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Imaginary Men

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This charming novel about a Bengali-American matchmaker in San Francisco who creates an imaginary fiancé in order to satisfy her marriage-minded traditional parents offers a fresh variation on the timeless theme of a young woman's quest for true love. It seemed like a good idea at the time. Lina Ray has a knack for pairing up perfect couples as a professional matchmaker in This charming novel about a Bengali-American matchmaker in San Francisco who creates an imaginary fiancé in order to satisfy her marriage-minded traditional parents offers a fresh variation on the timeless theme of a young woman's quest for true love. It seemed like a good idea at the time. Lina Ray has a knack for pairing up perfect couples as a professional matchmaker in San Francisco, but her well-meaning, highly traditional Indian family wants her to get married. When her Auntie Kiki introduces Lina to the bachelor from hell at her sister's wedding in India, Lina panics and blurts out, "I'm engaged!" Because what's the harm in a little lie? Who's sari now? Lina scrambles to find a real fiancé because Auntie Kiki will be coming to America soon to approve the match. But date after disastrous date gets her no closer to her prince -- until an actual prince arrives on her doorstep. Lina hasn't been able to stop fantasizing about traditional but dashing Raja Prasad since she met him in India. In fact, her imaginary fiancé has begun to resemble him! Now Raja is in San Francisco and wants Lina to find a suitable bride for his brother. Though they live oceans apart, Lina longs to bridge the gap. But when her fantastic fib catches up with her, life is suddenly like a Bollywood flick gone horribly wrong. Lina may have an over-developed fantasy life, but she certainly never imagined things would turn out like this!


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This charming novel about a Bengali-American matchmaker in San Francisco who creates an imaginary fiancé in order to satisfy her marriage-minded traditional parents offers a fresh variation on the timeless theme of a young woman's quest for true love. It seemed like a good idea at the time. Lina Ray has a knack for pairing up perfect couples as a professional matchmaker in This charming novel about a Bengali-American matchmaker in San Francisco who creates an imaginary fiancé in order to satisfy her marriage-minded traditional parents offers a fresh variation on the timeless theme of a young woman's quest for true love. It seemed like a good idea at the time. Lina Ray has a knack for pairing up perfect couples as a professional matchmaker in San Francisco, but her well-meaning, highly traditional Indian family wants her to get married. When her Auntie Kiki introduces Lina to the bachelor from hell at her sister's wedding in India, Lina panics and blurts out, "I'm engaged!" Because what's the harm in a little lie? Who's sari now? Lina scrambles to find a real fiancé because Auntie Kiki will be coming to America soon to approve the match. But date after disastrous date gets her no closer to her prince -- until an actual prince arrives on her doorstep. Lina hasn't been able to stop fantasizing about traditional but dashing Raja Prasad since she met him in India. In fact, her imaginary fiancé has begun to resemble him! Now Raja is in San Francisco and wants Lina to find a suitable bride for his brother. Though they live oceans apart, Lina longs to bridge the gap. But when her fantastic fib catches up with her, life is suddenly like a Bollywood flick gone horribly wrong. Lina may have an over-developed fantasy life, but she certainly never imagined things would turn out like this!

30 review for Imaginary Men

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I learned that I too can write a mediocre chick lit novel because all you need to get one published is: - gutsy, accomplished, strong-minded protagonists and a dimwitted, medieval-minded, antifeminist supporting cast - an obstacle that, even if I keep describing it as impossible, is really not an obstacle just a mere wall 6 inches from the floor that the protagonist is too lazy to step over - a really really really good-looking (and obvious) love interest - to really get my book published, i should I learned that I too can write a mediocre chick lit novel because all you need to get one published is: - gutsy, accomplished, strong-minded protagonists and a dimwitted, medieval-minded, antifeminist supporting cast - an obstacle that, even if I keep describing it as impossible, is really not an obstacle just a mere wall 6 inches from the floor that the protagonist is too lazy to step over - a really really really good-looking (and obvious) love interest - to really get my book published, i should include something "exotic" like Indian culture and describe it as stereotypically as possible with words like "spicy" and "sweat" - accessible language; and by accessible, i mean sixth grade slang and sentence structure

