kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

The League of Frightened Men

Availability: Ready to download

Paul Chapin's college cronies never forgave themselves for the prank that crippled their friend. Yet with Harvard days behind them, they thought they were forgiven -- until a class reunion ends in a fatal fall. This league of frightened men seeks Nero Wolfe's help. But are Wolfe's brilliance and Archie's tenacity enough to outwit a most cunning killer?


Compare
kode adsense disini

Paul Chapin's college cronies never forgave themselves for the prank that crippled their friend. Yet with Harvard days behind them, they thought they were forgiven -- until a class reunion ends in a fatal fall. This league of frightened men seeks Nero Wolfe's help. But are Wolfe's brilliance and Archie's tenacity enough to outwit a most cunning killer?

30 review for The League of Frightened Men

  1. 5 out of 5

    Evgeny

    I am not going to retell the book's blurb as it contains too many spoilers - in my opinion. Nero Wolfe found himself without a job for quite some time - and with his money running out. Pestered by Archie Goodwin who is a man of action and cannot stand the prolonged absence of it, the great New York detective decides to take a case he rejected some time ago, only this time he chooses to involve more people as his clients: a group of people known as The League of Frightened Men thorough the book. I I am not going to retell the book's blurb as it contains too many spoilers - in my opinion. Nero Wolfe found himself without a job for quite some time - and with his money running out. Pestered by Archie Goodwin who is a man of action and cannot stand the prolonged absence of it, the great New York detective decides to take a case he rejected some time ago, only this time he chooses to involve more people as his clients: a group of people known as The League of Frightened Men thorough the book. Initially the mystery part seems to be completely missing as the culprit is known in advance and around 75% of the book it is more about character interactions which are always great in Nero Wolfe's books. I must give a warning however: nothing is as clear and obvious as it seems to be. The real mystery will appear later and only Wolve's genius analytical skills will help solving the case. As the second book of the series it still has some rough edges and the main characters are still not fully established, but the pure fun factor is there and makes this novel worth easy 4 stars. This review is a copy/paste of my BookLikes one: http://gene.booklikes.com/post/889508...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gary Sundell

    4.5 stars. Not quite there yet as Stout is still working on things. Cramer makes his first visit to the brownstone smoking a pipe and calling Archie "sonny". Later when Archie visits Cramer at his office Cramer is finally working a cigar. The more irritating version of Cramer hasn't jelled yet. Lon Cohen at the Gazette hasn't appeared yet. Lily Rowan doesn't show up until book 6. Good solid mystery. I had one element figured out but was off on the rest.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    3.5 stars I read almost every Nero Wolfe book when I was younger and I still enjoy going back and reading them on occasion although they may not have the same attraction that they once did. The Nero Wolfe books were written between 1934 - 1975 and this was the second book in the series. Reading this book was like stepping into a time capsule. Roadsters, pay phones, cigar stores, etc. And the 1930's slang ... "gat", "lob", etc. At first I found this annoying. Even Wolfe had to ask Archie what he m 3.5 stars I read almost every Nero Wolfe book when I was younger and I still enjoy going back and reading them on occasion although they may not have the same attraction that they once did. The Nero Wolfe books were written between 1934 - 1975 and this was the second book in the series. Reading this book was like stepping into a time capsule. Roadsters, pay phones, cigar stores, etc. And the 1930's slang ... "gat", "lob", etc. At first I found this annoying. Even Wolfe had to ask Archie what he meant at one point. However, I soon got over this and enjoyed the story and life at Wolfe's brownstone on West Thirty-Fifth Street in New York. In this story the bank account is getting low and Archie has to goad Wolfe into doing work (which seems to be a common theme in the series). The case Wolfe takes is one that he had previously turned down. Paul Chapin was left handicapped by a college prank. Two of his Harvard classmates have died under mysterious circumstances and the others have received poems that seem to indicate they are all going to be killed ... one at a time. Wolfe agrees to take the job and charges each man a fee based on their net worth / income. Essentially his job is to remove their fear. As mentioned this is the second book in the series and having read most of the others it seems going back to this one that the characters may not be as fully developed as I have come to know them. There are some other discrepancies between this story and later ones. Nothing major that detracts from the story. Of course Wolfe gathers all of the members of the league in his office at the end where he will remove their fear. Recommend to anyone who enjoys classic mystery stories.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Suzy

