was an amazing and rare person--one of few politicians who can stand up to mythologizing. I love the D'Aulaires and they don't disappoint. Beautiful illustrations, lively text, and a way with mythology. What's funny is that after I read it to 6-year-old Logan, he asked if Lincoln was a real person and when I said yes, I could see he was a little disappointed. He's always so suspicious that he might be "learning" something and he views non-fiction as a pernicious purveyor of boring facts. His favorite part was when young Lincoln, already quite tall, picked up a smaller kid and walked him along the ceiling to put footprints up there as a joke on his mother. I liked the fact that the story stops right after the end of the civil war. Probably the kid readers of 1939 already knew about the assassination, but Logan doesn't and I was relieved not to have to explain it just yet.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Esther Barajikian

    "Abraham Lincoln" is an award-winning (Caldecott Metal) biography picture book intended for primary and intermediate readers. It tells the life story of this important American hero from his birth in the wilderness in Kentucky through the reunion of the states following the civil war. The book does not cover the tragic end of his life, which in my opinion is great. The book presents Lincoln as a compassionate and at times, fun-loving leader who faithfully served this country through some of it m "Abraham Lincoln" is an award-winning (Caldecott Metal) biography picture book intended for primary and intermediate readers. It tells the life story of this important American hero from his birth in the wilderness in Kentucky through the reunion of the states following the civil war. The book does not cover the tragic end of his life, which in my opinion is great. The book presents Lincoln as a compassionate and at times, fun-loving leader who faithfully served this country through some of it most difficult days. To end the book with his senseless death would undoubtedly leave its young readers with a needless amount of sadness. I gave this book a 3-star rating for its effective telling of an important story and its child-friendly style. The authors, Ingri and Edgar Patin d'Aulaire were able to strike a great balance between historical fact, interesting story line, and moments of humor to convey a message of hope and honor. The illustrations in this book are varied and beautifully done. Some pages contain simple pencil etchings mingled with the text, while other illustrations are full-page drawings in bright colors that allow the reader to enter the world of this great American hero.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tricia Douglas

    This book was chosen for our first month of Caldecott winning books. I have several books by this author/illustrator team but had not read this one before. The historical information was simple and basic for young children. They added several "tall tales" about Lincoln that I hadn't heard before. The illustrations are beautiful. Back in 1939 when this was published the d'Aulaire's used their Norwegian art style with the Old World process of stone lithography. Using color back then was a long, di This book was chosen for our first month of Caldecott winning books. I have several books by this author/illustrator team but had not read this one before. The historical information was simple and basic for young children. They added several "tall tales" about Lincoln that I hadn't heard before. The illustrations are beautiful. Back in 1939 when this was published the d'Aulaire's used their Norwegian art style with the Old World process of stone lithography. Using color back then was a long, difficult process. It wasn't until 1957 that all of the original pictures were redrawn and put on acetate film. I have always loved their pictures and now appreciate this beauty of their artistic talent with the story of Lincoln. Yes, there are stereotypes in this book, where if it was written today the story might be rewritten a little differently. But the Caldecott award would still stand as having this book one of the most distinguished picture books for children.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Cindi

    I read this Caldecott winner with my kids. We all felt like we learned something and enjoyed the pictures as well. I was struck by the fact that as Lincoln and Douglas argued their points, Douglas said he thought the states should each make their own mind up about slavery and Abe Lincoln argued that "a house divided against itself cannot stand." I think he was right on and that idea can be applied to the marriage = one man and one woman idea. I believe it does lie within the interests of the fed I read this Caldecott winner with my kids. We all felt like we learned something and enjoyed the pictures as well. I was struck by the fact that as Lincoln and Douglas argued their points, Douglas said he thought the states should each make their own mind up about slavery and Abe Lincoln argued that "a house divided against itself cannot stand." I think he was right on and that idea can be applied to the marriage = one man and one woman idea. I believe it does lie within the interests of the federal government to take a (righteous) stand in that decision rather than leaving it to the states. Too bad there isn't a candidate that is willing to take that one on! We stopped when the Gettysburg Address was mentioned and read the actual address. We didn't comment on it too much, but it was a nice pause in the story to read Lincoln's great words!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Joan Innes

