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There's No Place Like Home

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In a climate-ravaged future, it’s not easy to grow up. One girl is trying her best in a story about global catastrophe and personal chaos, by the New York Times bestselling author of California. Thirteen-year-old Vic is of the Youngest Generation, fixed in prepubescence after a catastrophic environmental degradation. She’s also her father’s favorite student. But when he tak In a climate-ravaged future, it’s not easy to grow up. One girl is trying her best in a story about global catastrophe and personal chaos, by the New York Times bestselling author of California. Thirteen-year-old Vic is of the Youngest Generation, fixed in prepubescence after a catastrophic environmental degradation. She’s also her father’s favorite student. But when he takes his own life, the perennially ingenuous Vic wants to understand why. As she sets out on her quest, Vic begins to learn that family isn’t something you’re born with—it’s something you build. Edan Lepucki’s There’s No Place Like Home is part of Warmer, a collection of seven visions of a conceivable tomorrow by today’s most thought-provoking authors. Alarming, inventive, intimate, and frightening, each story can be read, or listened to, in a single breathtaking sitting.


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In a climate-ravaged future, it’s not easy to grow up. One girl is trying her best in a story about global catastrophe and personal chaos, by the New York Times bestselling author of California. Thirteen-year-old Vic is of the Youngest Generation, fixed in prepubescence after a catastrophic environmental degradation. She’s also her father’s favorite student. But when he tak In a climate-ravaged future, it’s not easy to grow up. One girl is trying her best in a story about global catastrophe and personal chaos, by the New York Times bestselling author of California. Thirteen-year-old Vic is of the Youngest Generation, fixed in prepubescence after a catastrophic environmental degradation. She’s also her father’s favorite student. But when he takes his own life, the perennially ingenuous Vic wants to understand why. As she sets out on her quest, Vic begins to learn that family isn’t something you’re born with—it’s something you build. Edan Lepucki’s There’s No Place Like Home is part of Warmer, a collection of seven visions of a conceivable tomorrow by today’s most thought-provoking authors. Alarming, inventive, intimate, and frightening, each story can be read, or listened to, in a single breathtaking sitting.