    I love Nero Wolfe mysteries for so many reasons. The banter between Wolfe and sidekick, feet-on-the-street Archie Goodwin, Wolfe's genius and Goodwin's street smarts, the conjuring of an era (roadsters, sedans, switchboards, 1930's attire, etc.), food, orchids, snappy dialogue and the supporting characters both in the brownstone and outside. In this one Wolfe is becoming desperate for work and takes a job against his better judgment. Fifteen middle-aged men are frightened out of their wits that a I love Nero Wolfe mysteries for so many reasons. The banter between Wolfe and sidekick, feet-on-the-street Archie Goodwin, Wolfe's genius and Goodwin's street smarts, the conjuring of an era (roadsters, sedans, switchboards, 1930's attire, etc.), food, orchids, snappy dialogue and the supporting characters both in the brownstone and outside. In this one Wolfe is becoming desperate for work and takes a job against his better judgment. Fifteen middle-aged men are frightened out of their wits that a former Harvard classmate is out to kill their group one-by-one. The former classmate was crippled in a hazing incident in college and the group of men has been haunted by it every since. Indeed, they call themselves the League of Atonement. Two of their number died in suspicious circumstances and now one has gone missing. They assemble at Wolfe's house to explain their plight and ask Wolfe for his help. Wolfe takes the job, assigning each group member a dollar amount they will pay if he is successful. Success in this case is taking away their fear. While it seems clear that the crippled classmate is the perpetrator, with fifteen people in the group, there is plenty of room for suspicion and there are plenty of red herrings to keep ones interest. Wolfe, notorious for insisting that people come to him, actually leaves his brownstone twice. Once from being kidnapped by the main suspect's wife and once to go out to get a confession from the suspect. Of course we have the assembling of the entire group at the end of the book where Wolfe explains his deductions about the deaths and the missing group member and defends his success in order to be paid. This was a lot of fun!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth (Alaska)

    I've decided I should be reading these in close to publication order. There were a couple of references in The Red Box to earlier cases, one of which I knew was one I'd read. It wasn't exactly a spoiler, but I became leery of what Stout might throw in another. There were references to earlier cases in this one, too, but I laughed (even at myself) for knowing Stout had not yet written about them and was just making up Wolfe's history of genius as he could. This one starts out with no case and Arch I've decided I should be reading these in close to publication order. There were a couple of references in The Red Box to earlier cases, one of which I knew was one I'd read. It wasn't exactly a spoiler, but I became leery of what Stout might throw in another. There were references to earlier cases in this one, too, but I laughed (even at myself) for knowing Stout had not yet written about them and was just making up Wolfe's history of genius as he could. This one starts out with no case and Archie itching for something to do. That he was restless would be an understatement. Even with the below, there is almost nothing to dislike about Archie Goodwin and I can lay my hands quickly on no quote that better epitomizes the relationship between Archie and Nero Wolfe.I do read books, but I never yet got any real satisfaction out of one; I always have a feeling there’s nothing alive about it, it’s all dead and gone, what’s the use, you might as well try to enjoy yourself on a picnic in a graveyard. Wolfe asked me once why the devil I ever pretended to read a book, and I told him for cultural reasons, and he said I might as well forgo the pains, that culture was like money, it comes easiest to those who need it least.In many ways, I could not say this one is the reason I will continue to read the series. Archie was continuously frustrated - and hungry. As usual, I was wrong in my guess as to who did the dastardly deed until the very end. It was also obvious that Wolfe knew at least 100 pages earlier, but needed proof. I'll stick my neck out and give this one 4 stars, but it probably just barely breaks the 3-4 line and even at that I might be feeling generous.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Rex Stout is another of those authors that I have come to late in my reading life. My first experience was with one of his last books, a short story collection, Death Times Three, which I enjoyed quite a bit. I've been trying to find his first book, Fer de Lance (1934) but so far with no luck. But I did find this book, The League of Frightened Men, his second book, originally published in 1935. From being someone who enjoyed my first experience of the great detective, Nero Wolfe, I now find my se Rex Stout is another of those authors that I have come to late in my reading life. My first experience was with one of his last books, a short story collection, Death Times Three, which I enjoyed quite a bit. I've been trying to find his first book, Fer de Lance (1934) but so far with no luck. But I did find this book, The League of Frightened Men, his second book, originally published in 1935. From being someone who enjoyed my first experience of the great detective, Nero Wolfe, I now find my self an unabashed fan. This book was excellent, a fascinating, entertaining, great mystery. Nero Wolfe and his partner, Archie Goodwin are a great team and both interesting in their own rights. Wolfe is an oversize detective, basically housebound, whose life, while he works to solve mysteries, is quite regimented. Each morning and each afternoon, he works upstairs in his home, tending his multitude of orchids. While he can be visited, no business is conducted. He settles the remainder of his day, in his office, tending to business. Archie is his eyes, ears, arms and legs. Archie conducts the investigations, travels around New York and local environs, interviewing, gathering information. He can be Wolfe's strong arm man if necessary. The stories are told in Archie's voice, from his perspective. (Oddly enough, Wolfe does sometime leave his home, this I discovered in this story. But this seems to be a rarety, not the norm) So this story; a group of men, Harvard classmates have a secret past. While in university, they hazed another classmate and as a result caused him to have severe injuries. Out of guilt, they have banded together to pay medical bills, etc. Now two have died, or maybe been murdered. They think that Paul Chapin is involved and that he plans to kill them all. Wolfe is hired and so the story begins. I enjoyed so much how the story is presented; small details like how Wolfe decides how to bill each of the different members of the group, and so many other aspects. The story has a surprising menace throughout and the case is so very interesting (even when Archie and Wolfe seem to be grinding their heels trying to get information.) I love Archie's manner of presenting the case, his thoughts on Wolfe; a combination of affection and anger. Great story and now I will have to read the whole series. An excellent story and mystery. Can you figure out the ending? (5 stars!)