    A great book, a really interesting and easy read while still being very informative. This book focuses a lot on the youth and formative adult years of Lincoln, although it tells his whole life's story. The colored pencil illustrations add much to the story with country and city scenes and a tall lanky figure and surrounding friends and family throughout. This story gives further insight into the good character attributes of Lincoln. It also tells of difficulties encountered in his personal life A great book, a really interesting and easy read while still being very informative. This book focuses a lot on the youth and formative adult years of Lincoln, although it tells his whole life's story. The colored pencil illustrations add much to the story with country and city scenes and a tall lanky figure and surrounding friends and family throughout. This story gives further insight into the good character attributes of Lincoln. It also tells of difficulties encountered in his personal life and his career path. Like a good storyteller's tale there are many colorful scenes in this book. From reading this, one sees the trail of escapades, encounters, decisions and situations and people that formed Abraham into the upstanding person that he was.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alessandra

    A historically inaccurate, condescending, faux-folk history that talks down to children and pretties up Abraham Lincoln's life. What is it about the 1930s that encouraged people to create fake histories? Colonial Williamsburg dates to the 1930s, as does the whole centennial-of-the-origin-of-baseball myth of Abner Doubleday (which would have surprised Jane Austen, who wrote of it in England in the 1790s). I don't even want to get into European fake folksy history of the 1930s. So fine, here's a myt A historically inaccurate, condescending, faux-folk history that talks down to children and pretties up Abraham Lincoln's life. What is it about the 1930s that encouraged people to create fake histories? Colonial Williamsburg dates to the 1930s, as does the whole centennial-of-the-origin-of-baseball myth of Abner Doubleday (which would have surprised Jane Austen, who wrote of it in England in the 1790s). I don't even want to get into European fake folksy history of the 1930s. So fine, here's a mythic fake history of Abraham Lincoln as if he were Paul Bunyan or something. I got more information about Lincoln from visiting his tomb. At least it mentioned his sons' deaths.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    This book is on the long side, but still short for a history, so it ends up being a larger-than-life tale about the over-sized man, president and pillar in the American story and mythology. The illustrations that get the full space of the over-sized pages to spread out have a two-dimensional and folk Americana feel. It is surprising that the book ends without a mention of his assassination. 2.4 stars (not much for a Caldecott medalist, but 1940 was a very lean year in my opinion).

  14. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    This is the 1940 Caldecott winner we were going to wait to read this until after we read Mei Li the 1938 winner but my 5-year-old found it in the library bag and was so excited to read the book about the baby who grew up. One thing that I'm finding interesting about these early winners is how long they are. They are not meant to be read in a 5 minute sitting like so many of our children's books are today.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Patsy

    This is one of the earliest winners of the Caldecott Medal. The stories it tells are memorable, and -- though I haven't researched them -- feel accurate to the character of Abraham Lincoln. My 38 year old son saw it sitting on the table, and said, "Oh, I remember reading that book." See? Memorable.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cathy Outten

    In reading Caldecott books, this is the first year (1940) that I have been really impressed with the illustrations, as well as the stories. This book beat out Madeline (an honor book in 1940), and I can see where that happened. This book is much more text heavy, which fits with earlier winners of the medal.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    This was my first Lincoln biography. This story was in a "children's best" book that I was given as a gift so long ago that I can't remember when. It was one of the few books I owned. I loved the pictures and loved ol' Abe. It won the Caldecott Medal in 1940 beating out Madeleine.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dianna

    This biography written in 1939 is quite charming although a bit dated and probably idealized. The pictures are wonderful—even my four-year-old agrees—and certainly deserving of the Caldecott medal they earned.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Colin Jones

    Good book!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Karen L.

    My kids loved this book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    Caldecott Medal Winner, 1940 I have always loved the d'Aulaire's books. I'm pretty sure this isn't actually the best biography of Lincoln out there, but I do so enjoy their illustrations.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    This was a favorite of mine when I was a little kid. Good memories! One of the first books that sparked my interest in history.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lea

    Good biography for elementary.

  24. 5 out of 5

    S'Rizzle

    Solid book for my kids to read and understand some of the background of Lincoln's life.