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nisha

    I picked this book up, loving the premise. An American Desi woman who feels pressured to get married after her younger sister gets married (almost) the traditional way. At 29, her extended family try to introduce her to suitable matches - to which American raised Lina was much too independent to handle. So she lies, starting with the creation of a fiance who is absolutely to die for, IF he existed. She even manages to name him 'Raja' after an sexy (but supposedly a traditional Indian) stranger s I picked this book up, loving the premise. An American Desi woman who feels pressured to get married after her younger sister gets married (almost) the traditional way. At 29, her extended family try to introduce her to suitable matches - to which American raised Lina was much too independent to handle. So she lies, starting with the creation of a fiance who is absolutely to die for, IF he existed. She even manages to name him 'Raja' after an sexy (but supposedly a traditional Indian) stranger she meets during the wedding. Now, Lina has to find herself the perfect man to make her lies truth, but on the way, her own past and her values make her question what she really wants. The good things include this light-hearted story (very chick-lit, but why else would I pick it up), comedy, and fun characters. I especially liked the gay friend, Harry Kumar, though I wished he made more of an appearance. Lina's sisters were also nicely described, if not a little flat in development. Raja was also exciting as the sexy stranger who wants to know more about Lina. But, as a Indian woman raised completely in America, I couldn't understand a lot of things about Lina. Ok, I can understand her to an extent. But not as Ms. Banerjee tries to portray her. Lina does not speak her mother-tongue so feels no real connection with India. So when she does go to India, her view is one a tourist, often complaining about the inconveniences or describing the cultural absurdities. This is fine, until I remember that Lina is 30. For a woman of 30, she speaks as if she was an angsty teenager rebelling against the walls of her culture. Which is even a bigger contradiction, since her family isn't orthodox and are open American culture. They don't follow the caste system and don't require her to stay with the family, as unmarried Indian women are expected to do. They don't even mind her finding someone who isn't Bengali. Now, tell me, where is that wall? Clearly, I feel like Ms. Banerjee fails to create an accurate picture of American desi lifestyle. Also, as many Desi chick lits, the romance part falls flat. Raja was created nicely, until he became a cardboard cutout - wasting the potential character development about bridging 2 cultures. Actually, there was no real romance, just a prince who would make Lina's fairy tale ending come true. I can recommend it as one of the better books of the genre, but it is mediocre in delivery.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Book Concierge

    Lina Ray is a professional matchmaker in the San Francisco bay area who has yet to make her own match. When at her sister’s wedding in India, her Aunt Kiki insists on arranging a marriage. To save herself from “the bachelor from hell” she blurts out “I’m engaged!” Before she knows it she has invented a gorgeous, rich man, and now Aunt Kiki is headed to California to check him out and confirm the match. Lina has just two months to meet and get engaged to her dream prince! Okay, this is chick-lit, Lina Ray is a professional matchmaker in the San Francisco bay area who has yet to make her own match. When at her sister’s wedding in India, her Aunt Kiki insists on arranging a marriage. To save herself from “the bachelor from hell” she blurts out “I’m engaged!” Before she knows it she has invented a gorgeous, rich man, and now Aunt Kiki is headed to California to check him out and confirm the match. Lina has just two months to meet and get engaged to her dream prince! Okay, this is chick-lit, with a cultural nuance. The characters are thinly drawn caricatures, and the plot is what you’d expect from the description. It’s a fast, fun read, but there isn’t much substance here. Sometimes a girl just needs a little mind candy; it did satisfy several challenges for me, and it’s one more book off the TBR mountain.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ajoque

    The writing was a bit too elementary for me. And it's not a good book to read after having just finished The Tea Rose. I don't want to give it an unfair review but it was hard to grow attached to any of the characters. The entire time I kept thinking of how detached I felt from the characters and the plot. Even when she tries to be creative with her story telling she still falls short. Jumping from one situation to the next and concluding chapters or paragraphs with no resolutions. I had a feeli The writing was a bit too elementary for me. And it's not a good book to read after having just finished The Tea Rose. I don't want to give it an unfair review but it was hard to grow attached to any of the characters. The entire time I kept thinking of how detached I felt from the characters and the plot. Even when she tries to be creative with her story telling she still falls short. Jumping from one situation to the next and concluding chapters or paragraphs with no resolutions. I had a feeling that something was amiss for the entirety of the novel... Then there were all those Hindi words that were italicized; which I thought was because she'd have a glossary in the back for, but it was just for emphasis and grew tiresome after a while. I will, however, give her credit for her description of places and events in India.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Katjusa

    I bought this because Amazon suggested it as a related book I might enjoy. Over and over, I found myself having to reread passages because my mind had wandered. Superficial characters, predictable plot. It has a few cute moments and good observations but overall "Imaginary Men" comes off as clueless fluff.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rucha