  7. 5 out of 5

    John Yeoman

    This is arguably the first Nero Wolfe novel and probably the best. The author Rex Stout thought so himself. Across 47 Wolfe novels and anthologies, Stout kept up a remarkable quality, especially as he never edited a word. His later novels might be accused of digression, twittering dialogue that went nowhere, and loose structure. (Robert Heinlein exhibited the same faults in his dotage.) But this is ingenious, crisp and as sharply crafted as an Aztec crystal skull. No point in reviewing the plot. This is arguably the first Nero Wolfe novel and probably the best. The author Rex Stout thought so himself. Across 47 Wolfe novels and anthologies, Stout kept up a remarkable quality, especially as he never edited a word. His later novels might be accused of digression, twittering dialogue that went nowhere, and loose structure. (Robert Heinlein exhibited the same faults in his dotage.) But this is ingenious, crisp and as sharply crafted as an Aztec crystal skull. No point in reviewing the plot. Read the story! If you've never read Nero Wolfe before, you'll join a global club of addicts.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    Stout, Rex. THE LEAGUE OF FRIGHTENED MEN. (1935). **. I’m usually an enthusiastic fan of Stout’s Nero Wolfe mysteries, but this one challenged my enthusiasm. The middle part of the novel was incredibly boring and drawn out. Here goes: A group of men visit Nero Wolfe’s offices and explain that they want him to take on a case of a rampant murderer and bringing him to justice. Until that was accomplished, they lived in fear of their lives. It seems that when these men – all of them Harvard graduate Stout, Rex. THE LEAGUE OF FRIGHTENED MEN. (1935). **. I’m usually an enthusiastic fan of Stout’s Nero Wolfe mysteries, but this one challenged my enthusiasm. The middle part of the novel was incredibly boring and drawn out. Here goes: A group of men visit Nero Wolfe’s offices and explain that they want him to take on a case of a rampant murderer and bringing him to justice. Until that was accomplished, they lived in fear of their lives. It seems that when these men – all of them Harvard graduates – were students, they participated in a hazing exercise of a freshman that led to his becoming physically handicapped after a fall from a four story building. They believed that he was slowly seeking revenge for this mishap after all these years. They “knew” the identity of the killer. Not only that, but the killer had the gall to boast of his success after each of his victims was killed. He sent a poem incorporating the boast to each of the members of the group. Wolfe agrees to take up their case after carefully drafting a business agreement that allots different payments from each of the members after he has succeeded, from each according to his capability. Since the members of the group agreed that there was no need to track down the known killer, they insisted instead that Wolfe accumulate proof that the killer was indeed the killer. This was an interesting premise for Wolfe and Archie Goodwin to act on, but it provides lots of slack for developing far-fetched sources of evidence. Anyway...Wolfe accomplishes his task according to contract, but there are lots of twists and turns on the way to the end. This was not one of Stout’s best.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Deb Jones