  25. 5 out of 5

    David

    Nice version of Lincoln's life. Great pictures. Interesting what they included and what they left out. It does not talk about his death.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer (JenIsNotaBookSnob)

    I enjoyed the first portion of this book, but, later on in the book there are a few discrepancies with other historical accounts. Recently, I finished reading Russell Freeman's Lincoln: A Photobiography which I enjoyed a lot better. This is a very wordy book despite it's picture book appearance. Freeman's book isn't really that much longer but has a much more complete view of Lincoln and avoids most of the unverified anecdotes present in this book. This is really too long for a picture book. If I enjoyed the first portion of this book, but, later on in the book there are a few discrepancies with other historical accounts. Recently, I finished reading Russell Freeman's Lincoln: A Photobiography which I enjoyed a lot better. This is a very wordy book despite it's picture book appearance. Freeman's book isn't really that much longer but has a much more complete view of Lincoln and avoids most of the unverified anecdotes present in this book. This is really too long for a picture book. If you are looking for a picture book biography, itty bitty bios and couple other similar series are a better choice. I recommend this for people reading the Caldecott winners. Other than that, there are better resources.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Marissa Sansone

    Title: Abraham Lincoln Author: Ingri and Edgar d'Aulaire Illustrator: Genre: K-2 Biography Theme(s): Abraham Lincoln, American History, President Opening line/sentence: Deep in the wilderness down in Kentucky there stood a cabin built of hewn logs. Brief Book Summary: This book chronicles the life of our 16th president of the United States of America. It follows Abe throughout his life with text and pictures. Professional Recommendation/Review #1: Library Journal Review Irene Smith There is nothing tenta Title: Abraham Lincoln Author: Ingri and Edgar d'Aulaire Illustrator: Genre: K-2 Biography Theme(s): Abraham Lincoln, American History, President Opening line/sentence: Deep in the wilderness down in Kentucky there stood a cabin built of hewn logs. Brief Book Summary: This book chronicles the life of our 16th president of the United States of America. It follows Abe throughout his life with text and pictures. Professional Recommendation/Review #1: Library Journal Review Irene Smith There is nothing tentative about one's response to this book. It is love at first sight. [. . . ] apart from every other consideration, the book has a thrilling quality. As for children's appreciation, we believe that they too will be stirred by the sincerity of these pictures and text, each telling with noble simplicity and inevitable pathos the story of Abraham Lincoln. Yet his story has natural humor and action. The author/artists have been successful in finding incidents that will appeal to children's imagination and satisfy their love of incident. Lincoln's boyhood is portrayed with deep understanding of the life of a gangling boy in a backwoods cabin. He grows taller by the page and his face shows the recognizable features before he is grown. This is no brief picture book, but a balanced story of Lincoln's life, up to the last beautiful page that shows the tired war-president seated in an armchair beside Tad Lincoln. Professional Recommendation/Review #2: PSU Libraries Cyndi Giorgis The d'Aulaires' biography of Abraham Lincoln was the recipient of the third Caldecott Medal and was illustrated with lithographs in five colors on stone. This tedious process required etching the drawings on individual stone slabs that weighed from 50 to 100 pounds. The artistic couple also spent a year researching and writing, resulting in a lengthy text that details the sixteenth president's life, from boyhood to the conclusion of the Civil War. A facsimile reproduction of the biography, made by digital imaging, was reissued in 2008 during the bicentennial of Lincoln's birth. A publisher's note recounts the d'Aulaires' creative process as well as the rationale for retaining the original illustrations. Response to Two Professional Reviews: Both of these reviews talk about the wonderful artwork throughout the book. The first review seems to be a little more positive. I like how it mentioned that with each page Abe’s face begins to shows the recognizable features. This review really commends not only the artwork, but the story as well. Evaluation of Literary Elements: The pictures in this book are very well done. Abe’s characterization throughout the book develops. He seems lifelike and relatable. The story opens with Abe as a child, which helps children relate to him as they are reading. Consideration of Instructional Application: I would use this book when in a second grade classroom if the focus was on a specific president. Also, I would use it when introducing my students to biographies. One lesson idea I could do with my students would be for them to interview someone close to them, and write a short biography on them. This could help the kids understand what goes into writing a biography. They could get practice with pieces of writing that are not narrative or fiction.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cheri

    1940 Caldecott Award Winner. I love this story and the illustrations. A very detailed account of Abe Lincoln's life.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ricardo Bizarro