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. There were some things I appreciated about this book, and some things I didn't. Let's start out with the positive-I could relate to the character as a single Desi woman raised in the U.S. who comes from a middle-class, well-to-do family, feeling the pressures of marriage brought on by culture and patriarchy. I also call my parents ma and baba, feel a close connection to India although as an Indian-American at times feel lost and strange in a country I was born in, and love living in my own apart There were some things I appreciated about this book, and some things I didn't. Let's start out with the positive-I could relate to the character as a single Desi woman raised in the U.S. who comes from a middle-class, well-to-do family, feeling the pressures of marriage brought on by culture and patriarchy. I also call my parents ma and baba, feel a close connection to India although as an Indian-American at times feel lost and strange in a country I was born in, and love living in my own apartment with hard wood floors, in a west coast city. I am glad that Banerjee also created a female, Desi character who was open about her sexuality and did not shy away from being explicit about Lina's fantasies and desires, especially when the book got a little saucy when Lina took a shower in Raja's hotel room shower. I also like that the author gave Lina a gay best friend, especially since homosexuality has been a taboo topic to discuss among Indians & Indian-Americans, until recently. Okay, the not so good things- The book isn't written very well, which makes it a quick read. It does have its moments, when the words form vivid sentences that you can easily imagine. Overall though at times when I was reading the book I felt like Banerjee was trying too hard to create analogies or descriptions, it seemed force, and didn't come out organically. Also, the whole imaginary man idea got old. Although I appreciate that the author was trying to establish Lina as unable to get over a fiance who in her mind was still the ideal to which she measured every man against, there were moments in the storyline when the imaginary man could have been left out. The story is a little over-the-top for me. Creating fiances, meeting a prince who pursues and chases, holding the prince on a pedestal, hanging off every word he says, it's all so Disney. There were times when I was irritated that Lina didn't have a spine and went along with whatever Raja said and did. It seemed to be all about him, getting to know him, trying to figure him out, scanning his hotel room for clues into his personality, talking to his mom about his childhood. What about her? What about her past, her childhood? It was too much. I can see this book being turned into a chick flick, easily. Maybe that was what Banerjee was attempting.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Big dumb fun. I read this last night in 3 hours, not sure why I put it on reserve at the library; it must have been in a Jane Austen tribute list or something. It was predictable, but lovable. The main character is a matchmaker in San Franscico, orginally from India. After the wedding of her sister, she dreams up the perfect fiance...a prince, and is mortified when she can't come clean to her family and they expect to meet him. Of course she ends up with a prince, really...but it's not a plot sp Big dumb fun. I read this last night in 3 hours, not sure why I put it on reserve at the library; it must have been in a Jane Austen tribute list or something. It was predictable, but lovable. The main character is a matchmaker in San Franscico, orginally from India. After the wedding of her sister, she dreams up the perfect fiance...a prince, and is mortified when she can't come clean to her family and they expect to meet him. Of course she ends up with a prince, really...but it's not a plot spoiler, because COME ON, you knew she would anywho. I'm not sure why I liked this book as much as I did. But I did. Oh well, at least I wasn't angry staying up late until midnight reading it!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    Lina makes a living by pairing up the perfect couples to be married. After losing her fiance in an accident, Lina prefers to continue being the Matchmaker instead of looking for love again. While in India for her sister's wedding she creates a little "white lie" that she is engaged to avoid marital pressures from her family. Little did she know how the lie could spiral into a big misunderstanding. Along the way, she meets Raja. Could he be the perfect man for Lina? Romantic and funny. A quick re Lina makes a living by pairing up the perfect couples to be married. After losing her fiance in an accident, Lina prefers to continue being the Matchmaker instead of looking for love again. While in India for her sister's wedding she creates a little "white lie" that she is engaged to avoid marital pressures from her family. Little did she know how the lie could spiral into a big misunderstanding. Along the way, she meets Raja. Could he be the perfect man for Lina? Romantic and funny. A quick read to start off the new year!