    College hijinks lead to the lifelong crippling of a young man. Those who felt responsible for the terrible accident banded together to do all they could to make amends for their foolishness to that man, who as the years have passed has become a successful author. One by one, members of the group, or league, are found dead under suspicious circumstances. To make matters worse for the league, each of them has received anonymous lines of verse taking credit for each death in turn and intimating that College hijinks lead to the lifelong crippling of a young man. Those who felt responsible for the terrible accident banded together to do all they could to make amends for their foolishness to that man, who as the years have passed has become a successful author. One by one, members of the group, or league, are found dead under suspicious circumstances. To make matters worse for the league, each of them has received anonymous lines of verse taking credit for each death in turn and intimating that anyone could be next. Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin have their work cut out for them as they try to put the pieces together, hopefully before any more deaths can occur. This story is one heck of a ride, so hold onto your hat and enjoy the ride.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Second installment in the Nero Wolfe detective series. Thirty years ago a club of Harvard upperclassmen gathered together and inadvertently maimed an unsuspecting freshman in a hazing incident on old Harvard yard. Nothing really comes out of the incident until thirty years later when one of the club members, a guy named Judge Harrison, falls to his death at a club reunion. The following monday the club members receive a letter supposedly from the maimed member, whose name is Paul Chapin, that bas Second installment in the Nero Wolfe detective series. Thirty years ago a club of Harvard upperclassmen gathered together and inadvertently maimed an unsuspecting freshman in a hazing incident on old Harvard yard. Nothing really comes out of the incident until thirty years later when one of the club members, a guy named Judge Harrison, falls to his death at a club reunion. The following monday the club members receive a letter supposedly from the maimed member, whose name is Paul Chapin, that basically says "You should have killed me when you had the chance." Thus the fear. Chapin is widely regarded by all the members to be brilliant, so when another of the club members is killed, and no one can explain how it happened, most of the members suspect Chapin to be killer (and they get a letter about the second murder. That doesn't help much). Enter Nero Wolfe. A few things need to be said about Nero Wolfe He's a person of size He loves beer He loves his orchids as much as his beer He loves food He leaves the house only once or twice a year He's a genius I don't know about you, but that sounds like the perfect life. To do his yeoman's work Nero sends out his personal assistant, and the narrator of the story, Archie Goodwin. Outside of knowing that Archie narrates the story and what I told you in the third paragraph, there isn't much I can say besides what I thought about the book. I liked it. It was a good read. At times it tended to rely to heavily on the clichéd gumshoe "And then I knocked him in the kisser SEE!" private eye talk, but besides the almost hackneyed language (and Stout might have invented that hackneyed language), I found it to be a good diversion from life. Which I'm beginning to think could be my way of reading. Hmmm. I'm getting tired of thinking so much.

  11. 5 out of 5

    sylph

    I hadn't read this one since childhood, so I remembered almost none of it. In a way, I loved it. But not necessarily as a detective story. I'm not into looking for plotholes, yet I noticed two or three which took me out of the story briefly. No, what I loved was how absorbing the language and dialogue is. I think Stout tightened things up in later books, and that's good. But this early story has something later ones are missing; a love not only of language, but of thinking about language. Which I hadn't read this one since childhood, so I remembered almost none of it. In a way, I loved it. But not necessarily as a detective story. I'm not into looking for plotholes, yet I noticed two or three which took me out of the story briefly. No, what I loved was how absorbing the language and dialogue is. I think Stout tightened things up in later books, and that's good. But this early story has something later ones are missing; a love not only of language, but of thinking about language. Which is a love I share. In this book, several people just wax on philosophically about this or that, and it made me want to live in a world where that was a perfectly ordinary thing to do. As to the story itself, although the "twist" to the plot was telegraphed ahead of time, it was mostly a pleasure watching it all unfold. I've read that Rex Stout wrote all his books straight through and turned them in without editing. That's impressive if true. This one needed more editing than it got in order to be a better mystery, yet I'd hate to have had much of the winding dialogue removed.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nawfal