    Ricardo Bizarro Fictionalized Biography Ingri & Edgar, Parin d’Aulaire. New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc. 1957. Print Pages not numbered Summary: This book starts out like a Christian Christmas story. The setting begins in the Kentucky countryside where Abraham Lincoln first sees the world on a Sunday morning. It goes through his life in a fictional way stating his likes and dislikes. He takes a big interest in learning and pursuing an education. But because his family keeps mov Ricardo Bizarro Fictionalized Biography Ingri & Edgar, Parin d’Aulaire. New York: Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group, Inc. 1957. Print Pages not numbered Summary: This book starts out like a Christian Christmas story. The setting begins in the Kentucky countryside where Abraham Lincoln first sees the world on a Sunday morning. It goes through his life in a fictional way stating his likes and dislikes. He takes a big interest in learning and pursuing an education. But because his family keeps moving farther into the countryside (“the time you see your neighbors chimney smoke is time to move”) his father says, it is difficult for Abe to keep going to school. But Abe doesn’t lose his interest. At the age of twenty-one he moves away and becomes a lawyer. He marries and goes into politics. Eventually, just as his wife had suspected he becomes the president of the United States. His presidency goes through the Civil War and frees slaves with the Emancipation Proclamation and becomes famous with his Gettysburg Address. Theme: Abraham was an honest all American hero that played a huge part in U.S. history. Analysis: Characterization: He is portrayed by the authors as a young boy from the boonies that strives to learn and make something of himself. With his actions that he does in the book it really makes him seem like a tenderhearted man. He refuses to kill animals because he loves them so much, he once charged a lady too much when he was a store clerk, and he walked miles to give her back her money. He once got in debt and instead of taking off, he stayed around and paid his debts. And of course, as we all know he wanted to free the slaves and re-unite the country. Historical Reference: To teach little children about his part in history it makes reference to his political campaign, Civil War, The Gettysburg address, and the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation. All these events really make Abe seem like an honest, down to earth, all American hero. Tone: The tone of this book does not sound opinionated at all. It is almost as if it is Abe himself writing this book. It sounds very direct and true. Making his honest persona seem like there is nothing but good about him.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Diana Gonzalez

    2. BRIEF REVIEW Non-fiction book for children, biography, won Caldecott award in 1940. Although, the book was very interesting and it had a happy ending, it was not the ending I expected. Since the book is a biography, I expected it to cover the main characters’ full life from birth to death. But my expectations were cut short since the book failed to cover Abraham Lincoln's assassination. Perhaps the author didn't think it would be appropriate to cover Lincoln's assassination to avoid upsetting 2. BRIEF REVIEW Non-fiction book for children, biography, won Caldecott award in 1940. Although, the book was very interesting and it had a happy ending, it was not the ending I expected. Since the book is a biography, I expected it to cover the main characters’ full life from birth to death. But my expectations were cut short since the book failed to cover Abraham Lincoln's assassination. Perhaps the author didn't think it would be appropriate to cover Lincoln's assassination to avoid upsetting the young readers. 3. CONTENT AREAS This book would be ideal for a history class. Students can learn about the thirteenth President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. Students will also learn about important historical events such as the civil war. After reading the book I would have students write about the qualities of a good president and why this qualities are important. This could also be an excellent book choice to show students that with hard work and dedication, their dreams can come true. 4. COMPREHENSION QUESTIONS a) Where was Abraham Lincoln born? –In a cabin situated in the wilderness in the state of Kentucky. b) Describe Abe? –Physically, he was tall and thin. He was passionate about learning, He was studious and enjoyed reading. He was hard-working, kind, caring, brave, strong, honest, humble, and had a good sense of humor. c) Describe the Northerners and Southerners conflicting views on slavery, what was Abraham’s Lincoln’s opinion on this matter? –the Northerners believed it was wrong to have slaves and that they should be set free, while the Southerners claimed that slaves should remained slaves. d) Which flag was used to represent the Northern states and which flag did the Southern states use during the Civil War? –The North used the Star-Spangled Banner and the South used the Confederate Flag. 5. WONDERS I wonder… a) Most biographies cover the time period of a person’s birth through their death, I wonder why the author of this book chose not to talk about Abraham’s Lincoln’s death/assassination? b) Why did Abraham Lincoln wear a stovepipe hat if he was already very tall? c) How old was Sally, Lincoln’s sister when she got married?

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