30 review for There's No Place Like Home

  1. 4 out of 5

    Juli

    Vic is 13 years old. In a world ravaged by increased temperatures, her generation will never really grow up. Girls her age, in the extreme heat and stress of everyday life, no longer go through puberty. Lots of people are moving north, abandoning places further south to the baking heat. When her father commits suicide, Vic wants to understand why he took his life, why he let her mother work so hard and why he made some of the choices he made. She discovers that truth isn't simple. There's No Pla Vic is 13 years old. In a world ravaged by increased temperatures, her generation will never really grow up. Girls her age, in the extreme heat and stress of everyday life, no longer go through puberty. Lots of people are moving north, abandoning places further south to the baking heat. When her father commits suicide, Vic wants to understand why he took his life, why he let her mother work so hard and why he made some of the choices he made. She discovers that truth isn't simple. There's No Place Like Home is the 4th story in the Warmer Collection from Amazon/Audible Originals. Each story presents a picture of a world ravaged by global warming. This story is very dark and Vic learns a rough lesson. Not only does she have to contend with a messed up life in a ravaged, hot, horrible world, but she faces betrayal from unexpected directions as well. The future is pretty much hopeless. This entire collection so far has been weird and not all that enjoyable. I didn't really like this story all that much either. Very bleak. Not all that believable. And horrible characters. I felt Vic was horribly betrayed by both her parents...by everyone around her....and by life itself. The story itself is strange, rambling and uncomfortable. Not all stories are for every reader....and this collection so far seems to not really be my cup of tea. I've been listening to the audio versions of these stories. Each one is about an hour long. There's No Place Like Home is narrated by Lauren Ezzo. She does a great job narrating. She reads at an even pace and has a nice voice. I have partial hearing loss, but was easily able to understand the entire story. I'm going to listen to the entire collection, but so far I'm just not feelin' it. For me, these stories have been strange and disappointing. Moving on to the 5th story -- Falls the Shadow. Maybe I will like the next one better.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    My goodness....this is an eerie story - mysterious - depressing - devastating - worrisome - but very impressive writing.... We are introduced to Vic - 13 years old. It was especially interesting to ‘get’ how a young girl feels and thinks when her world around her is volatile. The tone of Edna’s story is personal ... Vic is dealing with the ‘loss’ of her daddy... while awakening to the haunting ‘reality’ about climate changes we all face. Vic is trying to figure things out about her father & mothe My goodness....this is an eerie story - mysterious - depressing - devastating - worrisome - but very impressive writing.... We are introduced to Vic - 13 years old. It was especially interesting to ‘get’ how a young girl feels and thinks when her world around her is volatile. The tone of Edna’s story is personal ... Vic is dealing with the ‘loss’ of her daddy... while awakening to the haunting ‘reality’ about climate changes we all face. Vic is trying to figure things out about her father & mother... the way young people do when - perhaps - they are just waking up to their childhood limited perception of their parents. Vic’s daddy, Lawrence: “He could teach me about irregular verbs and world wars and science and climate change, but he could never once talk about what might be wrong with me and my body. He could never tell me what he was feeling. He was the one whose job hardly brought in money while mom worked her ass off to keep the lights on. He ate three eggs while she and I shared one”. Reading this story - I couldn’t help but stop and think about the recent California fires. The devastating horror that happened in Paradise, Ca. I can remember years ago Global warning and climate changes sounded frightening yet not directly- physically discomforting. Edan Lepucki’s short story points to the reality that the time has arrived - we ‘are’ beginning to ‘feel’ the discomforts of global warming. It’s not a just a distant fear of loss any longer. This short story - $1.99 or Kindle Unlimited on Amazon as an ebook or Audiobook...is one of 7 short stories- a collection as part of ‘The Warmer’ series... all themes are about climate changes. The other six authors who have contributed a story in this collection are: Lauren Groff, Jess Walter, Jesse Kellerman, Skip Horack, Sonya Larson, and Jane Smiley. Personally - I’d buy the entire collection - $1.99 each or $13.93 for the complete series if I knew the profits went to an environmental defense fund to fight global warming. I just don’t know what the status is about the profits of these books... - But I like the purpose behind them. Edan Lepucki is a terrific storyteller. I love her two novels, “California”, and “Woman No. 17”. This short story is exquisitely written, original, and unsentimental.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Misty

    This brilliant “short” reinforces all that science tells us is in our future as a result of climate change and human consumption. The tragically, innately beautiful main character, Vic, acknowledges her fate as a perpetual teenager, locked in a body that will never fully develop as her mind outraces her physical being. She is a youngster forced to mature beyond her years as she faces a cruel, barren world where the wealthy eat regularly and can afford the most precious commodity—clean water. She This brilliant “short” reinforces all that science tells us is in our future as a result of climate change and human consumption. The tragically, innately beautiful main character, Vic, acknowledges her fate as a perpetual teenager, locked in a body that will never fully develop as her mind outraces her physical being. She is a youngster forced to mature beyond her years as she faces a cruel, barren world where the wealthy eat regularly and can afford the most precious commodity—clean water. She dispassionately relates her lot in life without asking for reader sympathy, though this author brilliantly manages to elicit just that. Vic throughout professes her love for her academic father, clearly a man self-absorbed to the point of abuse, and she seeks only to somehow find a justification for his untimely death. Though he has throughout Vic’s life been a well-spring of shared knowledge, he has additionally been the primary reason for their poverty, a fact not necessarily lost on this introspective teen. Her search for the ultimate truth, one that would bring others to their knees, again provides insight into her depth of character—life is what it is and nothing she can do will ever change that. Perhaps the most emotional aspect of this read was that Vic acknowledges that she will not see adulthood, nor will any of those born into her generation, yet she faces that mortality with a pragmatic eye that will leave the reader longing to show her a kinder, gentler existence. From a mother quite obviously doing the best she can to survive and provide, to a “boss” that shows Vic an aspect of humanity that appears to be lacking in this new world, the characters elicit visceral responses that are both profoundly sobering and deeply disturbing. Don’t go into this looking for a plot that is particularly engaging. Instead, look at this as a dire warning that couldn’t be more timely.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne Beers