    Definitely earns the praise it gets for being an involved, psychology-filled story. A lot of the details are either too obscure or intricate for me to follow. That's okay with me - I read for entertainment, trusting that detectives and cops and heroes in stories are capable and skilled. They don't need me back-checking their work. Anyway, Archie is great. Nero is great. And I have sympathy for Fritz. And Nero makes beer sound so good. Overall, a character-driven story with lots of misdirections Definitely earns the praise it gets for being an involved, psychology-filled story. A lot of the details are either too obscure or intricate for me to follow. That's okay with me - I read for entertainment, trusting that detectives and cops and heroes in stories are capable and skilled. They don't need me back-checking their work. Anyway, Archie is great. Nero is great. And I have sympathy for Fritz. And Nero makes beer sound so good. Overall, a character-driven story with lots of misdirections and Wolfe playing cards close to his chest. For everyone to enjoy.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    This episode of the Nero Wolfe Mysteries find Nero and Archie investigating an apparent murder at a Harvard Reunion. Thrity years before, the friends talk Paul Chapin (now a famous author) into doing something dangerous, it all goes wrong and Paul is left crippled. Back in the present of the 1930's, the friends begin to die in suspicious ways followed by murder notes to the survivors. Is it Paul taking revenge or is it a set-up? Only Wolfe and Archie can uncover the truth!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jim Townsend

    Excellent second novel in the Nero Wolfe mystery series. This one features a group of Harvard grads, one of whom was injured in a hazing incident instigated by the others. Twenty five years later, people in this group begin to die in horrible ways. Nero and his employee Archie Goodwin are on the case.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Vicki Cline

    This is my second time through the Nero Wolfe oeuvre and I am definitely enjoying it. I can never figure out whodunit but the solution is always logical. In each of the first two books, there's a twist at the end; it will be interesting to see if that continues. Plus in this one, Wolfe leaves the house!!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    I enjoy these characters and the pre-television style of writing.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Good, old fashioned detective novel, but I'd forgotten that Rex Stout is VERY tough to ready. I spent most of my time looking up 10 letter words. Classic though...I may have to read more...later.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I found the narrator character very amusing. I will probably read more from this series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    meeners

    for the past 5 years or so i've been haphazardly making my way through the nero wolfe canon, entirely out of order, based on library availability and readerly mood at the time. mostly it hasn't mattered, as each book has more-or-less the same familiar beats and rhythms, including inevitable descriptions of . . . + wolfe's orchids, and the rigid schedule wolfe keeps in order to maintain them + archie and wolfe eating an elaborate meal cooked by a demure fritz, usually featuring at least one ingred for the past 5 years or so i've been haphazardly making my way through the nero wolfe canon, entirely out of order, based on library availability and readerly mood at the time. mostly it hasn't mattered, as each book has more-or-less the same familiar beats and rhythms, including inevitable descriptions of . . . + wolfe's orchids, and the rigid schedule wolfe keeps in order to maintain them + archie and wolfe eating an elaborate meal cooked by a demure fritz, usually featuring at least one ingredient and/or cooking method i am utterly unfamiliar with + archie drinking milk + saul panzer (+ description of his big nose and/or superior freelancer skills) + a visit by a disgruntled inspector cramer, usually chomping on an unlit cigar + "Satisfactory." + wolfe's misogyny + at least one beautiful woman appealing to archie for help, followed by banter that shies just on this side of glib but usually ends up with archie being gallant despite himself + at least one male character "squeaking" a protest, alerting the reader that this person shouldn't be taken seriously by anyone at all + wolfe pushing his lips in and out every time he's solved a case . . . all of which is narrated in archie goodwin's irreverent, sharp, and quick-witted voice. it was with some shock and a strange sense of discombobulation, then, to read this book (only the second in the series) and to have so many of the mainstays i have come to expect in a nero wolfe mystery entirely absent, or warped. in nero wolfe's case this actually felt like something of an improvement: he comes off here as more generous, and more fallible; his later vocal dislike of women is also entirely absent, allowing for some engaging interactions that are almost impossible to imagine happening in later books. in archie's case, however, all the differences felt like a betrayal. his narration is lousy with lousy street slang, he has only a trace of introspection in him, and he is much too deferential to wolfe. (he constantly calls wolfe "sir" without the slightly trace of irony! what the heck??!?!) i think rex stout must have realized that early archie goodwin was too much of a caricature - the "wisecrackin' street tough" characterization gets smoothed out into something more sophisticated and memorable in later books, and thank goodness. knowledge of that later incarnation, though, made for a constant distraction: comparisons kept forcing their way to my mind as i read and prevented me from engaging with the book on its own terms. which is perhaps a shame, as the character of paul chapin is quite a unique one in the nero wolfe mystery canon (as the introduction to the edition i own points out), and the unfolding of the plot more unconventional than later established patterns would dictate. on the other hand, there is one thing in early-era archie goodwin's favor which i would not have been able to fully appreciate without all those comparisons, and that is his surprising (and immensely moving) vulnerability - both physical and emotional. (view spoiler)[i am thinking in particular of the moment when archie actually cries (TWICE!), and the masterful way stout sketches out the frustration and pain and self-loathing and drug-addled fog he is feeling in that moment without directly spelling it out. (hide spoiler)] wolfe's amazing parting salvo at the very end of the novel could most likely only have been possible with early-era archie goodwin, too. so, in summary: i mourn the thwarted possibilities of early-era nero wolfe, but celebrate the triumphant rise of late-era archie goodwin. does that mean it's a draw? does it even make sense to think about books in this way? how about i just give this book 3 stars and leave it at that.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alípio Vieira Firmino