  9. 5 out of 5

    shruti

    Most people think chick lit is bad writing but this is just badly-written chick lit. Plot points are introduced randomly, characters are never fully fleshed out...I can handle strange chick lit premises but they need to be well-written. I hate to pan someone's writing because I don't know if I could do better, but this was really hard to read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Manisha

    Rubbish, I felt nothing for the main characters and the story is so out dated: if Lina doesn't want to get married then why doesn't she just come out straight with it, she already lives away from her parents, she isn't a virgin and is supposedly an independent woman so why does she need to invent a fiance to please her parents? This is chick lit with no soul what so ever. Avoid.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Anna-Lisa

    This was an awesome tomance novel in Bollywood style! I loved the funny and so realistic characters and the fact that this wasn't a love story with kitsch. It was cute, a fast read and touching. It was a book which made me sigh in the end. :)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dorothy

    An excellent combination of cross cultural travels and comedy. I was touched by the innocent and loving side of the lead. She tries to find Mr Right for herself and for her family while keeping one food in America and one in India.

  13. 4 out of 5

    aarthi

    This book is terrible. Don't waste a moment of your life reading it. I got the idea from others that it would be amusing to see what desi chick lit is, but having dipped a millimeter of my toe into it, I ran away screaming. It's the brown equivalent of shuffling.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Karina

    Cute multi-cultural chick lit that any forward-thinking woman can relate to. It also has a bit of Elizabeth/Darcy flavoring thrown in as well...and real princes :).

  15. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    This book gets 2.5 stars from me because it was a quick and easy read, which we all need sometimes. But really?..... Superficial characters and a predictable plot; the writing was a bit elementary for my taste. Lina is a matchmaker who lives in San Francisco, but who is Indian by birth and whose traditional parents still live in India. Two years ago her fiancé died, and Lina has never gotten over him, and never got back into the dating scene. At Lina’s sister’s wedding, in India, Lina is faced wi This book gets 2.5 stars from me because it was a quick and easy read, which we all need sometimes. But really?..... Superficial characters and a predictable plot; the writing was a bit elementary for my taste. Lina is a matchmaker who lives in San Francisco, but who is Indian by birth and whose traditional parents still live in India. Two years ago her fiancé died, and Lina has never gotten over him, and never got back into the dating scene. At Lina’s sister’s wedding, in India, Lina is faced with matchmaking parents. Foolishly, she makes up a fiancé who doesn’t exist (except as a person she met that evening about whom she is now fantasizing). Her dead fiancé follows her around and talks to her – and she talks back. I really don’t like books where a stumbling protagonist just makes things worse by piling lies upon lies. A simple lie to get her through the evening has her subsequently establishing a whole persona about her fictional fiancé – having a friend send her postcards from around the world, for instance. Don’t they know it will only be worse in the end? I have no patience for this type of story. It isn’t a bad story – it just isn’t memorable. I recommend it for your easy beach reading.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marisa Gonzalez

    A young woman goes to her sister's wedding in India. Feeling pressure from the family to marry she lies by stating that she is engaged to a handsome rich man only to meet a handsome rich man that evening who she is interested in. Her dilemma, finding a rich man to get engaged to before the family discovers her lie and whether or not she should pursue a long distance relationship with the man she met that evening. This book follows a basic formula for chick lit. It was very silly with little conf A young woman goes to her sister's wedding in India. Feeling pressure from the family to marry she lies by stating that she is engaged to a handsome rich man only to meet a handsome rich man that evening who she is interested in. Her dilemma, finding a rich man to get engaged to before the family discovers her lie and whether or not she should pursue a long distance relationship with the man she met that evening. This book follows a basic formula for chick lit. It was very silly with little conflict and barely any plot.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Melody

    This was a cute book. I read it because I wanted something fun and breezy to read, and this was. I do feel the ending was a bit rushed though. As soon as Raja comes into the picture again, that whole part of the book was rushed. I don’t know if the author just wanted to go ahead and wrap it up or what, but might have been nice for a little more to the story. But I won’t complain too much…I wanted a fast read and this one was.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Denise Tarasuk

    Light and fun! Anjali Banerjee let you in with the main character who gets herself into a big mess with an Imaginary Man! As reader I felt like I was part of the family, grasping for air, trying to solve the problem and find Mr. Right. Fun to the very last page. Enjoyment! I could not put Imaginary Men down!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Palmer

    This was a really interesting story. If only it were as simple as being able to see a silver thread connect one heart to another to find true love. That would be something to witness each day. I did like Lina. She was strong, determined, and willing to be true to herself.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hailey