    Emotional A little dark but ripe with human emotion is how I see this story. It portrays a rather dire look at our planet in the future.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rogerio Cazelato

    Some dystopian meets family drama In a world devastated by climate change, with parts of it disappearing from the map, a girl struggles to overcome the loss of her dad while learning that family priorities are not as black and white stuff. There’s more to it than meets the eye and fills the stomach b

  6. 4 out of 5

    Salem Genseke

    Satisfying I felt like I was there, sharing in their misery. With every horrible thing going on, all the usual problems of family persist. Getting to know your father is easier when he's dead.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Haggerty

    Sorrow Struggle in the changes and yet still trapped by old social imperatives. Heat, hard work and failing environment humanity died quietly singing the old songs. Truth or fiction?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Livesay

    The best of series so far This was story 3 for me and the best thus far. Relatable conditions further in the future. I recommend it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cori

    Home is hot A glimpse of the hot and smokey California future (which we’re actually experiencing now) where self driving cars are the norm and Peter Pan syndrome is real.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    A coming of age story about a girl who will never grow up in the new world of LA

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alysha DeShaé

    I expected these to be more about the changes to the planet, but they're more about how humans are. To some extent, how we remain the same.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anne M. McElvain

    Vivid and Engrossing This story stands out with a clear, vivid picture of the post warming crisis life in LA. I could have read an entire novel about this, and I want to see the movie, the prequels and the sequels. Brava!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Pamela Scott

    https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... At last, a story in the Warmer series where climate change is actually an important part of the tale. I was starting to think I’d blinked and missed it. This is the best story in the series so far because it does what it says on the tin. Hurrah! I loved the story from start to finish. The world building is spot on for such a short piece. I got a real sense of the possible future inhabited by Vic and the adults in her life. Vic and others her age are unable https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... At last, a story in the Warmer series where climate change is actually an important part of the tale. I was starting to think I’d blinked and missed it. This is the best story in the series so far because it does what it says on the tin. Hurrah! I loved the story from start to finish. The world building is spot on for such a short piece. I got a real sense of the possible future inhabited by Vic and the adults in her life. Vic and others her age are unable to grow up, stuck in puberty because of an environmental mess. This really upset me for some reason. I liked the way the author still had the messed up environment of Vic’s world central to the story while focusing on smaller details such as the death of Vic’s father and her mother confronting an open family secret.

  14. 5 out of 5

    sharon in Hercules

    Women in a strange land This story will make you happy for a home at all. Women overcome the challenges after the father's suicide. The devastation due to global warming. A life of difficulty and being always uncomfortable.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christa

    My favorite in the Warmer Collection

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathie

    A climate change novella published and distribute gratis by Amazon. A quick read of a dystopian, realistic near future. Good pace. Surprisingly well done.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Allyson

    This was a gripping story that showed one of the worst, but possible, outcomes of disastrous climate change. Entire generations growing up knowing they will be the last is a heartbreaking, but realistic future if we continue the way we are.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cyndy

    Part of the Warmer collection from Amazon Prime. LA has been essentially abandoned because of the heat. People have moved north, if they can afford. What happens to a man, his wife, and their daughter that must stay. Who becomes the breadwinner and why? Why can't the parents talk to the daughter that will not be affected by puberty. Written from the daughter's perspective.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lacy

    I liked this story but wish there had been more detail about "kids" or future generation and what the mystery condition was that ailed them. It felt very unresolved, where other issues were resolved, at least for this girl's story.

  20. 4 out of 5

    saradevil

    You have to put real effort into making stories about the end of the world that are this bad.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Carla

    Another in the Warmer series of post-climate-apocalyptic stories from Amazon, this one a family drama.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    Like Mad Max I wasn’t a big fan of this story but it did remind me of the Mad Max movies. If you are into that type of story then it might be for you.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

  24. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  25. 4 out of 5

    Steve Nelson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Steve Walker

  27. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Brown

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rhonda

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jim

  30. 5 out of 5

    Megan Tafavoti

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