    Mais um autor que me fascinou, boa escrita + inteligência = policial brilhante. Quando iniciei o meu percurso enquanto leitor, não necessitei de muito tempo para concluir que os policias são o meu género de eleição. Anteriormente, num post aqui publicado sobre o livro "Tempo de Espionagem" de Agatha Christie", falei sobre uma das escritoras de policiais mais conhecidas e conceituadas, e após finalizar esta leitura creio ter encontrado um autor com a capacidade de lhe fazer frente. Rex Stout é por Mais um autor que me fascinou, boa escrita + inteligência = policial brilhante. Quando iniciei o meu percurso enquanto leitor, não necessitei de muito tempo para concluir que os policias são o meu género de eleição. Anteriormente, num post aqui publicado sobre o livro "Tempo de Espionagem" de Agatha Christie", falei sobre uma das escritoras de policiais mais conhecidas e conceituadas, e após finalizar esta leitura creio ter encontrado um autor com a capacidade de lhe fazer frente. Rex Stout é portador de uma escrita espantosa e possui a capacidade extraordinária de engendrar um bom enredo, como foi o caso de "A Liga dos Homens Assustados". Nos anos 30, o autor criou um dos personagens que faria parte de 46 dos mais de 70 romances policiais por si escritos. Deu vida a Nero Wolfe, um detective de peso (literalmente) pois além da sua mestria na resolução dos casos de que ficava encarregue, era obeso. Gourmet e apreciador de cerveja, Nero tinha um hobby ao qual dedicava maioritariamente o seu tempo: o cultivo de orquídeas. Archie Goodwin era o seu fiel companheiro, com instintos argutos e batedor de pistas no terreno. Nero, com o seu auxílio, deslindava os crimes a partir do conforto de sua casa. Odiava sair, causa essa provocada pelo seu peso e excentricidade. A forma como se entendem e trabalham em conjunto, fazem Poirot e Hastings corar de inveja. Isto porque, no meu ponto de vista, Archie é mais autónomo do que Hastings e Nero sem estar presente nos locais de crime como Poirot, consegue ter rasgos de génio semelhantes. Archie tornou-se no meu personagem favorito, é um poço de humildade e isto aliado à sua dinâmica e empenho cativa-nos por completo. Apesar do seu brilhantismo, achei Nero uma personagem arrogante e surreal. O livro começa com a morte de alguns dos integrantes de um grupo de ex-amigos universitários. Todas as pistas apontam para Paul Chapin, um homem sinistro e misterioso que em tempos terá feito parte desse núcleo. Preocupados com o seu bem estar e segurança, os restantes membros acusam-no e requisitam os serviços de Nero para autenticarem as suas suspeitas e acabar com o rol de assassinatos. Como seria de esperar numa obra deste género, não irá faltar mistério, intriga, homicídio e também um pouco de romance à mistura. Fui completamente surpreendido com a elaboração de toda a trama. O livro possui um elevado número de personagens e tive medo que se pudesse tornar um pouco confuso, mas o autor tinha tudo perfeitamente sincronizado e não me deixou ficar perdido! Gostei tanto desta obra que já fiz pesquisas sobre as edições que antecedem e se sucedem a esta. Quero explorar a sua vasta lista, conhecer novos personagens e perder-me nas teias de casos de crime por si tecidas. Para quem gosta de policiais aposto em como irão adorar este autor. Aqui vos lanço este desafio: vale a pena arriscar. Eu gostei de mais esta leitura! Para o post completo visite o meu blog: http://linkedbooks.blogspot.pt/2014/1...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Panu Mäkinen