    This book was super cute and a quick read! Finished within 24 hours :)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    The problem with putting books aside to journal later, is that you often forget what you wanted to say about them. I'm at a point in my life, when do to circumstances and responsibilities, I only seem to be able to tolerate light, semi-frivolous reads; ones that entertain and amuse and don't demand much thought or concentration. This book, which was left on a take a book, leave a book shelf that is a BookCrossing zone, seemed like it might fit the bill -- and it did. Having spent time living in The problem with putting books aside to journal later, is that you often forget what you wanted to say about them. I'm at a point in my life, when do to circumstances and responsibilities, I only seem to be able to tolerate light, semi-frivolous reads; ones that entertain and amuse and don't demand much thought or concentration. This book, which was left on a take a book, leave a book shelf that is a BookCrossing zone, seemed like it might fit the bill -- and it did. Having spent time living in India, I could appreciate Indian born, but American raised Lina's reactions to returning to India for the full scale Brahman wedding of her younger sister. And, having once made up an imaginary beau who I told my friends I was out on dates with rather than go to parties I didn't want to, I can understand the impulse that caused Lina to make up a fiance to get her family off her back. Her journey from imaginary men to real relationships was amusing (though once again, I have to ask the age old question: why a gay best friend???) I also appreciated Lina's growing awareness of the two cultures that made up her life; the discovery of beauty where she once only saw a cacophony of colors, smells, opulence and squalor; the recognition that the things she took for granted, such as not water when you turn a faucet are a privilege, not an inalienable right. All in all, it was a good way to escape between the pages of a book. Light entertaining, thought provoking, but not all-consuming.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    This book uses a mish-mash of many stock romance plots, the matchmaker, the faked fiance etc. and blends it with an exotic Indian background which freshens them up nicely. Lena, the female lead, had this "imaginary man" which represents her ideal and which she measures all other men by. That is not a problem in itself just another of those romance cliches I was referring to, however, she actually sees, feels, hears and talks to this imaginary man, not so much a problem in the privacy of her apar This book uses a mish-mash of many stock romance plots, the matchmaker, the faked fiance etc. and blends it with an exotic Indian background which freshens them up nicely. Lena, the female lead, had this "imaginary man" which represents her ideal and which she measures all other men by. That is not a problem in itself just another of those romance cliches I was referring to, however, she actually sees, feels, hears and talks to this imaginary man, not so much a problem in the privacy of her apartment, more than a little crazy when she does it in public and while on dates with other men. But, the end of the book made me smile and sigh so I was willing to forgive that little craziness in the middle.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I liked this book, it was a quick read. I liked Banerjee's writing style and short chapters, made it much easier to breeze through it. The actual story was a little predictable, but it was cute. It told the story of how pretty much every girl is on a life-long search for her prince charming. Despite the predictable-ness, I still found it to be a good story. I would probably recommend it to some of my younger friends rather than say my mother or aunts. I also enjoyed that it brought the two cultu I liked this book, it was a quick read. I liked Banerjee's writing style and short chapters, made it much easier to breeze through it. The actual story was a little predictable, but it was cute. It told the story of how pretty much every girl is on a life-long search for her prince charming. Despite the predictable-ness, I still found it to be a good story. I would probably recommend it to some of my younger friends rather than say my mother or aunts. I also enjoyed that it brought the two cultures together and as a reader I was able to learn more about the Indian culture. I always love learning about new cultures, and I feel as though the author did a good job at not making it over the top for mostly American/western readers.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Payal

    I don't know why but it just didn't capture me like i hoped it would. but i liked that in the end all the characters had closures. but the parts of India, I didn't feel like it was really experienced with living there.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    I should have remembered that I loathe with a passion stories that rely on the "I made up a boyfriend/fiance that my entire family believes in wholeheartedly, how shall I ever confess to them that I lied like a rug about it?" I can never believe in relationships that start with that level of deception, and 55 pages into this one, the "hero" has appeared once for 15 minutes, during which time he told the heroine that he wants a perfect, dutiful wife who will support him, bear his children, and ta I should have remembered that I loathe with a passion stories that rely on the "I made up a boyfriend/fiance that my entire family believes in wholeheartedly, how shall I ever confess to them that I lied like a rug about it?" I can never believe in relationships that start with that level of deception, and 55 pages into this one, the "hero" has appeared once for 15 minutes, during which time he told the heroine that he wants a perfect, dutiful wife who will support him, bear his children, and take care of his aging mother. I know the author is playing with Pride and Prejudice tropes, but I couldn't bear watching a P&P story entangled with a fake-fiance story.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Robbin Melton