    Pelokkaitten miesten liitto on ahdettu täyteen henkilöhahmoja. Ilmeisesti sama ongelma koskee muitakin Rex Stoutin varhaiskauden teoksia. Oli miten oli, kirjan tapahtumien lähtökohta on kaukana menneisyydessä. Paul Chapin oli loukkaantunut vaikeasti onnettomuudessa, johon syypäänä voitiin osittain pitää hänen opiskelukavereitaan. Vuodet vierivät, mutta vammat jäävät pysyviksi. Yhtäkkiä opiskelukavereita alkaa kuolla hämärissä olosuhteissa. Onnettomuuksia vai itsemurhia? Ihmisillä on eri käsityksi Pelokkaitten miesten liitto on ahdettu täyteen henkilöhahmoja. Ilmeisesti sama ongelma koskee muitakin Rex Stoutin varhaiskauden teoksia. Oli miten oli, kirjan tapahtumien lähtökohta on kaukana menneisyydessä. Paul Chapin oli loukkaantunut vaikeasti onnettomuudessa, johon syypäänä voitiin osittain pitää hänen opiskelukavereitaan. Vuodet vierivät, mutta vammat jäävät pysyviksi. Yhtäkkiä opiskelukavereita alkaa kuolla hämärissä olosuhteissa. Onnettomuuksia vai itsemurhia? Ihmisillä on eri käsityksiä ja mielipiteitä asiasta. Lopulta Andrew Hibbardin katoaminen saa veljentyttären ottamaan yhteyttä etsivä Nero Wolfeen, joka alkaa tutkia tapausta sen, minkä ehtii herkuttelun ja orkideankasvatuksen lomassa. Pelokkaitten miesten liiton jäsenet, joiksi entisiä opiskelukavereita kutsutaan, saavat nimettömiä runoja, jotka voidaan tulkita tunnustukseksi tai uhkaukseksi. Epäilyt kohdistuvat pian Paul Chapiniin, ja Nero Wolfella ja Archie Goodwinilla on visainen ongelma ratkaistavana.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Collins

    This was even better than the first book. I continue to enjoy the banter between Wolfe and Archie, and the mystery was pretty interesting. The story is set in New York City in 1935. A man who was crippled many years ago during a hazing incident at Harvard is suspected of taking his revenge on the group of men who participated - despite the fact that they have formed a “League of Atonement” and provided their victim with financial and emotional support over the years. I was struck by the viciousnes This was even better than the first book. I continue to enjoy the banter between Wolfe and Archie, and the mystery was pretty interesting. The story is set in New York City in 1935. A man who was crippled many years ago during a hazing incident at Harvard is suspected of taking his revenge on the group of men who participated - despite the fact that they have formed a “League of Atonement” and provided their victim with financial and emotional support over the years. I was struck by the viciousness directed at the man because of his disability - he walks slowly with a cane. Partially it’s because everyone thinks he might be a psychopathic murderer, but that doesn’t account for all of the disdain and disgust for “the cripple”.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Maria Carmo

    Another magnificent adventure of Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin: this time, Wolfe has to relinquish his comfort to help Archie when he is drugged and kept in a strange house... As usual, Nero Wolfe's intellectual capacities are at his best, solving all the intertwined plots that turn this book into a real masterpiece! Definitely an excellent read!!!! Maria Carmo, Lisbon 6 February 2017

  24. 4 out of 5

    thefourthvine

    Oh man. This is the second book in the series, and compared to the first, it's definitely more of what I think of as a typical Nero Wolfe book, but it is not all that fun to read. We are still deep in overt, awful racism territory, plus some deeply gross ableism that included (among many other things) the idea that physical disabilities lead to psychopathy AND an derogatory epithet I've never heard outside this book. Just, wow. This reread is REALLY driving home to me how much beginning at the be Oh man. This is the second book in the series, and compared to the first, it's definitely more of what I think of as a typical Nero Wolfe book, but it is not all that fun to read. We are still deep in overt, awful racism territory, plus some deeply gross ableism that included (among many other things) the idea that physical disabilities lead to psychopathy AND an derogatory epithet I've never heard outside this book. Just, wow. This reread is REALLY driving home to me how much beginning at the beginning is a terrible idea with the Wolfe series. Read the best ones first! Don't start here!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Well, this is #2 in the Nero Wolfe Canon, and I've read it. It is a really good book, and I can just picture Timothy Hutton and Maury Chakin playing this - it would have been great! A&E really did something stupid when they canceled the Nero Wolfe series. It's a fun book with a complicated plot involving a group of men frightened by a potential death threat. Unraveling the threat and exposing the person threatening them is a task only Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin can do.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    The second in the Nero Wolfe series, and typically good. Archie Goodwin is still basically a tough guy (later he will become much smarter), and Wolfe even repeatedly makes fun of his inability to keep up with the subtleties of what's going on. I like the later books somewhat better, after Archie becomes more of an equal partner.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dana

    I read a 1968 edition complete with the colorfully offensive slang of the 30's when this was originally published. Maybe it was because of that,or maybe because it was so early in Stout's career, but this one seemed harsher.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jest

    The first Nero Wolfe mystery I ever read and still my favorite. The Drugged!Archie part makes me squee so much you can probably hear it at the South Pole.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    Working my way through Rex Stout's Nero Wolfe's series - they are just fun reads in the genre of Dashiell Hammett.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ray Otus

    This was a good one! I sort of had it figured out and sort of didn't. Which is to say the picture in my head of "who dunnit" kept changing right up until the last few chatpers. Early on some of the language and views regarding a central character who is disabled is a little tough to take. Though the character is set up as a really great villain, you kind of root for him a little since people call him things like "a lop" (lopsided - lame). I think that is somewhat ameliorated by reading the whole This was a good one! I sort of had it figured out and sort of didn't. Which is to say the picture in my head of "who dunnit" kept changing right up until the last few chatpers. Early on some of the language and views regarding a central character who is disabled is a little tough to take. Though the character is set up as a really great villain, you kind of root for him a little since people call him things like "a lop" (lopsided - lame). I think that is somewhat ameliorated by reading the whole novel and getting a more complex view of the character, but I thought I would put that trigger alert up front. I don't think this book adds much to the characters of Archie and Nero, except for perhaps reinforcing how close they are. What it does have going for it is a ripping good mystery with some bizarre turns and a large cast of interesting characters. My favorite quotes: Wolfe: There are so many methods available for killing a fellow-being! Many more than there are for most of our usual activities, like pruning a tree or threshing wheat or making a bed or swimming. I have been often impressed, in my experience, by the ease and lack of bother with which the average murder is executed. Consider: with the quarry within reach, the purpose fixed, and the weapon in hand, it will often require up to eight or ten minutes to kill a fly, whereas the average murder, I would guess, consumes ten or fifteen seconds at the outside. In cases of slow poison and similar ingenuities death of course is lingering, but the act of murder itself is commonly quite brief. Consider again: there are certainly not more than two or three methods of killing a pig, but there are hundreds of ways to kill a man. Archie: If worry about her uncle was eating her, and I suppose it was, she was following what Wolfe called the Anglo-Saxon theory of the treatment of emotions and desserts: freeze them and hide them in your belly. Wolfe: All genius is distorted. Including my own. But so for that matter is all life; a mad and futile ferment of substances meant originally to occupy space without disturbing it. Wolfe to guest: “What would happen?” “Oh, things. Whatever might occur to us. You know college kids.” “As few as possible.” Wolfe: It is a temptation to cling to competence when we find it. Wolfe: To be broke is not a disgrace, it is only a catastrophe. Wolfe: It occurs to me that no publication either before or since the invention of printing, no theological treatise and no political or scientific creed, has ever been as narrowly dogmatic or as offensively arbitrary in its prejudices as a railway timetable.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.