    I love Indian fiction and this book is almost perfect! It's fast-paced, sweet, funny and quirky. It's the age-old story about a woman unexpectedly meeting her prince charming. The only flaw in the story, however, is it moved a bit too fast about two-thirds through the book. And, towards the last few chapters, this tale was moving so fast a lot of details got lost and you have to use your imagination. The story does have two cute twists to it, though, and it does make for very entertaining readin I love Indian fiction and this book is almost perfect! It's fast-paced, sweet, funny and quirky. It's the age-old story about a woman unexpectedly meeting her prince charming. The only flaw in the story, however, is it moved a bit too fast about two-thirds through the book. And, towards the last few chapters, this tale was moving so fast a lot of details got lost and you have to use your imagination. The story does have two cute twists to it, though, and it does make for very entertaining reading. I only wish the story was fleshed out more in the last third of the book. I recommend as part of your summer beach reading.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Wendi Lau

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was a perfect Bollywood type story in book form. The main character is strong, smart, independent, and not wanting to get married. She sees silvery threads connecting people meant to be together and those who share a special connection already. Neat! The end is a little boggy because it is not wrapped up tidily. Going toward the end, you are not even sure she'll end up with the guy and happily ever after. I'm still not sure. But up til then, thrilling to find out more and more about the guy This was a perfect Bollywood type story in book form. The main character is strong, smart, independent, and not wanting to get married. She sees silvery threads connecting people meant to be together and those who share a special connection already. Neat! The end is a little boggy because it is not wrapped up tidily. Going toward the end, you are not even sure she'll end up with the guy and happily ever after. I'm still not sure. But up til then, thrilling to find out more and more about the guy of interest. Like the way they are both described.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marla Martenson

    This is the first book from Anjali Banerjee's book that I read. I picked it up at Target a few years ago. It was a sweet story about a matchmaker, Lina Ray,in San Francisco. Her highly traditional Indian family wants her to get married and when her Aunt introduces Lina to a bachelor she has no interest in at her sister's wedding in India, Lina blurts out, "I'm engaged!" She thought hey, what's the harm in a little lie? Well, that opens a can of worms and has Lina scrambling to invent a financé. This is the first book from Anjali Banerjee's book that I read. I picked it up at Target a few years ago. It was a sweet story about a matchmaker, Lina Ray,in San Francisco. Her highly traditional Indian family wants her to get married and when her Aunt introduces Lina to a bachelor she has no interest in at her sister's wedding in India, Lina blurts out, "I'm engaged!" She thought hey, what's the harm in a little lie? Well, that opens a can of worms and has Lina scrambling to invent a financé. I found it to be a fun read and wanting more from Anjali. She is a wonderful writer.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rrshively

    I have to admit to my more sophisticated friends that I really am a sucker for a well-written romantic novel, and this is one. It started out a little slow, but I soon became hooked. I especially enjoyed the overlay of Indian culture to the story. Also, the heroine, Lina, asks herself questions about people, places, and events the way I do. The silver threads and the imaginary man are quite fantastic, but they work for me. Finally, I loved her descriptions of the men in the story. It was amusing I have to admit to my more sophisticated friends that I really am a sucker for a well-written romantic novel, and this is one. It started out a little slow, but I soon became hooked. I especially enjoyed the overlay of Indian culture to the story. Also, the heroine, Lina, asks herself questions about people, places, and events the way I do. The silver threads and the imaginary man are quite fantastic, but they work for me. Finally, I loved her descriptions of the men in the story. It was amusing to have them compared to movie actors from Pee Wee Herman to Johnny Depp.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Phoebe

    Lina's skills as a professional matchmaker in the States seem to do her no good in her personal life. Her fiance has been killed in a car wreck, and she begins to doubt that he was never faithful to her anyway, though she remembers him as the perfect man. Back in India for her sister's wedding, Lina invents an engagement, and a man, to avoid being betrothed to an unappealing guy. And then she bumps into Raja, who just might be the perfect guy. Funny and poignant and most certainly romantic. Raja Lina's skills as a professional matchmaker in the States seem to do her no good in her personal life. Her fiance has been killed in a car wreck, and she begins to doubt that he was never faithful to her anyway, though she remembers him as the perfect man. Back in India for her sister's wedding, Lina invents an engagement, and a man, to avoid being betrothed to an unappealing guy. And then she bumps into Raja, who just might be the perfect guy. Funny and poignant and most certainly romantic. Raja felt a little one-dimensional but this can be overlooked...

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